How and When to Harvest Cucumbers

Guidelines for harvesting cucumbers destined for pickles and salads

Full Frame Shot Of Cucumbers For Sale At Market
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You know summer has arrived when your lunch consists of a salad with crisp cucumbers and your go-to breakfast is a feta and cucumber sandwich. Cucumbers require a long growing season, and most are ready for harvest in 50 to 70 days from planting. The fruits ripen at different times on the vine, but it is essential to pick them when they are ready to avoid a bitter flavor that develops in cucumbers that are left on the vine too long.

There are two types of cucumbers: small pickling types that are bumpy and rough and large slicing varieties that are meant to be eaten fresh. Seed packets list the approximate size of the cucumbers and the number of days until harvest from the germination date, which gives you a general idea of when they will be ready to harvest. Watch for the first female flowers to open—they're the ones with the miniature cucumber right beneath the flower—and expect ripe fruit in 8 to 10 days. Check the vines daily after they start to produce. Cucumbers grow quickly.

A cucumber is ready when it is the size and color of a ripe cucumber of its variety. Most cucumbers develop a deep green color, but some cultivars have a white or yellow tint or a dappled appearance, so check the tag or seed packet. The best time to harvest cucumbers depends in large part on the variety you are growing and how you plan to use the cucumbers.

Here are some general guidelines:

Harvesting Cucumbers for Pickling

If you are harvesting pickling cucumbers to make sweet pickles or gherkins, harvest them when they are about 2 inches long.

If you plan to make dill pickles, a good rule of thumb is to harvest when the cucumbers are 3 to 4 inches long.

Harvesting for Fresh Eating

Most slicing cucumbers for fresh eating should be harvested when they are 7 to 9 inches long and have a bright dark green color. If they get much larger than this, they'll be bitter and won't have a pleasant texture.

Burpless cucumbers are best harvested when they reach about 1.5 inches in diameter.

How to Harvest Cucumbers

When you pick cucumbers, leave a small, 1-inch section of stem attached to the cucumber. This prevents the stem end from rotting in storage if you won't be using the cucumber right away. The easiest way to do this, and the least stressful for the plant, is to cut the cucumber off the vine with a sharp knife or pruners. If you twist or pull on the vine, the plant can be damaged.

The burpless varieties of cucumbers are susceptible to bruising. Lay them gently in a container as you gather the ripe fruit.

Wear gloves when you harvest cucumbers. Some of them are prickly. If the cucumbers have a lot of spines, remove them by rubbing a cloth or vegetable brush along the length of the fruit.

Extending Cucumber Season

Some people leave cucumbers on the vine and let them grow as large as they can, but the flavor is better if they are harvested earlier.

Picking the cucumbers as soon as they are ready encourages the plant to produce longer into the season. To extend the season:

  • Sow seeds indoors to have plants ready when the temperature heats up. Cucumbers are warm weather plants and you can't sow seed outdoors early.
  • Plant two or three varieties of cucumbers that have a different number of days to maturity.
  • Remove damaged fruit from the vine, so the plant doesn't waste any energy on it.

You can keep cucumbers in the refrigerator for about a week, but the flavor is best soon after you pick them.