Crochet a Cotton Dishcloth Pattern and Tutorial

  • 01 of 08

    Dishcloth Pattern Introduction

    Free Cotton Dishcloth Crochet Pattern
    Completed Dishcloth -- This Photo Shows How It Looks Before Blocking. Photo © Amy Solovay, Licensed to About.com, Inc.

    This cotton dishcloth features openwork stripes crocheted using a combination of basic stitches. The finishing touch is a lacy picot-stitch edging.

    Abbreviations Used in This Pattern:

    Supply List:

    Yarn: You will need approximately 4 ounces of worsted weight kitchen cotton yarn.

    The example was crocheted using Lily's Original Sugar 'n Cream yarn in the cream color. This yarn is available...MORE in many different colors, so choose one that complements your kitchen. Feel free to substitute another worsted weight cotton yarn if you prefer.

    Crochet Hook: size H / 8 (5.00 mm.) or size needed to obtain the correct gauge.

    Finished Size:

    When the dishcloth is laid flat, it measures 14.5" high by 14" wide including the edging.

    Without the edging, it measures 10.5" high by 10" wide.

    Gauge:

    15 sc sts and 13 rows = 4"

    Tip: Gauge is not critical for this project; it's no problem if your dishcloth turns out slightly larger or smaller than the example. It's still a good idea to check your gauge, but don't waste time ripping out stitches unless it's way off.

    Continue to 2 of 8 below.
  • 02 of 08

    Directions for Crocheting the Dishcloth

    Work the First Six Rows of the Dishcloth in Single Crochet.
    Work the First Six Rows of the Dishcloth in Single Crochet. Photo © Amy Solovay

    It is helpful to crochet the starting chain using a hook that is one size larger than the hook you plan to use for the rest of the project. If you do not switch crochet hooks, be sure to crochet your starting chain loosely.

    Work sc stitches in front loops unless directed otherwise.

    Ch 38

    Row 1: sc in 3rd ch from hook, and in every ch afterwards. (36 sc)

    Rows 2 - 6: Ch 2, turn. Work entire row in sc. (36 sc)

    Continue to 3 of 8 below.
  • 03 of 08

    Directions for Crocheting the Openwork Pattern

    Here's a Detailed View of the Openwork Pattern Created in Row 7.
    Here's a Detailed View of the Openwork Pattern Created in Row 7. Photo © Amy Solovay

    Row 7: Ch 3, turn.

    Begin the Openwork Pattern:

    1 dc in next st. Skip next 2 sts. (In following st: dc, ch 1, dc. Skip 2 sts.) Repeat the sequence inside the parentheses 10 more times for a total of 11 times. Work 1 more dc in each of the last 2 sts.

    Continue to 4 of 8 below.
  • 04 of 08

    Continue Working the Crocheted Openwork Pattern

    When Working Row 8, Insert Your Crochet Hook Into the Ch-1 Spaces Formed in the Previous Row.
    When Working Row 8, Insert Your Crochet Hook Into the Ch-1 Spaces Formed in the Previous Row. Photo © Amy Solovay

    Row 8: Ch 3, turn. 1 dc in next st.

    To work the rest of this row, insert your hook only into the ch 1 spaces formed in the previous row. Skip the other stitches. (dc, ch 1, dc.)

    Repeat the sequence inside the parentheses 10 more times for a total of 11 times.

    Work 2 more DC. (End of openwork pattern.)

    Continue to 5 of 8 below.
  • 05 of 08

    Crochet the Center of the Dishcloth

    Here's Row 9 in Progress.
    Here's Row 9 in Progress. Photo © Amy Solovay

    Row 9: ch 2, turn.

    Ch 1 in 1st dc st from previous row.

    The rest of this row will also be worked in sc. However, instead of placing your hook in the front loop of each stitch, you will insert your hook inside the spaces formed by the openwork pattern in the previous row.

    For example, to form the first sc in the row, insert your hook in between the last 2 dc stitches crocheted in the previous row. To form the next 2 sc stitches after that, insert your hook into the space formed by the ch stitch in...MORE the previous row.

    Continue working in this manner the whole way across the row, making 1 sc in each space formed between dc stitches and 2 scs in each ch 1 space.

    At the end of the row, sc in the last dc and then work 1 more sc in the last ch st of the turning chain. 36 sc total.

    Rows 10 – 24: ch 2, turn. Work entire row in sc.

    Continue to 6 of 8 below.
  • 06 of 08

    Final Rows of the Crochet Dishcloth

    Duplicating the Pattern Worked in Previous Rows to Create Another Openwork Stripe
    Duplicating the Pattern Worked in Previous Rows to Create Another Openwork Stripe. Photo © Amy Solovay

    Row 25: Repeat row 7.

    Row 26: Repeat row 8.

    Row 27: Repeat row 9.

    Rows 28 – 32: ch 2, turn. Work entire row in sc.

    You now have a functional dishcloth.

    The edging is optional. If you choose not to crochet the edging, finish off and weave in your ends.

    If you plan to crochet the edging, do not finish off yet. Instead of weaving in the ends, you can hide them by working overtop of them as you crochet the edging. If you aren't sure how to work overtop of the ends, check out this tutorial: How to...MORE crochet over top of yarn ends.

    Continue to 7 of 8 below.
  • 07 of 08

    Tips for Beginners

    Detail Photo of the Stitches in the Crocheted Dishcloth
    Detail Photo of the Stitches in the Crocheted Dishcloth. Photo © Amy Solovay

    Count Your Stitches. When working rows of single crochet, it is easy to accidentally gain or lose stitches. Counting each stitch will help you to ensure that your dishcloth turns out square as intended. If your count is off, go back and fix it before crocheting the next row.

    Don't Stress About Uneven Sides. Even if you follow the pattern exactly, the sides of your dishcloth might turn out uneven. Don't worry about this. It takes practice to crochet nice neat sides; if you keep practicing,...MORE you'll get to the point where your sides are always consistent.

    In the meanwhile, this dishcloth's edging is designed to hide imperfections. Assuming you don't gain or lose any stitches, the uneven spots on the sides of the dishcloth will be hidden under your edging.

    Continue to 8 of 8 below.
  • 08 of 08

    The Next Step – Crochet the Edging

    Here's How the Dishcloth Looks Without the Edging.
    Here's How the Dishcloth Looks Without the Edging. Photo © Amy Solovay

    The next step is to crochet the edging for the dishcloth.