How to Get Married In Oregon

Rowena Crest , Columbia River Gorge, Oregon
Balsamroot wildflowers at Rowena Crest, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Oregon. Photo: Alan Majchrowicz / The Image Bank / Getty Images

Applying for a marriage license in Oregon requires that you go to the local county clerk office. While the fees and registration requirements may vary from one county to another, these are the marriage laws that apply to the entire state. Due to the waiting period in Oregon, it's best to plan ahead and take care of this legal obligation within 30 days of your wedding ceremony.

Residency and ID Requirements

You do not have to be a resident of Oregon. However, you will need to provide a driver's license or some sort of valid identification card. Social Security numbers are not necessarily required; you can choose "None," "Uknown", or "Refused" on the marriage license application.

Additionally, the license application will ask for information about both sets of parents. Be prepared with your parents' names at birth as well as the state or country they were born in. This information is used to verify your identity.

Previous Marriages

You only have to wait one day after your divorce is final to get remarried. The date of the final divorce decree is needed for the marriage license application. Some counties may require a copy of the final divorce decree as well.

Waiting Period

There is a three day waiting period in Oregon after you have applied for the license. You cannot have a ceremony before this date. Some counties may waive the waiting fee for an additional payment fee.

Fees

It will cost you around $60 to get married in Oregon, and it does vary by county. Cash is required in most counties.

Same-Sex Marriage

In May 2014, U.S. District Judge Michael McShane ruled that the 2004 same-sex marriage ban was unconstitutional. Additionally, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the case of Obergefell vs. Hodges in June 2015. This stated that same-sex couples could not be denied the right to marry, thereby legalizing same-sex marriages at the national level.

Under 18

If you aren't 17 years of age, you cannot get married in Oregon. Individuals 17 years of age will need parental consent. The consenting parent or guardian must accompany the applicant when applying for the marriage license. There is no waiver for anyone under the age of 17.

Cousin Marriage

Marriage to a first cousin, or any relative closer than that, is not allowed in Oregon. The only exception is if you're cousins through adoption.

Common-Law Marriage

Oregon does not authorize common-law marriages unless it meets the requirements of another state where it has been recognized for the couple.

Proxy Marriage

Proxy marriages are not allowed in Oregon, so both parties must be present.

Officiants

Judges, County Clerks or their Deputies, Justices of Peace, and members of the clergy may perform wedding ceremonies in Oregon. There is also a provision in the law that allows someone authorized by a secular organization to be an officiant.

Miscellaneous

A marriage license issued in Oregon is valid for 60 days. There is an expiration date listed on the license. If you do not get married within this period, you will need to apply for a new marriage license and pay the fee again.

Copy of Certificate of Marriage

You can order a copy of a marriage certificate through the Vital Records department of the Oregon Health Authority. A valid identification and Social Security number may be required.

The request may be done online or over the phone and will be mailed to you within three business days. You can also request it through the mail, which can take three to five weeks to process, though there is a rush service available.

Additionally, you can request a copy in person at the Oregon Vital Records Office in Portland. This option allows you to get the license the same day, typically within one hour.

Please Note

State and county marriage license requirements do change often. The above information is for guidance only and should not be regarded as legal advice.

It is important that you verify all information with your local marriage license office or county clerk before making any wedding or travel plans.