How to Make Fondant Petals

  • 01 of 10

    Gather Your Ingredients

    Fondant Petals photo
    (c) 2011 Elizabeth LaBau, licensed to About.com, Inc.

    For easily printable instructions, please see this Fondant Petals page.

    Fondant Petals are beautiful lifelike edible rose petals made out of fondant. They can be made large and used to decorate cakes, cupcakes, and other pastries, or made miniature and used to decorate candies, as in these raspberry rose truffles. If you want to make your own fondant to make these petals, we recommend making basic fondant or marshmallow fondant.

    To make fondant petals, you will need

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  • 02 of 10

    Dilute the Food Coloring

    Fondant Petals photo
    (c) 2011 Elizabeth LaBau, licensed to About.com, Inc.

    Begin by mixing your food coloring with a little water to thin it out and dilute the color. The exact amount of water you use will depend on the color you're going for and the strength of your original food coloring. Start with a 50-50 ratio and add more water as necessary until you get a color you like.

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  • 03 of 10

    Roll the Fondant Out

    Fondant Petals photo
    (c) 2011 Elizabeth LaBau, licensed to About.com, Inc.

    Dust your work surface with powdered sugar or corn starch, and roll the fondant out until it is very thin.

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  • 04 of 10

    Make Sure the Fondant Is Thin Enough

    Fondant Petals photo
    (c) 2011 Elizabeth LaBau, licensed to About.com, Inc.

    You want the fondant to be less than 1/8-inch thick. For lifelike petals the fondant needs to be very thin, so the thinner you can get it during this initial stage, the better.

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  • 05 of 10

    Cut Circles out of the Fondant

    Fondant Petals photo
    (c) 2011 Elizabeth LaBau, licensed to About.com, Inc.

    Use a small circular cutter to cut circles out of the fondant. If you're making a lot of petals, don't cut them all at once, or the fondant will be too dry to work with by the time you get to the end. Instead, work with a portion of the fondant at one time and keep the rest covered with cling wrap until you're ready to use it.

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  • 06 of 10

    Thin the Edges of the Circles

    Fondant Petals photo
    (c) 2011 Elizabeth LaBau, licensed to About.com, Inc.

    Take a fondant circle and press it between your fingers, thinning out the edges. Rose petals are thin and delicate along the edges, so want to replicate this effect by thinning the edges of your fondant. If it's difficult to get it thin enough between your fingers, lay it on your work surface and press your fingers outward along the edges to thin it.

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  • 07 of 10

    Paint the Rose Petals

    Fondant Petals photo
    (c) 2011 Elizabeth LaBau, licensed to About.com, Inc.

    Take your diluted food coloring and paint your fondant petal. You can paint the whole thing, or just the edges, or just the interior—whatever looks right to you! Real rose petals have variations in color and intensity, so you can play around with coloring your petals and see what you like.

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  • 08 of 10

    Add Shimmer Dust

    Fondant Petals photo
    (c) 2011 Elizabeth LaBau, licensed to About.com, Inc.

    If you have petal dust, luster dust, or shimmer dust, you can play around with adding these in addition to or instead of the coloring. Be aware that many luster dust doesn't mix well with water and should either be applied to a dry surface or mixed with alcohol to make a liquid. Check your specific product for usage guidelines.

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  • 09 of 10

    Dry the Petals

    Fondant Petals photo
    (c) 2011 Elizabeth LaBau, licensed to About.com, Inc.

    To dry the petals, crumple up some foil, waxed paper, or parchment paper, and spread the petals across the surface, draping them unevenly over the crumpled material so they do not lie flat. This will give them interesting, lifelike shapes when they're dry. Allow them to sit out overnight to dry completely.

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  • 10 of 10

    Your Fondant Petals Are Now Finished!

    Fondant Petals photo
    (c) 2011 Elizabeth LaBau, licensed to About.com, Inc.

    Your fondant petals are now finished! They can be used to decorate the tops of cakes, cupcakes, or candies, as in the case of these raspberry rose truffles. They can be stored indefinitely in an airtight container at room temperature. Fondant does tend to absorb moisture, so don't refrigerate them or place them on a moist dessert until you are ready to serve it.

    Click Here to View All Fondant Recipes