Hungarian Chicken Paprikash Soup (Paprikas Csirkleves) Recipe

Hungarian Chicken Paprikash Soup with Bread Dumplings
Hungarian Chicken Paprikash Soup with Bread Dumplings. © Barbara Rolek licensed to About.com, Inc.
  • 50 mins
  • Prep: 10 mins,
  • Cook: 40 mins
  • Yield: 10 servings
Ratings (5)

This recipe for Hungarian chicken paprikash soup or paprikás csirkleves (PAH-pree-kahsh CHEERK-leh-vesh) is hearty enough to be eaten as a main course especially when served with nokedli, csipetke, dumplings that are similar to spaetzle, or with bread dumplings.

Boneless, skinless chicken breasts, a cut-up fryer or a whole soup chicken can be used in this dish modeled after the famous Hungarian chicken stew. This will feed a crowd so feel free to cut the recipe in half.

What You'll Need

  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon neutral oil (like canola or vegetable)
  • Salt to taste
  • 6 whole boneless, skinless chicken breasts (or 12 breast halves)
  • 1 large onion (chopped)
  • 4 ribs celery (chopped)
  • 46 ounces chicken broth
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 chicken bouillon cubes
  • 12 level tablespoons Chef Rick's Chicken Paprikash Soup and Sauce Seasoning
  • 16 ounces sour cream

How to Make It

  1. In a large soup pot or Dutch oven, melt butter and oil. Sauté whole chicken breasts that have been seasoned with salt until browned and cooked through. Remove from pan.
  2. Add onion and celery, and sauté until translucent. Add chicken broth, water and bouillon cubes. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer until vegetables are tender.
  3. Turn the heat off, take the pot off the stove and let cool 10 minutes. Add 12 tablespoons Chef Rick's Chicken Paprikash Soup and Sauce Seasoning and whisk until seasonings have dissolved and are blended. Add sour cream and again whisk until smooth.
  1. Dice cooked chicken into bite-size pieces and add to soup with cooked noodles of choice and mix with a spoon, heating over low heat until soup reaches 165 F on an instant-read thermometer.
  2. Serve with rye or hearty white bread and butter.

Hungarians Love Their Soup

Known as leves in Hungarian, soup is an important part of the cuisine. Sometimes it's served as the first course of an equally filling main course.

Sometimes it serves as lunch with hearty bread and butter. It even appears for breakfast on celebration days along with a full spread of other delights.

And farmers and other hard-working people often start the day with a bracing bowl of soup. Here are just a few examples of the many types of leves that exist:

  • Hungarian Sour Cherry Soup Recipe: The emphasis here is on sour cherries, not the sweet Bing variety. This cold soup can be eaten as an appetizer or dessert course.
  • Hungarian Chilled Summer Squash Soup Recipe: This is a chilled creamed soup perfect for the dog days of summer.
  • Hungarian Cream of Green Bean Soup RecipeThis soup can be eaten hot or cold and it makes fresh summer produce the shining star.
  • Hungarian Creamy Kohlrabi Soup RecipeThis soup is perfect for vegetarians but, because it contains dairy, would not be appropriate for vegans. For omnivores, it's a delightful light way to start a multicourse meal.
  • Hungarian Beef Goulash Soup Recipe: If beef isn't your cup of tea, you can substitute veal in this meaty soup bursting with veggies.
  • Hungarian Bean Soup RecipeThis hearty soup can be made with a meaty ham bone or smoked ham hock. For real flavor, use the defatted drippings from a baked ham.