How to Get Slime Out of Carpet in No Time

Slimy mess? Don't fret

Girl stretching slime

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Project Overview
  • Working Time: 10 - 30 mins
  • Total Time: 10 - 30 mins
  • Skill Level: Beginner
  • Estimated Cost: $0 to 10

Slime used to be a mysterious green substance reserved for pranks on Nickelodeon. Today, slime is one of the most popular kids' toys around, and for good reason—it comes in all different colors and is a science experiment, an art project, and a boredom buster all at the same time.

Whether you have little ones at home or you're an enthusiast yourself, slime can be oh-so-fun to make and play with. When smushed and smashed in between hands, slime sticks to itself and doesn't make a mess. However, when it comes into contact with fabrics and textures like carpet, slime can be at best a nuisance and at worst a nightmare.

If you find yourself staring down at a slimy mess on your carpet, don't panic. Slime is relatively easy to remove if you have to right tools, patience, and a touch of elbow grease. Follow the simple steps below and your carpet will be slime-free in no time.

Before You Begin

The easiest way to tackle a slime stain is to first pick up as much of the sticky substance as you can. First, this will make the spot less challenging to clean. Additionally, it will also prevent the carpet from getting deeper stains as the slime sits.

What You'll Need

Equipment / Tools

  • 1 spray bottle
  • 1 spoon or butter knife

Materials

  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 1 cup water

Instructions

How to Successfully Get Slime Out of Carpet

  1. Scrape Up the Excess Slime

    Grab your spoon or butter knife and gently scrape the excess slime out of the carpet. The key word here is gently. Try not to press too hard—you don’t want to push the slime even deeper into the fiber of the carpet. You’ll be able to remove almost all the slime this way.

    Once you’re done scraping, you can then address the stain and stubborn slime specks that are left over.

  2. Create Dissolving Solution

    To get the slime stuck deeper in the fibers, create a simple cleaning solution with items that you likely already have in your kitchen.

    Grab a spray bottle and create a mixture of one part water to two parts white vinegar. Give the bottle a good shake to make sure the solution is adequately mixed.

    Tip

    Vinegar contains acetic acid, which actually dissolves the slime left in your carpet, making it much easier to blot up.

  3. Spray the Slime Spot

    Using the spray bottle, saturate the spot with your vinegar solution. Let it sit for five to ten minutes, allowing the acidic vinegar to dissolve the slime.

    Keep your eye on the spot and take note of if you need to spray a bit more to get the slime to break down to liquid. If the slime is very stubborn, you can also try adding a bit of rubbing alcohol to speed up the process.

  4. Blot Up the Remaining Stain

    Once you can see that the slime has dissolved, grab a clean white towel or paper towel. Gently blot the stain to pick up the rest of the stain and dry the spot. Check your work as you go and repeat if necessary.

    The solution should have been diluted enough to avoid a residual vinegar smell, but if you do detect some odor, just grab a fresh rag and blot the spot with water to rinse.

  5. Run Over the Spot With a Vacuum

    Once you’re done, vacuum over the spot to pick up any loose bits that may not have completely dissolved. This will also help to dry out and fluff up your carpet so it's restored to normal.

Tips For Getting Slime Out of Your Carpet

  • As with all spills and stains, the faster you can address it, the better.
  • Dried slime is easier to pick up than wet slime, but letting slime dry out often takes several days. If you have a light or even neutral-colored carpet, letting the slime sit for that long could result in a really stubborn stain underneath. It’s ideal to address the issue as soon as you notice it for the best results.
  • Do not wipe the area—make sure you blot. Wiping your carpet, especially when you’re frantically trying to clean up a stain, can ruin the fibers and cause an even bigger problem than before.