Holiday Crochet Scarf Designs

  • 01 of 06

    Scarves for Christmas, Valentine's Day and Independence Day

    Holiday Crochet Scarf Designs - Valentine Scarf, Christmas Scarf, and Fourth of July Scarf
    Holiday Crochet Scarf Designs - From Left to Right: Valentine Scarf, Christmas Scarf, and Fourth of July Scarf. Photo © Amy Solovay

    Festive scarves put you in the mood for the holidays.

    Pictured above, from left to right: several holiday scarves for Valentine's Day, Christmas, and Fourth of July. You could make these scarves for any holiday or occasion by changing out the colors.

    Get the Free Holiday Scarf Patterns:

    • Valentine Scarf - This scarf is crocheted in red, pink and white yarn, all of which are popular Valentine colors. The great thing ab
    • out this scarf is that you could wear it all year long; I debated whether to call...MORE it the "Strawberry Shortcake scarf," and debut it for springtime wear. I decided I like it best for Valentine's Day, but it's a toss-up. If you live in an area that gets really cold during the month of February, this scarf might not be warm or heavy enough to suffice for outerwear, but it's a great scarf to wear indoors during the day; it'll look great at work, and also to wear out to dinner afterwards.
    • Christmas Scarf - The Christmas version of the scarf is crocheted in red, white and green yarns. If you'd rather make a scarf in Rasta colors, you could easily change out the white for a yellow yarn (perhaps Sprout color #4350, Evening Primrose?)

      For those of you who celebrate Christmas and enjoy crocheting your Christmas gifts, this is a great pattern to have in your stash; it's a pattern you can work during the spring or summer to get a jump start on your holiday crafting.
    • Fourth of July Scarf - Some of you live in areas where it would be way too hot to even consider wearing scarves on the Fourth of July. However, some of you - Californians, I'm looking at you especially - could use a lightweight scarf like this one after sundown, when the temperature has dropped and you're likely to be cold outside while enjoying the fireworks.

      Those of you who live outside the USA are invited to consider making this design in your own country's colors. It might also be nice made up in the colors of your favorite sports team; you could wear it to their games. Or just pick three colors you like! There are many fun possibilities.
    Continue to 2 of 6 below.
  • 02 of 06

    Crochet Christmas Scarf Pattern

    Crochet Christmas Scarf Pattern
    Crochet Christmas Scarf Pattern. Photo © Amy Solovay

    This Christmas scarf is quick to crochet, thanks to chunky yarn and the use of easy crochet stitches. It's a festive design you'll love wearing, and it's also an ideal project for gift-giving too.

    Skill Level: Easy

    Materials:

    Yarn:

    For my sample scarf, I used Sprout organic cotton yarn by Classic Elite. This is a chunky textured yarn that is machine washable. I used the following colors of Sprout yarn to crochet the sample scarf:

    • Salvia red, color #4358
    • Galapagos green, color #4335
    • Summer cloud,...MORE (white) color #4301

    Click here for more information about Sprout yarn.

    One hank of each color was more than enough to crochet the sample scarf. The total scarf weight is about 2.25 ounces / 63.5 grams.

    I used a size J / 6.0 mm crochet hook to crochet the sample scarf. Use either this size hook or whatever size you need to get the correct gauge.

    Other: Tapestry Needle for weaving in ends and adding hand-stitched details to the scarf

    Finished Size/Gauge:

    The finished scarf measures approximately 4.5 inches by approximately 38 inches. The row gauge is not critical for this pattern; the stitch gauge is more important. To crochet a scarf measuring 38 inches long, you'll have a gauge of approximately 13 stitches per five inches.

    If you'd like to crochet a shorter scarf, measuring approximately 36 inches, you could work at a gauge of 11 stitches per 4 inches.

    I wouldn't recommend making the scarf any shorter than that; it could be made longer if you like, assuming you have enough yarn to crochet a longer scarf. Be sure to check your gauge to make sure your scarf will turn out to be a usable size.

    Abbreviations Used in This Pattern:

    Pattern Design Notes:

    To change colors, work up through the last step of the last stitch in the old color, then complete the last step of the last stitch in the new color. See a tutorial here: how to change colors.

    After each color change, you'll want to cut the old color.

    If you crochet tightly, I recommend crocheting overtop of your yarn ends as you change colors in this pattern. That will help you to secure the ends, and at the same time it will eliminate the need for you to do so much weaving in. If you crochet very loosely, it might be better for you to weave in your ends to make sure they are secure; you don't want them to come sneaking back out as the scarf is worn or laundered.

    Christmas Scarf Instructions:

    Using red yarn, ch 100. When you work row 1, you may wish to crochet into the backs of these chain stitches, leaving both the front and back loops free; I mention this because later when you add the edging, this will make it easier for you to work back across your starting chain.

    Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook and each st after.
    ch 3, turn.
    Row 2: Work entire row in dc. At the end of the row, change colors to green.
    ch 1, turn.
    Row 3: dc in first st, sl st in next st, (dc in next st, sl st in next st,) repeat sequence in parentheses all the way across the row. At the end of the row, change colors to white.
    ch 3, turn.
    Row 4: Work entire row in dc. At the end of the row, change colors to green.
    ch 1, turn.
    Row 5: Repeat row 3. At the end of the row, change colors to red.
    ch 3, turn.
    Row 6: Work entire row in dc.
    ch 1, turn.
    Row 7: Work entire row in sc. At end of row, change colors to green for edging.
    ch 1, turn.

    Scarf Edging:

    Row 8: sl st in first st. (Skip next st, 5 hdc in next st, skip next st, sl st in next st.) Repeat sequence in parentheses all the way across the row. You'll end this row with a sl st. End off and weave in the end.

    Row 9: Turn the scarf over so that you can work back across your starting chain. Attach the green yarn with a slip knot. Repeat row 8, except that you can skip making the first slip knot in the first stitch; after that, just copy row 8 all the way to the end of the row.

    How to Finish the Christmas Scarf:

    End off; weave in any remaining loose ends.

    Thread a tapestry needle with a long length of white yarn; for best results, use a length that is at least 10 or 12 inches longer than the scarf. When you begin stitching, leave a tail of at least 5-6 inches hanging at the end of the scarf; when you are finished stitching, you will weave this end in as you would with any other loose end.

    Working between rows 6 and 7, hand stitch as evenly as possible along the entire length of the scarf. I used a modified version of running stitch; I did my running stitches by weaving the yarn over one crochet stitch and under the next crochet stitch. Feel free to experiment with this if you want to; I purposely chose a simple stitch to keep things quick and easy, but would love to work this pattern again in order to try out a few other interesting stitches and effects. Whichever stitch you choose, repeat it again on the other side of the scarf; note that an exact mirror image is challenging to achieve due to the way the rows are structured; in the end, I gave up on getting an exact mirror image, and ended up working between rows 1 and 2.

    Weave in these ends and any other remaining loose ends.

    Block if desired. The scarf is now ready for wearing, or gift-giving. Enjoy!

    References

    When designing and writing up this Christmas scarf pattern, I used the following resources:

    • The Harmony Guide to Crochet Stitches
      Sylvia Cosh and James Walters
      1986 Lyric Books Limited
      ISBN# 0 7111 0028 4
      Rows 3 and 5 of the scarf are a stitch they present in this book, called "floret stitch."
    • Weaving yarn through your stitches isn't a new idea, and I wasn't the first to come up with it. It's been awhile since I first learned about the idea, but I think I first discovered it in some of the old Mon Tricot stitch dictionaries and manuals. The Mon Tricot Special Knit and Crochet book refers to this technique as "horizontal weaving."
    • There are other ways to approach woven crochet as well. There was also an entire book devoted to woven crochet, which I believe was a Mon Tricot publication. I can't remember the exact name of it, and can't find any copies for sale online at the moment. I used to own a copy of the book but sold it because I thought it was rather boring. In hindsight, I wish I had it back because I'd love to revisit the projects included in the book.
    • Crochet Master Class is another great resource for learning about woven crochet. The book covers many different topics, but the relevant article and pattern given in the book are by Jenny King.
    • Sprout yarn labels
    Continue to 3 of 6 below.
  • 03 of 06

    Close-Up Picture of the Christmas Scarf

    Detail of the Crochet Christmas Scarf
    Detail of the Crochet Christmas Scarf. Picture © Amy Solovay

    This picture gives you a close look at a crocheted Christmas scarf you can make using a free crochet pattern from our website. This design is part of a collection of holiday scarves; be sure to check out the Valentine scarf and the Fourth of July scarf, too.

    This scarf is crocheted using a chunky cotton yarn called Sprout by Classic Elite. It's a quick, easy, fun project to crochet.

    Continue to 4 of 6 below.
  • 04 of 06

    Valentine Scarf Pattern

    Valentine Scarf Pattern
    Valentine Scarf Pattern. Photo © Amy Solovay

    If you'd like to crochet a pretty scarf to wear on Valentine's Day, this one is a great choice. I crocheted my sample scarf in Valentine-friendly colors - red, white and pink. It's easy to make color changes if you'd rather crochet a scarf for a different occasion, or if Valentine colors aren't your thing.

    Be sure to check out the Fourth of July scarf, which is a re-colored version of this pattern; the Christmas scarf pattern is a similar design made using different colors of the same yarn. The...MORE yarn I used comes in a delightful palette of colors, and there are many other interesting colorways you could come up with if you want to personalize your scarf a bit more.

    Skill Level: Easy

    Supplies:

    Yarn:

    Recommended yarn: Classic Elite's organic cotton called "Sprout," which is from the "Verde" collection. This yarn is machine washable. It is a chunky weight yarn. Feel free to substitute yarns if you can find another yarn that will give you the same gauge. I used the following colors of Sprout yarn to crochet the sample scarf:

    • Salvia red, color #4358
    • Candy tuft, (pink) color #4389
    • Summer cloud, (white) color #4301

    One hank of each color was plenty to crochet the sample scarf.

    Want to see a picture of Sprout yarn, or find out where to buy the yarn? Check out this page: Sprout yarn information

    I used a size J / 6.0 mm crochet hook to crochet the sample scarf. Use either this size hook or whatever size you need to get the correct gauge.

    Finished Size/Gauge:

    The finished scarf measures approximately 4.5" by approximately 38". The row gauge is not critical for this pattern; the stitch gauge is more important. To crochet a scarf measuring 38" long, you'll have a gauge of approximately 13 sts per five inches.

    To make a shorter scarf measuring 36", you could work at a gauge of 11 stitches per 4 inches.

    I wouldn't recommend making the scarf any shorter than that; it could be made longer if you like, assuming you have enough yarn to complete a longer scarf. Be sure to check your gauge to make sure your scarf will turn out to be a usable size.

    Crochet Abbreviations You'll Need for This Pattern:

    Design Notes:

    You'll be starting this scarf in the center and working long horizontal rows upwards. Then you'll flip the scarf over so that you can work back across the starting chain to create a mirror image of the first half of the scarf.

    When changing colors, work up through the last step of the last stitch in the old color, then work the last step of the last stitch in the new color. See complete instructions with pictures here: changing colors in crochet.

    Cut the old color after each color change.

    To save time, you can crochet over your yarn ends after each color change. That will help you to secure the ends, while eliminating the need to do so much weaving in of ends. Be aware that this technique works better for people who crochet tightly, and might not be effective for crocheters who work loosely.

    Directions for Crocheting the Valentine Scarf:

    Using white yarn, ch 100. Optional: When crocheting the first row, you might want to work into the back part of these chain stitches, leaving both the front and back loops free; later, you'll appreciate having those loops free when you crochet the second half of the scarf.

    Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook and across the entire row.
    ch 1, turn.
    Row 2: Work this whole row in sc. At the end of the row, change colors to pink.
    ch 3, turn.
    Row 3: Skip first st, (dc in next st, sl st in next st.) Repeat sequence in parentheses all the way across the row. At the end of the row, change colors to red.
    ch 3, turn.
    Row 4: Work this whole row in dc. At the end of the row, change colors to white.
    ch 1, turn.
    Row 5: Work this whole row in sc. At the end of the row, change colors to pink.
    ch 1, turn.
    Row 6: Edging Row - sl st in first st. (Skip next st, 5 hdc in next st, skip next st, sl st in next st.) Keep repeating the sequence in parentheses until you have completed the row. You'll end this edging row with a sl st. End off and weave in ends.
    Row 7: Turn the scarf over so that you can work back across your foundation chain. Attach the white yarn with a slip knot. Repeat row 2.
    Row 8: Repeat row 3.
    Row 9: Repeat row 4.
    Row 10: Repeat row 5.
    Row 11: Repeat row 6.

    Finishing the Valentine Scarf:

    Finish off; secure and weave in loose ends. Blocking is optional.

    References:

    The following works were used as references to create this Valentine scarf pattern:

    • The Harmony Guide to Crochet Stitches
      James Walters and Sylvia Cosh
      1986 Lyric Books Limited
      ISBN# 0 7111 0028 4
    • "Floret stitch" from this book is used in rows 3 and 8 of the Valentine scarf.
    • Classic Elite yarn labels for the Sprout yarn
    Continue to 5 of 6 below.
  • 05 of 06

    Fourth of July Scarf Pattern

    Fourth of July Scarf
    Fourth of July Scarf. Photo © Amy Solovay

    This eye-catching scarf is crocheted in red, white and blue. You can wear it with pride all year long, or make it especially for Fourth of July. I chose a chunky textured organic cotton yarn for this scarf; in some parts of the USA, the temperature drops enough after sundown for a cotton scarf like this one to be wearable even during the month of July.

    If you live in an area where July weather is hot and humid 24 hours a day, you might want to make this kind of scarf for a different occasion;...MORE perhaps try the Christmas version or the Valentine version. Also, feel free to re-color the design; it would be a great project to crochet for team sports enthusiasts because you can crochet the scarf using yarns in your favorite team's colors.

    Skill Level: Easy

    Supplies:

    Yarn:

    You'll need a chunky textured cotton yarn, such as Classic Elite's organic cotton yarn called "Sprout." Feel free to make substitutions if there's a different yarn you'd rather use; for best results, try to find another yarn that will give you the same gauge.

    I used the following colors of Sprout yarn to crochet the sample scarf:

    • Salvia red, color #4358
    • Baby blue eyes, color #4357
    • Summer cloud, (white) color #4301

    One hank of each color was more than needed to crochet the sample scarf.

    Learn more about Sprout yarn and see a picture at this page: Sprout yarn information

    I used a size J / 6.0 mm crochet hook to crochet the sample scarf. Use either this size hook or whatever size you need to get the correct gauge.

    Finished Size/Gauge:

    The finished scarf measures approximately 4.5 inches by approximately 38 inches. The row gauge is not critical for this pattern; the stitch gauge is more important. To crochet a scarf measuring 38 inches long, you'll have a gauge of approximately 13 stitches per five inches.

    If you'd like to crochet a shorter scarf, measuring approximately 36 inches, you could work at a gauge of 11 stitches per 4 inches.

    I wouldn't recommend making the scarf any shorter than that; it could be made longer if you like, assuming you have enough yarn to crochet a longer scarf. Check your gauge to ensure that your scarf will turn out to be the correct size. Change hooks if necessary to achieve the correct gauge.

    Design Notes:

    You'll crochet this scarf in long horizontal rows, starting at the center; then you'll flip the scarf over in order to work back across the foundation chain. The second half of the scarf is a mirror image of the first half.

    When changing colors, work up through the last step of the last stitch in the old color, then work the last step of the last stitch in the new color. See a tutorial with photos and instructions here: how to change colors.

    Cut the old color after each color change.

    Crocheting over the yarn ends after each color change might save you some time. It's a technique that can help you to avoid excessive weaving in of ends. Be aware that this technique works better for crafters who crochet tightly, and might not be effective for people who crochet loosely.

    Directions for Crocheting the Fourth of July Scarf:

    Using white yarn, ch 100. Optional: When crocheting the first row, you might want to work into the back part of your ch sts, leaving both the front and back loops free; later, when you work row 7, you'll appreciate having those loops free.

    Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook; work the rest of the row in sc st.
    ch 1, turn.
    Row 2: Work this whole row in sc. At the end of the row, change colors to blue.
    ch 3, turn.
    Row 3: Skip first st, (dc in next st, sl st in next st.) Repeat sequence in parentheses all the way across the row. At the end of the row, change colors to red.
    ch 3, turn.
    Row 4: Work this whole row in dc. At the end of the row, change colors to white.
    ch 1, turn.
    Row 5: Work this whole row in sc. At the end of the row, change colors to blue.
    ch 1, turn.
    Row 6: Edging Row - sl st in first st. (Skip next st, 5 hdc in next st, skip next st, sl st in next st.) Repeat the sequence in parentheses across the entire row. End the row with a sl st. End off and weave in ends.
    Row 7: Turn the scarf over so that you can work back across your starting chain. Attach the white yarn with a slip knot. Repeat row 2.
    Row 8: Repeat row 3.
    Row 9: Repeat row 4.
    Row 10: Repeat row 5.
    Row 11: Repeat row 6.

    Finishing the Fourth of July Scarf:

    Finish off; secure and weave in loose ends. Blocking is optional.

    References:

    I consulted the following resources when designing this Fourth of July scarf pattern:

    • The Harmony Guide to Crochet Stitches
      James Walters and Sylvia Cosh
      1986 Lyric Books Limited
      ISBN# 0 7111 0028 4
    • "Floret stitch" from this stitch dictionary is used in rows 3 and 8 of the Fourth of July scarf.
    • Classic Elite yarn labels for the Sprout yarn
    Continue to 6 of 6 below.
  • 06 of 06

    Photo of Sprout Organic Cotton Yarn by Classic Elite

    Sprout Organic Cotton Yarn by Classic Elite
    Sprout Organic Cotton Yarn by Classic Elite. Photo © Amy Solovay

    Pictured here: several different colors of Classic Elite's chunky, textured organic cotton yarn from the "Verde" collection. The name of this yarn is "Sprout." This is the yarn I used to create my sample holiday scarves; the free scarf patterns are linked below.

    From left to right, the Sprout yarn colors shown in the photo are as follows:

    • Galapagos green, color #4335
    • Candy tuft, (pink) color #4389
    • Summer cloud, (white) color #4301
    • Salvia red, color #4358
    • Baby blue eyes, color #4357

    Please note: I have...MORE tried to represent the colors as accurately as possible in these photographs; however, since browsers all display colors a bit differently, and individual computer monitor settings vary, it is impossible for me to guarantee that you're viewing the colors with total accuracy.

    Where to Buy Sprout Yarn: If you'd like to shop for this yarn, these resources will help:

    Free Crochet Patterns Featuring Sprout Yarn:

    • Square wine bottle cover

    More Yarn Info: