Fudge Brownie Pie Recipe

Alexandra Grablewski/Photolibrary/Getty Images
  • 65 mins
  • Prep: 25 mins,
  • Cook: 40 mins
  • Yield: 8 Servings
Ratings (4)

This fudge brownie pie is so rich and fudgy and an easy way to take your brownies up a notch. It doesn't seem to matter if you use a store-bought brownie mix or make the brownie filling from scratch. Each and every time you make this delicious recipe, people will flip. If you use store-bought mix, there are just six simple ingredients, making this one of the easiest fudge brownie pie recipes around. Of course, you can always add whipped cream or ice cream as well.

Are you a newbie to pie-making? You don't have to be a pie-making expert to tackle this recipe that gives an extra boost to regular brownies. This easy homemade fudge brownie pie features a golden pie crust shell filled with the gooiest, fudgiest brownie. Serve it with ice cream, whipped cream or caramel sauce for the ultimate treat!

What You'll Need

  • 1 9-inch pie shell (homemade or store-bought)
  • 1 23-ounce brownie mix (or​ homemade recipe)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 egg

How to Make It

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F.
  2. Combine brownie mix, water and egg and beat until smooth.
  3. Pour mixture into shell. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until puffed and brown. Cool.
  4. Serve warm with whipped cream or ice cream.

Variations on a Brownie Theme

Want to add a little alcohol to your brownies? Try it with rum in these Boozy Brownies. Along the lines of the Fudge Brownie Pie are these super chocolatey Chocolate Frosted Brownies.

Or jazz up your brownies with some nuts in these Carob-Peanut Butter Brownies. And if you like cheesecake and brownies, try these Cheesecake Brownies.

History of Brownies

The word "brownie" was first officially printed in 1896 in the Boston Cooking-School Cook Book. A baker baked little molasses cakes individually in tin molds. By 1907, the brownie was well established in a recognizable form, appearing in Lowney's Cook Book by Maria Willet Howard as an adaptation of the Boston Cooking School recipe for a "Bangor Brownie." It added an extra egg and an additional square of chocolate, creating a richer, fudgier dessert. The name "Bangor Brownie" appears to come from the town of Bangor, Maine.