14 Varieties of Beautiful Anemone Flowers

Anemone Flower Varieties

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Anemone flowers have long been a favorite of florists, brides, and anyone who seeks clear, vibrant colors in the garden. A member of the Ranunculus family, the Anemone genus includes at least 63 species, of which a relatively small number has formed the basis for most of the named hybrids and cultivars now grown as garden plants. Bloom times vary considerably, but all anemones have poppy-like flowers that sway in the faintest of breezes, a characteristic that lends these plants one of their common names—windflower.

Anemones vary in their hardiness and growth requirements, but all grow easily from claw-like tubers sold in garden centers in the spring or summer. In zones where they are not hardy, anemones are often planted as annuals. Although many varieties are sun-lovers, there are also some that thrive in woodland gardens, giving a much-needed color boost to shady landscapes.

Here are 14 anemone varieties that will add elegance to floral arrangements and cheer to border gardens.

Gardening Tip

Anemones aren't fussy about soil, though they do best in slightly acidic conditions. Soaking the bulbs overnight before planting seems to soften them up and speed the rate at which they sprout.

  • 01 of 14

    De Caen Anemones (Anemone coronaria [De Caen Group])

    Anemone De Caen Group
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    Red 'De Caen' anemones are poppy lookalikes that thrive in a full sun to part shade location. Plants are hardy to zone 7, but gardeners in cooler zones can plant them in the spring for late summer blooms. Gardeners in warm climates should plant the corms in the fall for a spring show. Most of the de Caen anemones are spring bloomers that love full sun.

    The De Caen mix of anemones was developed in France in the 1800s, based on the Anemone coronaria species. A large number of cultivars are now available, comprising one of the largest groups of garden anemones. They are sometimes known collectively as French anemones.

    Native Area: Mediterranean regions; De Caen group of cultivars was developed in France

    USDA Growing Zones: Depends on variety; most are hardy in zones 7–10; grown as annuals in cooler zones

    Height: 6–24 inches (depends on variety)

    Sun Exposure: Full sun

  • 02 of 14

    'Mr. Fokker' (Anemone coronaria de Caen 'Mr. Fokker')

    Anemone Mr. Fokker
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    One delightful member of the de Caen group of A. coronaria hybrids is 'Mr. Fokker'. To those who adore blue flowers, it remains a top pick in delivering a true azure tone. 'Mr. Fokker' looks sensational growing alongside mauve spiky blooms like 'Plumblossom' snapdragon. It blooms in mid- to late spring.

    Native Area: Mediterranean regions; De Caen group of cultivars was developed in France

    USDA Growing Zones: 7–10; grown as annuals in cooler zones

    Height: 6–9 inches

    Sun Exposure: Full sun

  • 03 of 14

    'Hollandia' (Anemone coronaria de Caen 'Hollandia')

    Anemone Hollandia
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    Rich cherry blooms with a white eye and dark center await gardeners who grow 'Hollandia' anemones. This is another of the spring-blooming varieties from the De Caen mix cultivated in France in the 18th century. The bulbs thrive in loose, and complement other De Caen anemones both in the garden and the vase. 

    Native Area: Mediterranean regions; the de Caen cultivars were developed in France

    USDA Growing Zones: 7–10; grown as annuals in cooler zones

    Height: 10–16 inches

    Sun Exposure: Full sun

  • 04 of 14

    'Bordeaux' (Anemone coronaria de Caen 'Bordeaux')

    Anemone Bordeaux
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    The deep dramatic red blooms of anemone 'Bordeaux' are a welcome counterpoint to the Easter egg colors many spring flowers offer. Plant your 'Bordeaux' anemones three inches deep in sandy soil, and look for the ferny foliage to emerge in March just before the blooms. 

    This is another anemone from the De Caen mix, developed in France in the 1800s and sometimes called French anemones.

    Native Area: Mediterranean regions; the de Caen cultivars were developed in France

    USDA Growing Zones: 7–10; grown as annuals in cooler zones

    Height: 8–12 inches

    Sun Exposure: Full sun

    Continue to 5 of 14 below.
  • 05 of 14

    'The Bride' (Anemone Coronaria de Caen 'The Bride')

    Anemone The Bride
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    Anemone 'The Bride' gives wedding couples a fresh-as-a-daisy look, with a twist. The pale green centers are refreshing against the crisp white petals, and the flowers have a long vase life. Like others in the de Caen group, it is a spring bloomer.

    Native Area: Mediterranean regions; the de Caen group of cultivars was developed in France

    USDA Growing Zones: 7–10; grown as annuals in cooler zones

    Height: 10–24 inches

    Sun Exposure: Full sun

  • 06 of 14

    'Queen Charlotte'(Anemone x hybrida 'Queen Charlotte')

    Queen Charlotte Anemone
    James A. Guilliam / Getty Images

    The showy flowers of 'Queen Charlotte' appear in August, when not much else is in bloom in the garden. Low maintenance plants spread slowly by runners, forming a handsome clump over a few years. Provide a winter mulch to help plants survive in zone 5. 

    'Queen Charlotte' is a cultivar in the very large Anemone x hybrida group, which was created by crossing  A. hupehensis, A. vitifolium, and A. tomentosa. The group is sometimes known as Japanese anemones, though this is an incorrect label, since the species are actually native to China.

    Native Area: Nursery hybrid; parents were native to China

    USDA Growing Zones: 5–8

    Height: 2–3 feet

    Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

  • 07 of 14

    'Honorine Jobert' (Anemone × hybrida 'Honorine Jobert')

    Anemone Honorine Jobert
    Jo Whitworth / Getty Images

    Gardeners in cold growing zones should try their luck with 'Honorine Jobert,' which is hardy to zone 4. In fact, this variety does poorly in the hot and humid South. Japanese anemones like this one bloom in late summer, filling the garden gap when many flowers are past their peak. 'Honorine Jobert' will do best in a partly shaded location, planted in well-drained soil. 

    'Honorine Jobert' is another cultivar in the Anemone x hybrida group, derived from genetic crosses between A. hupehensis, A. vitifolium, and A. tomentosa.

    Native Area: Nursery hybrid; parents were native to China

    USDA Growing Zones: 4–8

    Height: 3–4 feet

    Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

  • 08 of 14

    'Serenade' (Anemone x hybrida 'Serenade')

    Anemone Serenade
    Gillian Plummer / Getty Images

    Slow growing and yet offering gardeners a vigorous late summer performance, anemone 'Serenade' looks good in the cutting garden, container garden, and the border. This Japanese anemone sporting pink daisy-like flowers on wiry stems. 

    This plant is another member of the Anemone x hybrida group, a cultivar derived from genetic crosses between A. hupehensis, A. vitifolium, and A. tomentosa.

    Native Area: Nursery hybrid; parents were native to China

    USDA Growing Zones: 4–8

    Height: 3–4 feet

    Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

    Continue to 9 of 14 below.
  • 09 of 14

    'Montrose' (Anemone x hybrida 'Montrose')

    Anemone Montrose
    William Turner / Getty Images

    Slightly shaggy petals combine with sweet light purple tones for a bloom that will complete your casual floral arrangements. 'Montrose' anemones have a long bloom time from summer's end through fall, and they will survive winter temperatures of minus 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Some flowers exhibit a double layer of petals, and deer tend to pass them by. 

    'Montrose' is also a Japanese anemone, a cultivar derived from a genetic hybrid with A. hupehensis, A. vitifolium, and A. tomentosa as ancestors.

    Native Area: Nursery hybrid; parent species are native to China

    USDA Growing Zones: 4–8

    Height: 3–4 feet

    Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

  • 10 of 14

    'Richard Ahrens' (Anemone x hybrida 'Richard Ahrens')

    Anemone Richard Ahrens
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    As anyone who has grown mint will tell you, one man's easy plant is another's thuggish weed. 'Richard Ahrens' anemones can be somewhat invasive, but you can easily keep them in bounds by growing them in containers. These plants bloom with pale pink double-petal flowers from July to Septamber.

    'Richard Ahrens' is another variety that falls into that large group of hybrid Japanese anemones based on A. hupehensis, A. vitifolium, and A. tomentosa.

    Native Area: Nursery hybrid; parent species are native to China

    USDA Growing Zones: 5–7

    Height: 28–36 inches

    Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

  • 11 of 14

    'Hadspen Abundance' (Anemone hupehensis 'Hadspen Abundance')

    Anemone Hadspen Abundance
    Alexandre Petzoid / Getty Images

    Let 'Hadspen Abundance' join your asters and mums in welcoming milder weather as fall arrives. Thriving in these cool temperatures, this anemone often delights gardeners by blooming until frost. 'Hadspen Abundance' is low maintenance and naturalizes readily, yet does not behave invasively in semi-shaded areas.

    'Hadspen Abundance' is a cultivar of A. hupehensis, one of the so-called Japanese anemones (although the species is actually native to China).

    Native Area: China

    USDA Growing Zones: 5–8

    Height: 2–3 feet

    Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

  • 12 of 14

    'Praecox' (Anemone hupehensis ‘Praecox’ )

    Anemone Praecox
    Clive Nichols / Getty Images

    Dark pink petals contrast with bright gold stamens on summer-blooming 'Praecox' anemones. This anemone is unfussy about its location and soil and is suitable for beginners. It blooms from mid summer into fall.

    This plant is a cultivar of one species of the so-called Japanese anemones, A. hupehensis.

    Native Area: China

    USDA Growing Zones: 4–8

    Height: 18–30 inches

    Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

    Continue to 13 of 14 below.
  • 13 of 14

    'Pamina' (Anemone hupehensis 'Pamina')

    Anemone Pamina
    Jerry Pavia / Getty Images

    A final cultivar of A. huphensis is 'Pamina'. This Japanese anemone isn't picky at all, and in fact, will spread in sites that provide mild temperatures and consistent moisture. This anemone will grow 30 inches tall and may benefit from staking. It blooms in late summer.

    Native Area: China

    USDA Growing Zones: 5–8

    Height: 2–3 feet

    Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade

  • 14 of 14

    'Pallida' (Anemone × lipsiensis 'Pallida')

    Anemone Pallida
    Chris Burrows / Getty Images

    Also known as the wood anemone, anemone 'Pallida' likes a cool, moist spot in the woodland garden where it can slowly spread to form naturalized colonies. The plants bloom in the spring, and then usually go dormant in the summer. They make nice companions with other demure spring plants like bleeding heart flowers and Siberian bugloss. 

    'Pallida' is popular cultivar of a hybrid plant known as A. × lipsiensis, which was derived by crossing a A. nemorosa and A. ranunculoides, both woodland anemones.

    Native Area: Nursery hybrid; parent species are native Europe

    USDA Growing Zones: 4–8

    Height: 6 inches

    Sun Exposure: Part shade