How to Hold a Crochet Hook

  • 01 of 07

    Learn Several Ways to Hold a Crochet Hook.

    Crocheting together a cushion cover
    Ruth Jenkinson / Getty Images

    There are bunches of different ways you could hold a crochet hook and yarn, but most of the time, crocheters fall into either of two groups: the pencil grippers and the knife grippers.


    • The Knife-Grippers: Don't let the name scare you; there are no knives necessary here! We refer to the "knife grip" because this way of holding the crochet hook is similar to holding a dinner knife. This is an overhand grip that gives you about as much control over the work as you have when you're...MORE cutting your food with a knife. Knife-grippers claim that this method is the easiest on the hands; critics claim that it is less precise than the pencil grip. I personally dislike this way because I find it more awkward to hold my work when I use it. One exception would be when I am working with really large crochet hooks (in the range of 11 millimeters or thereabouts.) For working with large hooks, I find the knife grip more comfortable.​
    • The Pencil-Grippers: When you hold your crochet hook in much the same way you'd hold a pencil or pen, we call it the "pencil grip." The pencil grip gives you about as much control over your work as you would have when writing with a pencil or pen, or when painting with a paintbrush.​
    • How to Hold a Tunisian Crochet Hook: Tunisian crochet hooks are a little different than traditional crochet hooks. Since there's a different set of considerations for this technique, you might find that it's more comfortable to hold the hook a little differently than you would hold a traditional crochet hook. If you want to learn Tunisian crochet. an overhand grip similar to the knife grip is far preferable for that technique.

    More Crochet Help for Beginners:


    Continue to 2 of 7 below.
  • 02 of 07

    Holding a Crochet Hook With the Pencil Grip

    I usually use the pencil grip for holding my crochet hook. In the upper photo above, you can see a close-up view of this. In the lower photo above, you can see a zoomed-out view of me holding a crochet project.


    As you can see, I am a right-handed crocheter. I hold my crochet hook with the thumb, index finger, and middle finger of my right hand. I hold my work-in-progress with both hands -- part in the left hand, and part using my pinkie and fourth finger and the palm of my right hand. I regulate...MORE the yarn and yarn tension using my left hand.


    Left-handed crocheters can reverse this.


    Please keep in mind that this is only ONE possible way of working -- and there are many possibilities! This works for me, but it might or might not work for you. If it doesn't work for you, no worries -- there is a way that will work for you! It's just a matter of you trying different things to see what's most comfortable for you.


    Continue to 3 of 7 below.
  • 03 of 07

    Holding a Crochet Hook With the Knife Grip

    The photo above shows me crocheting when holding my crochet hook using the knife grip. Please be aware that this is not the way I typically work.


    As you can see, I am a right-handed crocheter. When holding my work using the knife grip, I typically hold my crochet project in my left hand, and I also regulate the yarn and the yarn tension with my left hand.


    Left-handed crocheters can reverse this.


    For me, this works OK for small crochet projects, but not so well for larger crochet projects, where I...MORE prefer to hold the work-in-progress using both hands. When using the knife grip for traditional crochet projects, I haven't yet found a way of comfortably holding both my crochet hook and my work in my right hand -- because the crochet hook gets in my way.


    Again, please keep in mind that this is only ONE possible way of working -- and there are many possibilities! It works for many crocheters, and it might work for you too. If not, no worries -- there is a way that will work for you! It's just a matter of you trying different things to see what's most comfortable for you.


    Continue to 4 of 7 below.
  • 04 of 07

    How to Hold a Tunisian Crochet Hook

    A Tunisian crochet hook (otherwise known as an afghan hook, or an afghan crochet hook) is different than a traditional crochet hook; it's longer, and there isn't a thumb rest on a Tunisian hook.


    You don't want to use a pencil grip to hold a Tunisian crochet hook. Instead, use an overhand grip that allows you to manipulate both the hook and the work as you crochet.


    When I am working Tunisian crochet, my working hand -- the right hand -- forms a sort of loose, easy fist, with the crochet hook in...MORE motion inside. The crochet hook needs to be able to rotate and move freely inside the hand. I use the fingers and the hand for either manipulating the crochet hook or the work-in-progress (sometimes for scooting stitches further in one direction or the other on the hook).


    See Also:


    Continue to 5 of 7 below.
  • 05 of 07

    The Pencil Grip for Left-Handed Crocheters

    I usually use the pencil grip for holding my crochet hook. In the upper photo above, you can see a close-up view of this. In the lower photo above, you can see a zoomed-out view of me holding a crochet project.


    I am a right-handed crocheter, but I've reversed these photos to simulate how they would look if a left-handed crocheter were using the same exact method I use. So here's how it would look if I were to hold my crochet hook with the thumb, index finger, and middle finger of my left...MORE hand. I would hold my work-in-progress with both hands -- part in the right hand, and part using my pinkie and fourth finger and the palm of my left hand. I would regulate the yarn and yarn tension using my right hand.


    Please keep in mind that this is only ONE possible way of working -- and there are many possibilities! This works for me, but it might or might not work for you. If it doesn't work for you, no worries -- there is a way that will work for you! It's just a matter of you trying different things to see what's most comfortable for you.


    See Also:


    Continue to 6 of 7 below.
  • 06 of 07

    The Knife Grip for Left-Handed Crocheters

    Many left-handed crocheters prefer the knife grip, as I found out when I asked left-handed people to share the story of how they learned to crochet. The photo above is a simulation of one possible way that a left-handed person could hold a crochet hook; I'm a right-handed crocheter, so I reversed this photo to show you how it would look if I were using the same method with my left hand instead of my right.


    When holding the crochet work using the knife grip, a left-handed person could hold the...MORE crochet project in the right hand, and also regulate the yarn and the yarn tension with the right hand (as shown).


    When I do the right-handed version of this method, it works OK for small crochet projects, but not so well for larger crochet projects, where I prefer to hold the work-in-progress using both hands. When using the knife grip for traditional crochet projects, I haven't yet found a way of comfortably holding both my crochet hook and my work in my right hand -- because the crochet hook gets in my way. For whatever reason, this is not an issue for the left-handed crocheters I've communicated with -- so please don't let my inefficiency with this technique discourage you from trying it!


    Also, please keep in mind that this is only ONE possible way of working -- and there are many possibilities! If it doesn't work for you, no worries -- there is a way that will work for you! It's just a matter of you trying different things to see what's most comfortable for you.


    See Also:


    Continue to 7 of 7 below.
  • 07 of 07

    How to Hold a Tunisian Crochet Hook (Left-Handed)

    A Tunisian crochet hook (otherwise known as an afghan hook, or an afghan crochet hook) is different than a traditional crochet hook; it's longer, and there isn't a thumb rest on a Tunisian hook.


    You don't want to use a pencil grip to hold a Tunisian crochet hook. Instead, use an overhand grip that allows you to manipulate both the hook and the work as you crochet.


    I am right-handed, but I've reversed the photo above to show what it might look like if a left-handed person held the hook the same...MORE way I do. When I am working Tunisian crochet, my working hand -- in your case, it would be the left hand -- would form a sort of loose, easy fist, with the crochet hook in motion inside. The crochet hook needs to be able to rotate and move freely inside the hand, and you would use your fingers as well as the whole hand for either manipulating the crochet hook or the work-in-progress (sometimes for scooting stitches further in one direction or the other on the hook.)


    See Also: