Print Size Comparisons, Explanations, and Hanging Size

Almost every picture taken today is recorded on a small negative or sensor and then enlarged to the desired print size. There are an almost dizzying array of print size options available but there is a small core of standard, or most common, sizes that will fit almost any need. From deciding how big you can print your picture, to what will be cropped out, to how big you should get a print to hang on your wall, this list will take you through all you need to know about photo print sizes.

  • 01 of 05
    © Liz Masoner, all rights reserved

    If you shoot digital you need to understand what a megapixel actually represents. This will help you understand just how much data you have when working to enlarge a photo.

  • 02 of 05
    © Liz Masoner, all rights reserved

    Most negatives/sensors used record a roughly 4x6 shaped image.  This article will explain how your pictures will be cropped when using a 5x7, 8x10, or even 20x30 print of your pictures.

  • 03 of 05
    © Liz Masoner, all rights reserved

    Just how big is a 4x6 compared to a 16x20? This illustration will show you just how the photo print sizes stack up against each other.

  • 04 of 05
    © Liz Masoner, all rights reserved

    No photo can be enlarged, or blown up, for infinity. At some point, you lose too much image quality to make a reasonable print. Figuring out how big you can print your pictures isn't difficult and this article will show you how to decide.

    Continue to 5 of 5 below.
  • 05 of 05
    © Liz Masoner

    At some point, nearly all of us have been disappointed to hang a photo on the wall over a sofa and realize just how much smaller the picture looks now that it is on the wall. This illustration will point out how your pictures will look in relation to your furniture.