Make This DIY Coat Rack for Your Home

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    Learn How to Make This Quick-to-Build DIY Coat Rack

    DIY Coat Rack
    Lee Wallender

    Tired of coats and backpacks strewn all over your house's entryway or mudroom? Tame that mess with this beautiful walnut coat rack. It's strong enough to hold three heavy winter coats or even a couple of lightweight jackets, plus a school backpack, all without falling. Inspired by the work of a Frank Lloyd Wright's home in California, this lean design is an elegant rhythm of squares and trapezoids. Set against a long, horizontal beam, its basic shapes are the perfect complement to other Arts and Crafts home elements. 

    You'll be able to finish this coat rack in less than two hours, using basic tools that you may already own. Walnut or other hardwood options are preferable, both for stability and for appearance. But if budgets are tight, you can use a softer, less expensive wood such as Douglas Fir or Hemlock. 

    Tools and Materials You'll Need

    • Electric miter saw
    • Electric sander
    • Fine grit sandpaper
    • Cordless drill
    • Speed Square
    • Straight edge or tape measure
    • Wood glue
    • Danish oil
    • Tack cloth and rags
    • Clamps
    • Bubble level
    • Walnut or other hardwood board, totaling about 30 inches long by 3 1/2 true inches wide
    • (2) 2 1/2-inch brass screws
    • (10) 1 1/2-inch brass screws
    Continue to 2 of 16 below.
  • 02 of 16

    Measure the Board to 20 Inches

    Measure Board to 20 Inches
    Lee Wallender

    Measure out 20 inches of ​the board and mark it with the pencil.

    Continue to 3 of 16 below.
  • 03 of 16

    Cut the Board to 20 Inches

    Cut the Board to 20 Inches
    Lee Wallender

    With the electric miter saw, cut the board to 20 inches long. Place the cut board to the side.

    Continue to 4 of 16 below.
  • 04 of 16

    Measure Out the Hooks

    Measure 3 Pieces at 1.5 Inches Each
    Lee Wallender

    From the remaining 30 inches of ​the board, measure out three pieces for the hooks. Each hook will be 1 1/2 inches wide and as high as the board (3 1/2 inches).

    Continue to 5 of 16 below.
  • 05 of 16

    Cut Notches in the Hooks

    Place Hooks in Saw at 45 Degrees
    Lee Wallender

    Stack the three hooks on top of each other and place them in the electric miter saw. Rotate the saw so that it will make a 45-degree cut.

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  • 06 of 16

    Coat Hook Notches: Close-Up

    Coat Hook Notches: Close-Up
    Lee Wallender

    The notches for the hooks should end at about 1/2-inch from the end for a perfect replica of the Frank Lloyd Wright design. Or you can experiment with different angles and find one that looks best to you.

    Continue to 7 of 16 below.
  • 07 of 16

    Cut Two 2-Inch Squares

    Cut Two 2-Inch Squares
    Lee Wallender

    From the remainder board, cut out two squares, each square measuring 2 inches by 2 inches.

    Continue to 8 of 16 below.
  • 08 of 16

    Sand All of the Pieces

    Sand All of the Pieces
    Lee Wallender

    With the electric sander and fine grit sandpaper, lightly sand down all of the wood pieces. Lightly round off the edges and corners.

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  • 09 of 16

    Clean with Damp Cloth or Tack Cloth

    Clean with Damp Cloth or Tack Cloth
    Lee Wallender

    Use a very damp cloth or a beeswax-embedded tack cloth to remove sawdust from the wood pieces. 

    Continue to 10 of 16 below.
  • 10 of 16

    Attach Hooks to the Board

    Attach Hooks to the Board
    Lee Wallender

    The three hooks will be attached to the front of the rack, positioned so that each hook rises 1/2-inch above the top of the rack. This protrusion is necessary to give the coats and scarves a place to hook onto.

    Horizontally, the two outer hooks will be positioned inward 1/2-inch from each side. The middle hook will be positioned exactly in the center. Use the Speed Square to keep the hooks perpendicular to the board.

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  • 11 of 16

    Screw the Hooks to the Board from the Back

    Screw the Hooks to the Board from the Back
    Lee Wallender

    Turn the rack over, so that the back is facing you. Screw the hooks into place, using two 1 1/2-inch brass screws per hook.

    Be sure to create pilot holes for the screws to avoid splitting the wood.

    Continue to 12 of 16 below.
  • 12 of 16

    Add Holes to Hang the Coat Rack

    Add Holes to Hang the Coat Rack
    Lee Wallender

    For ultimate stability, the coat rack needs to be screwed directly into wall studs. Because walls studs are typically 16 inches (on-center)  apart from each other, drill two holes in the coat rack 16 inches apart.

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  • 13 of 16

    Apply Glue to the Squares

    Apply Glue to the Squares
    Lee Wallender

    The two squares are purely decorative, acting as a visual balance to the three hooks. Since they will not be carrying any weight, you can glue these to the board. Squeeze a small amount of glue to the backs of the squares.

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  • 14 of 16

    Clamp the Squares and Let Them Cure

    Clamp the Squares and Let Them Cure
    Lee Wallender

    Position the squares equidistant between the hooks, flush with the top of the coat rack. Clamp the squares. Leave the coat rack for at least two hours to fully cure.

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  • 15 of 16

    Apply Danish Oil to the Coat Rack

    Apply Danish Oil to the Coat Rack
    Lee Wallender

    Danish oil gives hardwood a lustrous, rich, natural look. Apply the oil to the coat rack with rags, thoroughly rubbing the oil into the wood. Leave the coat rack in a dry, well-ventilated place for at least two hours for the oil to ​fully sink in.

    Continue to 16 of 16 below.
  • 16 of 16

    Attach the Coat Rack to the Wall

    Attach the Coat Rack to the Wall
    Lee Wallender

    Screw the coat rack into the wall studs, using two 2 1/2-inch brass screws. Use the bubble level to make certain that the rack is level on the wall.