Eastern European Leftover Easter Egg Recipes

It sure was fun coloring all those eggs for Easter, wasn't it? But now you're left with dozens of them taking up space in your refrigerator. Eastern Europeans are crazy for hard-cooked eggs and use them in many recipes. Here are some egg-cellent ideas. And keep these in mind if you're dealing with that problem, too!

  • 01 of 08
    Creamed Eggs and Asparagus
    Creamed Eggs and Asparagus. © 2010 Barbara Rolek licensed to About.com, Inc.
    Hard-cooked eggs are very popular in some Eastern European cultures like Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Lithuanian, Hungarian and others. In the old days, it was a relatively economical source of protein for farmers who usually raised chickens. This recipe combines the flavors of spring -- asparagus and eggs.
  • 02 of 08
    Polish Stuffed Eggs
    Polish Stuffed Eggs. © 2009 Barbara Rolek licensed to About.com, Inc.

    Polish Stuffed Eggs, or jajka faszerowany, does double duty with leftovers, using eggs and ham. The filling also sports cheese, sour cream and mustard. What sets them apart is the broiled polonaise-style buttered bread crumb topping.

  • 03 of 08
    Hungarian Sausage and Potato Casserole
    Hungarian Sausage and Potato Casserole. © 2009 Barbara Rolek licensed to About.com, Inc.
    Smoked Hungarian sausage is the star in this one-pot comfort food dish of layered potatoes and hard-cooked eggs smothered in sour cream and bread crumbs.
  • 04 of 08
    Hungarian Potato-Ham Casserole or Rakott Krumpli
    Hungarian Potato-Ham Casserole or Rakott Krumpli. © 2010 Barbara Rolek licensed to About.com, Inc.

    This recipe for Hungarian potato-ham casserole or rakott krumpli sonkaval is layered with leftover ham, potatoes and hard-boiled eggs. Some cooks use a combination of ham and smoked Hungarian sausage or all sausage as in Hungarian Rakott Burgonya (above).

    Continue to 5 of 8 below.
  • 05 of 08
    Photo of Polish Ryemeal Soup or Zurek
    Photo of Polish Ryemeal Soup or Zurek. © 2009 Barbara Rolek licensed to About.com, Inc.

    A żur (ZHOOR) or sour, the base for this soup, is created by fermenting rye flour with water in a jar or crock for up to five days. So start the sour ahead of time! This is a hearty soup which, in Poland, is often served before obiad (the main meal of the day).

  • 06 of 08
    Russian Cabbage Pie or Kulebjaka
    Russian Cabbage Pie or Kulebjaka. © 2010 Barbara Rolek licensed to About.com, Inc.

    Russian cabbage pie or kulebjaka or kulybyaka is similar to a savory turnover like a Mexican empanada or Italian calzone. Kulebjaka can be made with a flaky puff pastry or pie dough, or a yeast dough as it is here. The fillings vary from vegetarian to meat to the famous salmon filling, and is known as kulebiak in Poland and kuliabiaka in Belarus. What seems to remain constant is the addition of lots of chopped hard-cooked eggs.

  • 07 of 08
    Polish White Borscht - Bialy Barszcz
    Polish White Borscht - Bialy Barszcz. © 2009 Barbara Rolek licensed to About.com, Inc.

    White borscht soup -- biały barszcz -- is typically eaten on Easter Sunday morning and is made with most of the foods from the świecónka basket blessed on Holy Saturday.

  • 08 of 08
    Polish Butter Cookies Decorated with Wafer Papers
    Polish Butter Cookies Decorated with Wafer Papers. © Barbara Rolek licensed to About.com, Inc.

    Here is another cookie recipe that makes use of hard-cooked egg yolks PLUS one fresh egg yolk. This is known as a ciasto cruche or flaky/crumbly dough in Polish, which refers to their delicate texture not that the dough is crumbly!