Baked Yellow Plantains (Maduros Asados)

Three plantains
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  • 43 mins
  • Prep: 3 mins,
  • Cook: 40 mins
  • Yield: 6 Servings
Ratings (5)

Yellow plantains — like green ones — are those that aren't fully ripened yet. Plantains are sweeter and taste a bit more like bananas well into the maturation process when their skin begins to turn brown or black. But this isn't to say that you can't enjoy yellow plantains. Here's a simple yet delicious way to prepare them. 

What You'll Need

  • 6 yellow plantains (skins on and uniform in size)
  • 1​/2 cup ​olive oil (more or less as needed)
  • salt to taste

How to Make It

  1. Preheat the oven to 400° F. 
  2. Cut then ends off the plantains, then cut a slit lengthwise down each one without peeling it or cutting it in half. 
  3. Wrap the plantains individually in tinfoil.
  4. Place the plantains on a baking sheet and bake them for 30 to 40 minutes. The plantains should be soft but not mushy when they're done. 
  5. Let the plantains cool slightly before peeling off the skin. It should come away easily after cooking. 
  1. Arrange the cooked plantains on a serving platter. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt.
  2. Serve hot.

Tips and Variations 

  • Plantains may look like bananas, but they're quite different. They're starchy rather than sweet, so they make a good accompaniment to most main courses.
  • You can also roast the plantains on a grill in their foil wrappings. Cook for about 15 minutes per side with the grill lid closed. You can skip the tinfoil if you want to serve them with grill marks. 
  • Another option is to slice the plantains into ½-inch pieces before baking them. Cut on the diagonal for the most exposed surface area, then toss them in the oil. If you slice them, you can cut the cooking time. Ten to 15 minutes per side ought to do it, as long as you avoid crowding them. No more than two sliced plantains per baking sheet is best. Flip them over halfway through and use the middle rack in your oven. You can skip the tinfoil for this variation, too. 
  • Caramelize the plantain slices if you want to by broiling them very briefly after baking. Cut the baking time by five minutes and remove the foil, then place them in the broiler for about five minutes instead. Keep an eye on them to avoid charring them. 
  • You can often find fresh plantains in supermarkets, and especially in Latin American and Caribbean markets. They most likely won't be yellow, however, because they may be well on their way to ripeness. Don't be put off if their skins have darkened to brown or black. They're not past their prime at this stage, no matter how they compare visually to that bin full of bananas. You can also expect a few rough areas on their skins. This is normal. 
  • You can get away with using "black" plantains in this recipe if you just can't lay your hands on green or yellow ones. Just make sure they're not too soft. 
  • Use garlic salt or seasoned salt in place of regular salt if you prefer. You can also substitute coconut oil for olive oil for a nice Caribbean touch.