Hippocampus Species Seahorses Pictures Gallery

  • 01 of 21

    Potbelly Seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis)

    Potbelly Seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis)
    Potbelly Seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis). Debbie Hauter

    The Big Belly or Potbelly Seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis) is one of the largest seahorse species in the world with a length of up to 35 cm. The Big Belly Seahorse is found in the waters near Australia and New Zealand among algae, seagrasses, and rocky reefs in shallow water, and attached to sponges and colonial hydroids in deeper areas.

    In the wild, these Seahorses begin breeding after they have reached one year of age. The male seahorse broods 300-700 young at a time, and can have up to four...MORE broods in a summer.

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  • 02 of 21

    Myrtle Beach Aquarium Baby Seahorses

    Baby Seahorses
    Baby Seahorses. Deb Hauter

     Seahorses are more vertically oriented than horizontally. That is to say that they like to move up and down in an aquarium more than side to side. For this reason, a seahorse tank should be at least 18 inches tall. The DIY Seahorse tank we designed and constructed had a 12" by 12" footprint and was 22 inches tall and worked very well for two Dwarfs and the Striped Mandarinfish we kept in the tank.

     

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  • 03 of 21

    Myrtle Beach Aquarium "Seahorse Tree"

    "Seahorse Tree". Deb Hauter

    Seahorse Food & Feeding

    Seahorses should be fed at least twice per day. The best food for captive bred seahorses is frozen Mysis shrimp. If you obtain an aquacultured seahorse, it is probably already eating Mysis, so getting it to eat in your tank should not be a problem. Wild caught Seahorses, on the other hand, can be difficult to get to eat hand fed foods.

    Frozen Mysis Shrimp is arguably the best food for Seahorses. Frozen Brine Shrimp would also be a good second choice, but the Mysis...MORE Shrimp appears to be higher in protein content. If you can find them, live Mysis or Brine Shrimp would also make excellent foods. A large population of either Amphipods and/or Copepods in a Seahorse tank also makes an excellent food supplement and gives the Seahorses something to do during the day (hunting for food). Culturing Amphipods and Copepods as well as Growing Out Brine Shrimp for Fish Food after you have hatched them out in a DIY Brine Shrimp Hatchery are excellent ways to always have fresh, high quality food available for your Seahorses.

     

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  • 04 of 21

    Myrtle Beach Aquarium Seahorse

    Myrtle Beach Aquarium Seahorse
    Myrtle Beach Aquarium Seahorse. Deb Hauter

    Thinking about trying your hand at keeping a few Seahorses? Introducing Seahorses to Your Saltwater Aquarium is an excellent source of information to get you started.

     

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  • 05 of 21

    Atlantic Seahorse (Hippocampus erectus)

    Seahorse in 12g DIY Seahorse Tank
    Seahorse in 12g DIY Seahorse Tank. Deb Hauter

     Deb snapped this photo of one of the Atlantic Seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) in our DIY 12g Seahorse tank.

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  • 06 of 21

    Atlantic Seahorse (Hippocampus erectus)

    Atlantic Seahorse (Hippocampus erectus)
    Atlantic Seahorse (Hippocampus erectus). Deb Hauter

    Debbie's Atlantic Seahorse (Hippocampus erectus), taken in our DIY 12g Seahorse Tank.

    The Atlantic Seahorse (Hippocampus erectus) is also known as the Lined Seahorse, Northern Seahorse or Spotted Seahorse. It is found in the Atlantic Ocean as far north as Canada and as far south as the Caribbean, Mexico, and Venezuela.

     

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  • 07 of 21

    Lined Seahorse (H. erectus) Seahorse

    Atlantic Seahorse (Hippocampus erectus)
    Atlantic Seahorse (Hippocampus erectus). Deb Hauter

    Seahorses have many colors, but like this Lined (H. erectus) seahorse that was black, they can change their color and how they look to match their surroundings.

    Why do seahorses change colors? Camouflage is the main line of defense for all seahorses, so it's not unusual for them to not only change colors, but adapt variations in their markings to match and blend into their surroundings.

    Here are two good examples of how seahorses can do this. The Lined Seahorse pictured here and the one in the...MORE next two photos are of individual Hippocampus erectus seahorses that were received at the same time. Both started out black and were placed in an aquarium together. After this one took to the artificial seaweed-like corkscrew val plant in the aquarium as its hiding place, it turned pale yellowish-green in color. What did the other Lined Seahorse do? See for yourself and Learn more about the Lined Seahorse

    While they are tenacious in their pursuit of food, Seahorses are not aggressive feeders, doing best in a tank with slower moving fish such as the Mandarin Dragonet. Slow swimming Seahorses also do not fare well in aquariums with more than a very light current. The DIY Seahorse Tank which is taller, rather than wider, was specifically designed to house a Seahorse or two and a Mandarin Dragonet.

     

     

     

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  • 08 of 21

    Lined Seahorse (Hippocampus erectus)

    Lined, Erect or Atlantic Seahorse
    Lined, Erect or Atlantic Seahorse. Deb Hauter

    Light and dark gray striped and pinkish colored, this (H. erectus) seahorse shows there's no limit to color when it comes to a seahorses camouflaging abilities.

    About the Many Colors of Seahorses: Seahorses are typically described as having general ranges of colorations. The Lined Seahorse is typically described as ranging from black to yellow in color, but you can see from this Hippocampus erectus picture, there's no limitations when to comes to colors, because seahorses are truly...MORE masters of camouflage.

     

     

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  • 09 of 21

    Lined Seahorse (Hippocampus erectus)

    Western Atlantic H. erectus species seahorse
    Western Atlantic H. erectus species seahorse. Deb Hauter

     This (H. erectus) seahorse was black, but changed to these beautiful gray and pink shades of color with dark and light markings to match its new aquarium setting.

    Interesting Seahorse Fact: When it comes to what seahorses look like, it is amazing to think about how none are alike. Even though individuals may start out black for example, each has the unique ability to adapt and change their color as well as appearance at will to match and blend into whatever is around them.

    By looking at this...MORE Lined Seahorse picture along with the two previous Hippocampus erectus photos included in this gallery of seahorse pictures, you can see for yourself just how astonishing seahorses are when it comes to the art-of-camouflage.

     

     

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  • 10 of 21

    Female Hippocamus sp. Seahorse

    Female Seahorse (Hippocampus erectus)
    Female Seahorse (Hippocampus erectus). LaTonia Hohweiler

     As another way to blend in, from this female Hippocampus seahorse photo by LaTonia Hohweiler you can see how some seahorses grow filamentous skin extensions.

    Interesting Seahorse Fact: Seahorses are masters of camouflage. To disguise themselves they not only can change their colors and markings at will to perfectly match their surroundings, but some seahorses like this female Hippocampus seahorse can grow filamentous extensions from the skin.

    Thinking about adding a Seahorse to your tank? See the...MORE Saltwater Aquarium Fish Compatibility Chart first.

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  • 11 of 21

    Cape Seahorse - Pregnant Male H. capensis

    Cape seahorse (Hippocampus capensis)
    Cape seahorse (Hippocampus capensis). Marcia Wills

     Male seahorses bear and give birth to the babies. Marcia Wills took this picture of her male Cape Seahorse (Hippocampus capensis) when he was pregnant.

    Interesting Seahorse Fact: It is male seahorses that bear and give birth to the babies, not females. The male becomes pregnant after receiving eggs into his pouch from a female during a long and fascinating to watch mating dance. Once the eggs are in the male's pouch they are then fertilized. He carries them to term, and upon contractions...MORE lots of tiny newborn baby seahorse fry burst forth and start swimming around.

     

     

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  • 12 of 21

    Dwarf Seahorse - Pregnant papa H. zosterae

    Pregnant Seahorse
    Pregnant Seahorse. S. Damian

     A pregnant male Dwarf (H. zosterae) Seahorse like any male seahorse gives birth to babies about 3 weeks after eggs are deposited into the brood pouch by a female.

    Interesting Seahorse Fact: The Hippocampus zosterae or Dwarf species seahorse grows to less than 2 inches in height. Because this seahorse is so small, when baby dwarf seahorses are born they are very tiny, like not much larger than the size of a pin head, and you have to look really close to see them.

     

     

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  • 13 of 21

    Seahorse Photo

    Baby seahorse eating a brine shrimp.
    Baby seahorse eating a brine shrimp. JGOERDT

    A photo of a 6 month old female Seahorse having lunch.

     

     

     

     

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  • 14 of 21

    2 Brazilian Seahorses

    Brazilian Seahorses
    Brazilian Seahorses. Rich DelPizzo

    The Brazilian Reidi is also known as the Longsnout Seahorse and is found in the Western Caribbean. It will get along well with small, shy fish such as Gobies, Ocellaris and Percula Clownfish, and Firefish. Aggressive, territorial fish, or fast-moving fish do not make good tank mates.

     

     

     

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  • 15 of 21

    Spiney (Hippocampus hystrix) Seahorse

    Hippocampus hystrix
    Hippocampus hystrix. Lisa Francis

    The Hippocampus hystrix Seahorse, also known as the Thorny Seahorse is widespread throughout the Indo-Pacific. This species favors relatively deep waters (10–95 m) and is usually found below 15 m depths.

     

     

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  • 16 of 21

    Panamic Seahorse (Hippocampus ingens).

    Panamic Seahorse
    Panamic Seahorse. Keoki Stender

    Keoki snapped this picture of a Panamic Seahorse (Hippocampus ingens) off the west coast of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. Hippocampus ingens is uncommonly found in seaweed and dead coral off the west coast of Central America.

     

     

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  • 17 of 21

    Smooth Seahorse (Hippocampus kuda)

    Smooth Seahorse (Hippocampus kuda)
    Smooth Seahorse (Hippocampus kuda). Keoki Stender

     This Smooth Seahorse (Hippocampus kuda) picture taken at the Waikiki Aquarium.

    The Smooth Seahorse (Hippocampus kuda) inhabits bays and estuaries but rarely seen, probably due to its ability to camouflage itself to blend in with its surroundings.

     

     

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  • 18 of 21

    Gorgonian Pygmy Seahorse (Hippocampus bargibanti)

    Gorgonian Pygmy Seahorse
    Gorgonian Pygmy Seahorse. Denny Ludlow

    The Gorgonian Pygmy Seahorse (Hippocampus bargibanti) is found on Red Sea Fan corals from Indonesia to New Caledonia. It attains a size of only about 1 inch.

     

     

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  • 19 of 21

    Plucked Chicken Pygmy Seahorse (Hippocampus denise)

    Plucked Chicken Pygmy Seahorse
    Plucked Chicken Pygmy Seahorse. Keoki Stender

    The amazing Plucked Chicken Pygmy Seahorse (Hippocampus denise) is found (oddly enough, very rarely) on Orange Sea Fans in the Indo-Malayan region. Keoki snapped this picture at 75 feet off the coast of Wakatobi, Indonesia.

     

     

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  • 20 of 21

    Ocean Rider Brazilero (Hippocampus Redii) Seahorse

    Ocean Rider Brazilero (Hippocampus Redii) Seahorse
    Ocean Rider Brazilero (Hippocampus Redii) Seahorse. Jamie Myer

    Ocean Rider  Brazilero (Hippocampus Redii) Seahorses are farm bred and raised on the Big Island in Hawaii.

     

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  • 21 of 21

    Smooth Seahorse (Hippocampus kuda)

    Smooth Seahorse (Hippocampus kuda)
    Smooth Seahorse (Hippocampus kuda). Keoki Stender

    This Smooth Seahorse (Hippocampus kuda) picture, taken at the Waikiki Aquarium.

    The Smooth Seahorse (Hippocampus kuda) inhabits bays and estuaries but rarely is seen, probably due to its ability to camouflage itself to blend in with its surroundings. The Smooth Seahorse is a popular addition to the DIY Seahorse Tank.