How to Get Blood Stains Out of Carpet

Blood stain on carpet

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Project Overview
  • Working Time: 10 - 20 mins
  • Total Time: 1 hr, 15 mins - 8 hrs
  • Skill Level: Beginner
  • Estimated Cost: $5 to 10

Blood stains on a carpet from cuts, menstrual cycles, food preparation, or pets are common. Treating blood stains is pretty simple, as long as you get to them quickly and use the right products and techniques.

Read on to learn the best methods for removing fresh and dried blood stains from carpets.

 Stain Type  Protein
 Detergent Type  Hydrogen peroxide, oxygen-based bleach, dishwashing liquid
 Water Temperature  Cold or cool
Cycle Type for Washable Carpets Bulky items, normal

When to Call a Professional

If the blood stain is large and the blood has seeped into the carpet padding or the stain has dried and not been treated for several weeks, it's time to call a professional. The situation may be considered a biohazard and require remediation or complete removal of the carpet.

What You'll Need

Equipment / Tools

  • 2 small buckets
  • 1 stiff-bristled nylon brush
  • 1 soft-bristled nylon brush
  • 1 microfiber cloth
  • 1 vacuum

Materials

  • 1 bottle hydrogen peroxide
  • 1 container powdered oxygen-based bleach
  • cold water
  • 1 roll paper towels
  • 1 pair disposable gloves
  • 1 container dishwashing liquid

Instructions

How to Remove Fresh Blood Stains from Synthetic Fiber Carpet

You may clean bloodstains on the carpet and upholstery the same way unless the upholstery is vintage or silk. Take extra care not to over-wet the fabric, which can create damaging excess moisture in cushions.

  1. Blot Away the Blood

    Wearing disposable or washable gloves, use several layers of paper towels to blot up as much blood as possible.

  2. Mix a Cleaning Solution

    In a small bowl or bucket, mix a solution of one teaspoon of dishwashing liquid and two cups of cool water. Prepare a second bucket with about two cups of plain water.

  3. Treat the Stain

    • Dip a soft-bristled nylon brush into the solution.
    • Start at the outside edge of the stain and work toward the center to keep the stain from spreading.
    • Scrub gently and blot repeatedly with the paper towels as the blood is diluted. The towels will lift it from the fibers.
    • When no more color is transferred to the towels, use a microfiber cloth dipped in plain water to rinse the carpet.
    • Blot with paper towels until no more moisture is transferred to the towels.
    • Allow the area to air-dry.
  4. Remove Traces of Color

    If the carpeting is white or light beige, there may be traces of color left in the fibers.

    • Mix a solution of powdered oxygen-based bleach and warm water following the directions on the label. You'll need about one cup of water.
    • Apply the solution to the remaining stain with a microfiber cloth. Do not rinse.
    • Allow the area to air-dry.
    • Vacuum the carpet to lift the fibers.
    • Repeat this step, if needed, until no more traces of color remain.

    Tip

    Always allow the carpet to air-dry without adding extra heat like a hairdryer or direct sunlight. If you need to speed drying, add a circulating fan to increase the airflow in the room.

How to Remove Fresh Blood Stains from Wool Carpet

  1. Blot Away the Blood

    Wearing disposable or washable gloves, use several layers of paper towels to blot up as much blood as possible.

  2. Mix a Cleaning Solution and Treat the Stain

    In a small bowl or bucket, mix a solution of one teaspoon of dishwashing liquid and two cups of cool water. Prepare a second bucket with about two cups of plain water.

    • Dip a soft-bristled nylon brush into the solution.
    • Start at the outside edge of the stain and work toward the center to keep the stain from spreading.
    • Scrub gently and blot repeatedly with the paper towels as the blood is diluted and transferred to the towels.
    • When no more color appears, use a microfiber cloth dipped in plain water to rinse the carpet.
    • Blot until no more moisture is transferred to the towels.
    • Allow the air to air-dry.
  3. Remove Traces of Color

    If the wool carpeting is white or light beige, you can use hydrogen peroxide to remove the traces of color left in the fibers. Do not use oxygen-based bleach that can harm wool fibers. Be sure that your bottle of hydrogen peroxide is fresh. There should be fizzing when it reacts with the remaining blood in the carpet.

    • Use a microfiber cloth to apply hydrogen peroxide to the stained area.
    • Do not rinse.
    • Allow the area to air-dry.
    • Vacuum the carpet to lift the fibers.
    • Repeat this step, if needed, until no more traces of color remain.

How to Remove Dried Blood Stains on Carpet

  1. Remove Solids

    If the blood has dried, while wearing gloves, use a stiff-bristled nylon brush to loosen the dried blood from the fibers. Vacuum the loose particles away.

  2. Treat the Stains

    Follow the same steps recommended for removing fresh blood. Apply the cleaning solution and let it sit for at least five minutes before you begin scrubbing. You may need to scrub and blot a bit longer or repeat the steps to remove dried blood from the carpet.

  3. Remove the Final Traces

    • Following the steps recommended for fresh blood stains, use an oxygen-based bleach solution on synthetic carpet fibers - polyester, olefin, acrylic - to remove residual stains from light-colored carpet.
    • Follow the hydrogen peroxide guidelines for fresh blood stains to remove dried blood discoloration from wool carpets.

Tips to Remove Blood Stains from Carpet

Here are some tips to ensure you get the best results:

  • Don't waste time. Treat the blood stains as quickly as you can for easier removal.
  • Don't use hot water to treat the stains. Hot water "cooks" the proteins in the blood making the stain more difficult to remove.
  • Don't guess about the type of fibers used to make your carpet. Wool, a natural fiber, must be treated differently from synthetic fibers like polyester, acrylics, and olefin.