How to Make Focaccia - An Illustrated Recipe

  • 01 of 09

    Making a Focaccia: Start with the Dough

    Making A Focaccia: Start With Bread Dough
    Making A Focaccia: Start With Bread Dough. © Kyle Phillips Licensed to About.Com

    Focaccia, or schiacciata, is an easy to make flat bread. I took these photos at the Nardi Family's villa in Montelupo Fiorentino, the day Francesco roasted the piglet for his sister Francesca's birthday, and since they were expecting about 25 people they made a lot.

    The dough pictured here is about 10 pounds, while the section Margherita (Francesca's Mom) is separating is about 2 pounds (1 k) and will be sufficient for a single large focaccia to be baked in a (roughly) 80 cm meter by...MORE 40 cm (32 by 16 inch or so) pan.

    Continue to 2 of 9 below.
  • 02 of 09

    Making Focaccia: Spread the Dough

    Making Focaccia: Spreading the Dough
    Making Focaccia: Spreading the Dough. © Kyle Phillips Licensed to About.Com
    Margherita's pan is larger than most home ovens (mine, at least) can handle.

    To make a focaccia on a baking sheet-sized pan you'll need:

    6 1/4 cups (750 g) unbleached all purpose flour
    A cake or package of active yeast
    About 1 1/2 cups (350 ml) warm water
    1/3 cup extravirgin olive oil
    Salt, both finely and coarsely ground (kosher will work well for the latter)

    Dissolve the yeast in the warm water. Make a mound of flour on your work surface, scoop a well into the middle of it, and pour in the...MORE yeast mixture together with 5 tablespoons of olive oil and 2 healthy pinches of fine salt.

    Knead the mixture, adding further warm water is necessary, until you obtain a fairly firm, homogeneous dough -- figure 10-15 minutes of kneading. Put the dough in a bowl, cover it with a damp cloth, and let it rise in a warm place for 2 hours.

    Oil your pan or baking sheet, and spread the dough over it -- pull the dough out with your hands, stretching it to fill the pan. Do not roll the dough, because the texture of the focaccia will suffer.
    Continue to 3 of 9 below.
  • 03 of 09

    Continue Spreading and Pulling the Dough

    Making Focaccia: Pull the Dough
    Making Focaccia: Pull the Dough. © Kyle Phillips Licensed to About.Com
    Continue spreading the dough, stretching and pulling it. When you are finished it should be a bit less than a half inch (1 cm) thick in the center, and a little thicker around the edges.
    Continue to 4 of 9 below.
  • 04 of 09

    Dimple the Dough

    Making Focaccia: Dimple Dough
    Making Focaccia: Dimple Dough. © Kyle Phillips Licensed to About.Com
    The top of a focaccia is always dimpled. Here Margherita is using a wooden spoon with wooden dowels set into it that make quick work of the dimpling. You could also use the back of a teaspoon, or your fingertips.
    Continue to 5 of 9 below.
  • 05 of 09

    The Dimpler, Close Up

    Making Focaccia: The Dimpler
    Making Focaccia: The Dimpler. © Kyle Phillips Licensed to About.Com
    The dimpler with which to dimple a focaccia. One can also use this tool to remove spaghetti from boiling water.

    After dimpling the focaccia, let it rise for 10-15 minutes in the pan -- you can use this time to prepare the toppings, if you are using them.
    Continue to 6 of 9 below.
  • 06 of 09

    Making Focaccia: Toppings

    Making Focaccia: Oil and Toppings
    Making Focaccia: Oil and Toppings. © Kyle Phillips Licensed to About.Com
    Focaccia always has something on it. The simplest topping is a sprinkling of olive oil and sale grosso, coarse grained sea salt (Kosher salt is quite similar to sale grosso), but you can do more. For example:

    Finely slice a few onions, separate the rings, and sprinkle them over the focaccia. Here Margherita has also added funghi sott'olio, mushrooms packed in oil.

    You could dot the focaccia with cubes of pancetta, and Margherita did with another focaccia that will be pictured shortly, adding...MORE onion rings as well.

    You could dot the focaccia with pitted black olives, or thinly sliced grilled bell peppers.

    If you want to be simple, rosemary needles, or crumbled walnuts (or both, but that's not so simple)

    Or add anything else that suits your fancy. The one thing I would be careful about topping a focaccia with is cheese, especially if you're using a hot oven, because if it overbrowns it will become bitter.

    When you have finished sprinkling toppings, drizzle some olive oil over the focaccia, and sale grosso (kosher salt) to taste.
    Continue to 7 of 9 below.
  • 07 of 09

    Baking the Focaccia

    Making Facaccia: In the Oven
    Making Facaccia: In the Oven. © Kyle Phillips Licensed to About.Com

    Francesco was still heating the oven to get it ready for the piglet when they began to bake, hence the abundance of flame. In terms of temperature the oven was probably about 550-600 F (close to 300 C -- there was still some soot on the walls, which burns off completely at about 700 F, or 350 C), and the baking time for the focaccia was about 10 minutes.

    If you are using a home oven, preheat it to 400 - 450 F (200 - 225 C) and bake the focaccia on a low rack until golden, about 20-25 minutes,...MORE turning the pan 180 degrees once partway through. Then remove it from the oven and let it cool. Don't let it overbrown or it will toughen.

    One option, if you are using a home oven, is to put a bowl of water in the oven with the focaccia. This will keep it from becoming hard.

    Continue to 8 of 9 below.
  • 08 of 09

    A Focaccia with Onions and Pancetta

    Focaccia with Onions and Pancetta
    Focaccia with Onions and Pancetta. © Kyle Phillips Licensed to About.Com
    This focaccia came out slightly more browned. The next step is to cut it into strips, and enjoy.
    Continue to 9 of 9 below.
  • 09 of 09

    Plain Focaccia, and Focaccia with Onions and Mushrooms

    Plain Focaccia, and Focaccia with Onions and Mushrooms
    Plain Focaccia, and Focaccia with Onions and Mushrooms. © Kyle Phillips Licensed to About.Com
    Here we have plain focaccia (perfect for those who don't like toppings, and also ideal for making sandwiches -- you open it horizontally and fill it with the cold cut you prefer), and focaccia with onions and mushrooms. Again, cut into strips and enjoy.