20 Most Popular Indoor Trees

money tree indoors

The Spruce / Krystal Slagle 

An indoor tree serves the same function in a room as a piece of furniture: It acts as an anchor and sets a mood in your room. Trees are popular houseplants due to the structural element they add to living spaces, as well as the air-cleaning qualities they possess. When you choose an indoor tree, you must consider the light needs of the tree, how much water it will require, and its mature size.

Here are 20 indoor trees that are popular due to their low maintenance needs, compact size, and visual appeal

  • 01 of 20

    Fiddle Leaf Fig (Ficus lyrata)

    fiddle leaf fig tree

    The Spruce / Corinne Bryson

    The fiddle leaf fig hails from the jungle, so a bright bathroom would be the ideal spot for your tree. However, a living room location will also work if you protect the tree from drafts and give it enough light and humidity. Some time outdoors will do wonders for the fiddle leaf fig, so give it a temporary home as a patio plant for the month of June.

    Light: Bright, filtered light

    Water: Moist but not wet

    Temperature: Between 60 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 10 feet (indoors)

  • 02 of 20

    Citrus (Citrus family)

    Lemon tree branches with yellow lemons hanging in sunlight

    The Spruce / Sydney Brown

    The bewitching scent of an orange or lemon tree in bloom is superior to any room freshening spray you will ever encounter. Of all the popular indoor trees, citrus trees are the most demanding. They want more of everything: water, sunlight, humidity, and fertilizer. So buy a humidity tray, sneak the tree outdoors when you can, and start looking up lemon pound cake recipes.

    Light: Full sun

    Water: Moist but not wet

    Temperature: Between 50 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 6 to 10 feet (indoors)

  • 03 of 20

    Weeping Fig (Ficus benjamina)

    Weeping fig tree in white pot in corner of room near windows

    The Spruce / Krystal Slagle

    Also known as ficus trees, weeping figs are beloved for their rich green color and ease of care. A well-lit room goes a long way toward preventing the most common complaint about the weeping fig, which is leaf drop. A room with a large picture window, skylight, or south-facing window is most desirable. Plant your weeping fig in well-drained soil, and only water when the soil surface is dry. 

    Light: Bright, indirect light

    Water: Moist but not wet

    Temperature: Between 65 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 3 to 6 feet (indoors)

  • 04 of 20

    Rubber Tree (Ficus elastica)

    a rubber tree in an apartment

    The Spruce / Cara Cormack 

    Native to India, rubber trees produce large, glossy leaves in a dark green hue that pops against pale paint colors. Like most tropical trees, rubber trees like moderate temperatures, a humid environment, and good air circulation without drafts. An optional step for the pampered plant is a monthly leaf wiping session with a damp cloth to remove dust. Fertilize your rubber tree every two weeks during periods of active growth to achieve maximum leaf size. 

    Light: Bright, indirect light

    Water: Moist but not wet

    Temperature: Between 50 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 6 to 10 feet (indoors)

    Continue to 5 of 20 below.
  • 05 of 20

    Banana Tree (Musa spp.)

    Banana tree in gray pot near gray chair and other houseplants

    The Spruce / Phoebe Cheong

    Giant leaf lovers should look no further than an indoor banana tree to satisfy a desire for lush foliage. Some banana trees, such as the Cavendish, produce fruit while others, such as Musa basjoo, do not. When shopping for an indoor banana tree, seek out dwarf cultivars only to keep their size manageable. Filtered light and regular fertilizing help these fast-growing trees reach their potential. If leaves start to brown or curl, check for mites, which are notorious banana pests. 

    Light: Full sun

    Water: Moist but not wet

    Temperature: Between 75 and 95 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 6 to 10 feet (indoors)

  • 06 of 20

    Norfolk Island Pine (Araucaria heterophylla)

    Norfolk island pine tree in white pot next to couch in room corner

    The Spruce / Kortney Gloska

    Around the winter holidays, small potted Norfolk Island pine trees are available as "indoor Christmas trees." But these long-lived indoor trees look great at any time of year. Be aware that these trees can grow to more than 100 feet outdoors, and there is no dwarf variety on the market. An indoor tree will grow about 2 feet each year, so you will have a few years at least before you'll need to move it outdoors. Bright light, moderate watering, and occasional misting will keep your pine happy. 

    Light: Full sun; can tolerate shade

    Water: Moderate moisture; let soil dry between waterings

    Temperature: 65 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit (can tolerate cooler weather briefly)

    Average height: 2 feet each year (indoors)

  • 07 of 20

    Umbrella Tree (Schefflera spp.)

    Umbrella tree with shiny oval green leaves in orange pot

    The Spruce / Kara Riley

    With its attractive glossy foliage, the umbrella tree is a fine choice for homes with little direct sunlight or north-facing windows. These trees require little care, but they are attractive to pests like mites and scale, so watch out for them when you bring the tree indoors. Umbrella trees like constant moisture, but do not leave them sitting in a tray of stagnant water. 

    Light: Bright, indirect light

    Water: Moderate moisture; let soil dry between waterings

    Temperature: Above 60 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 4 to 15 feet (indoors)

  • 08 of 20

    Yucca (Yucca spp.)

    Yucca trees with leathery strap-like leaves in room corner by windows

    The Spruce / Krystal Slagle

    Yucca trees, also called yucca stick or spineless yucca, offer a striking live accent in homes. The yucca tree features a solid trunk with leathery strap-like leaves emerging from the top. Groups of three in a pot with staggered heights look very attractive. Give your yucca tree as much sun as possible, and don't be afraid to cut the plant in half if it outgrows its space. 

    Light: Full sun or bright, indirect sun

    Water: Moderate moisture; let soil dry between waterings

    Temperature: 35 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: Up to 10 feet (indoors)

    Continue to 9 of 20 below.
  • 09 of 20

    Jade (Crassula ovata)

    a jade plant by the window

    The Spruce / Leticia Almeida

    The jade tree is probably the lowest maintenance indoor tree on this list, making it perfect for beginners and anyone who doesn't have a lot of time to care for houseplants. The succulent leaves and trunk of this plant give it a sculptural look in a space. Jade trees even make great bonsai specimens. Just water the plant every few weeks, and keep it by a sunny window. 

    Light: Four or more hours of direct sunlight daily

    Water: Keep lightly moist in spring and summer; water monthly in winter

    Temperature: 50 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit (can tolerate cooler weather in winter)

    Average height: 3 to 6 feet

  • 10 of 20

    Money Tree (Pachira aquatica)

    money tree closeup

    The Spruce / Krystal Slagle

    The spindly trunk of the money tree lends it to braiding, and that is how many of these trees are sold. The braids will grow with the tree over time, hardening and becoming woody as the plant matures. In spite of its Latin name, Pachira aquatica, the money tree does not like excessive watering and will rot if left in standing water. Make sure your container has excellent drainage.

    Light: Bright, indirect light

    Water: Moderate moisture; let soil dry between waterings

    Temperature: 28 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 6 to 8 feet

  • 11 of 20

    Lady Palm (Rhapis excelsa)

    Lady palm tree with fan-shaped, glossy fronds in white pot closeup

    The Spruce / Kara Riley

    The lady palm is a popular palm specimen to grow as an indoor tree thanks to its ability to tolerate low-light conditions. It also has a slow growth rate, meaning it won’t take up much space in a room. But its fan-shaped, glossy green fronds will still add a tropical feel to any space. Plan to water and feed more during the growing season and back off over the winter. Also, protect your palm from direct sun, as it can burn the fronds.

    Light: Bright, indirect light

    Water: Moderate moisture; let soil dry between waterings

    Temperature: 60 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: Up to 6 feet (indoors)

  • 12 of 20

    Dragon Tree (Dracaena marginata)

    Dragon tree in small white pot with sword-shaped leaves in living room

    The Spruce / Krystal Slagle

    The dragon tree can make for a stunning houseplant with its sword-shaped green leaves with red edges. This plant is quite hardy and easy to care for. Plus, it’s slow-growing and adapts well to life in a container. Keep your plant out of direct sunlight, as this can burn the foliage. And be sure not to overwater it, which can cause the leaf tips to turn brown.

    Light: Bright, indirect light

    Water: Moderate moisture; let soil dry between waterings

    Temperature: 70 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: Up to 6 feet (indoors)

    Continue to 13 of 20 below.
  • 13 of 20

    Parlor Palm (Chamaedorea elegans)

    Parlor palm tree in gold pot on white mantle next to mirror and cacti in pots

    The Spruce / Krystal Slagle

    As its common name suggests, the parlor palm has long been grown in parlors and other indoor spaces. It adapts well to relatively low-light conditions, remains fairly small indoors, and adds a tropical vibe to a space with its lush green fronds on multiple stems. In fact, giving a parlor palm too much care is often what damages it, especially via overwatering. These palms also are fairly light feeders and only need a weak liquid fertilizer once or twice during the growing season.

    Light: Bright, indirect light

    Water: Moist but not wet

    Temperature: 65 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 2 to 6 feet (indoors)

  • 14 of 20

    Majesty Palm (Ravenea revularis)

    Majesty palm tree in wicker basket next to music speaker and record player

    The Spruce / Kara Riley

    The majesty palm is commonly seen in nurseries sold as an indoor tree specimen. It’s a very attractive palm tree with large, arching, green fronds on multiple stems. Indoors, it has a slow growth rate, gaining up to a foot per year. These palms can be a bit picky about their growing conditions. They prefer warmth and high humidity, along with lightly moist but not waterlogged soil.

    Light: Bright, indirect light

    Water: Moist but not wet

    Temperature: 65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: Up to 10 feet (indoors)

  • 15 of 20

    Corn Plant (Dracaena fragrans)

    Corn plant with thick stem and long narrow leaves near window

    The Spruce / Cara Cormack

    The corn plant does not in fact produce corn. Instead, it grows from one or more thick stems that form long, narrow leaves (like those of corn) at their tops. They make good indoor trees because they grow tall and narrow, meaning they don’t take up a lot of floor space. And they are fairly hardy plants that can withstand less-than-ideal growing conditions. But maintaining a humid environment is key for healthy growth, along with keeping them away from drafts.

    Light: Bright, indirect light

    Water: Moist but not wet

    Temperature: 60 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: Up to 6 feet (indoors)

  • 16 of 20

    Areca Palm (Dypsis lutescens)

    Areca palm in white and brown geometric pot next to wooden side table

    The Spruce / Candace Madonna

    Areca palms are commonly seen as houseplants as well as landscape plants in tropical climates. These palms have a clumping growth habit with many stems much like bamboo. In fact, another common name for the plant is the bamboo palm. They do well indoors by a bright window. Plus, they are slow growers and won't need repotting often. Aim to keep their location humid as dry air can turn the leaf tips brown.

    Light: Full sun or bright, indirect light

    Water: Moist but not wet

    Temperature: 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 6 to 7 feet (indoors)

    Continue to 17 of 20 below.
  • 17 of 20

    Kumquat (Citrus japonica)

    Kumquat tree with orange green kumquat fruit

    The Spruce / Kerry Michaels

    Kumquat trees generally take well to growing in containers and even have the potential to bear fruit indoors. The key to success is giving them as much bright light as possible and using a supplemental grow light if you don’t have bright windows. Also, kumquat trees don’t tolerate sitting in soggy soil well, so don’t overwater and use a container with excellent drainage. The trees have dense, glossy, dark green foliage that looks great even if they don’t happen to bear their small orange fruits.

    Light: Full sun

    Water: Moist but not wet

    Temperature: 55 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 6 to 12 feet (indoors)

  • 18 of 20

    Bay Laurel (Laurus nobilis)

    Bay laurel tree in orange pot in front of wooden fence

    The Spruce / Almar Creative

    Bay laurel’s pointed oval leaves are a common cooking ingredient. And it’s fairly easy to keep this plant as an indoor tree to have its leaves right at your fingertips. Bay laurel has a slow growth rate and takes well to pruning, so you will be able to keep the container plant at your desired size. Use a container that just fits the plant’s root ball, as bay laurel likes to be a little cramped. And make sure not to overwater. 

    Light: Full sun or bright, indirect light

    Water: Moderate moisture; let soil dry between waterings

    Temperature: 65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 4 to 6 feet (indoors)

  • 19 of 20

    Guava (Psidium guajava)

    Guava tree branches with large waxy leaves and green guava fruit hanging

    The Spruce / Gyscha Rendy

    Guava is a shrub or small tree that's native to tropical regions. However, it also can be grown indoors if you can mimic its preferred tropical conditions. Give your plant lots of light, warmth, and humidity. Moving it outside during the warmer months is a good option to get the plant the sunlight it craves. These plants grow from a single or multi-stemmed trunk. They won’t always flower and bear fruit indoors, but their mottled green bark and large green leaves still provide visual interest.

    Light: Full sun

    Water: Moist but not wet

    Temperature: 65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 4 to 10 feet (indoors)

  • 20 of 20

    Ponytail Palm (Beaucarnea recurvata)

    Ponytail palm tree in white pot near gold watering can and wicker chair with pillows

    The Spruce / Lisa Ruschioni

    Ponytail palms are popular indoor trees thanks to their slow growth rate and long lifespan. It can take several years before a young ponytail palm reaches even a few feet tall, so these are perfect plants for desktops and other surfaces. Their narrow, ribbon-like, green leaves cascade down the stem. These plants like as much light as possible and don’t require much care beyond watering every one to two weeks.

    Light: Full sun or bright, indirect light

    Water: Moderate moisture, let soil dry between waterings

    Temperature: Above 60 degrees Fahrenheit

    Average height: 6 to 8 feet (indoors)

Article Sources
The Spruce uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.
  1. Claudio, Luz. Planting Healthier Indoor Air. Environmental Health Perspectives, 119,10, A426-7, 2011, doi:10.1289/ehp.119-a426

  2. Escobar-Garcia, Hector Alonso, Andrade, Daniel Junior. (2021) Preliminary Survey, Diversity, and Population Density of Mites in Banana, Musa AAA (Cavendish Subgroup) CV. Williams in PeruInternational Journal of Acarology, 47,2,170-173, 2021, doi:10.1080/01647954.2021.1879263

  3. Tojo, M., Kuroda, K., Suzuki, H. First Report of Stem Rot of Guiana Chestnut (Pachira aquatica) Caused by Pythium splendens. Plant Disease, 88,1,2004, doi:10.1094/PDIS.2004.88.1.84A