22 Indoor Vining Plants That'll Look Great in Your Home

Hanging pothos in a white room styled with boho and macrame hangers.

FollowTheFlow / Getty Images

When it comes to choosing the perfect plant for your home you can never go wrong with a vining plant. Vining plants come in all shapes, sizes, and temperaments—from the easy-going pothos to the finicky string of pearls—there is truly a plant for every type of space. Train your plant to grow up a trellis or moss pole, or display its gorgeous vines from a hanging basket. Either way, adding one of these 22 indoor plants to your home is a sure way to give any room an instant tropical feeling.

  • 01 of 22

    Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)

    Vining pothos (Epipremnum aureum) in a white pot against a grey wall.

    Brendan Maher / Getty Images

    Everyone’s favorite low-maintenance, low-light houseplant—the pothos (Epipremnum aureum)—cannot go unmentioned as one of the top vining plants for the home. Pothos plants grow quickly, require very little upkeep, and are not picky about their growing conditions. Prune to shape and control size as necessary.

    • Light: Low to bright indirect light
    • Water: Water when the soil is dry
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up to 12 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets
  • 02 of 22

    Heartleaf Philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum)

    A small heartleaf philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum) in a black pot against a white wall.

    Christian Steinsworth / Getty Images

    The heartleaf philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum) is one of the most common vining houseplants and for good reason. It is low-maintenance, fast-growing, and it looks great in nearly every space. It looks great in hanging baskets or placed on shelves or bookcases where its long vines can drape down.

    • Light: Low to bright indirect light
    • Water: Water when the soil is dry
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up to 10 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets
  • 03 of 22

    Brasil Philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum 'Brasil')

    Close up shot of a Brasil Philodendron's (Philodendron hederaceum 'Brasil') leaves against a white wall.

    Ali Majdfar / Getty Images

    A cultivator of the more common heartleaf philodendron, the Brasil Philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum ‘Brasil’) is characterized by stunning light to medium green variegation throughout the foliage. Its care is pretty much the same as the heartleaf philodendron, and it will do well in nearly any spot in the home. Note that the more light you give a Brasil Philodendron, the more vigorous the variegation will be, so avoid low-light locations when possible to get the most out of this gorgeous varietal.

    • Light: Medium to bright indirect light
    • Water: Water when the soil is dry
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up to 10 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets
  • 04 of 22

    Philodendron Micans

    A Philodendron micans with dark green velvety leaves sitting in a white shelving unit.

    SEE D JAN / Getty Images

    Philodendron micans is an uncommon vining philodendron that is characterized by gorgeous deep green to maroon velvety leaves. It is a fast-growing plant in the right conditions and is generally easy to take care of. While it can be trained to grow upwards using a trellis or moss pole, it is most frequently grown in hanging baskets as a trailing plant. Prune to shape if desired, otherwise let this tropical vine grow.

    • Light: Medium to bright indirect light
    • Water: Water once the soil is dry
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up to 5 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets
    Continue to 5 of 22 below.
  • 05 of 22

    Mini Monstera (Raphidophora tetrasperma)

    A mini monstera (Raphidophora tetrasperma) on a white stool in a black pot.

    Firn / Getty Images

    While this stunning little plant may look like a variety of Monstera (hence its common name), it is actually a Raphidora tetrasperma which is not in the Monstera genus. Its growth pattern and care, however, is similar, although as you might have guessed mini monsteras are much smaller than the typical Monstera deliciosa (perfect for smaller rooms or apartments!). Mini monsteras have a climbing growth habit and will grow upwards over time, usually requiring a stake or trellis once they get up to a couple of feet in height.

    • Light: Bright indirect light
    • Water: Water when the soil is dry
    • Mature Size: Up to 12 ft. tall
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets
  • 06 of 22

    Satin Pothos (Scindapsus pictus 'Exotica')

    A satin pothos (Scindapsus pictus 'Exotica') close up shot of the leaves.

    SEE D JAN / Getty Images

    While commonly referred to as the satin pothos, this vining plant is not actually a pothos at all but a variety of Scindapsus. Characterized by large, thick velvety leaves with iridescent splotches of silver, the satin pothos is hard to pass up. While it is a bit slower growing than some of the other plants on this list, its care requirements are simple and it will do well nearly anywhere in your house.

    • Light: Medium to bright indirect light
    • Water: Water once the soil is dry
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up to 10 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets
  • 07 of 22

    Scindapsus pictus 'Argyraeus'

    Scindapsus pictus 'Argyraeus' in a white hanging pot with a macrame hanger - shot from below.

    Eva Peters / Getty Images

    Another gorgeous variety of Scindapsus is the Scindapsus pictus 'Argyraeus' - a slightly smaller plant than the Scindapsus pictus 'Exotica' (satin pothos), but generally faster growing. It is also characterized by velvety green leaves with iridescent silver spots, although the leaves are usually more green than silver. It does best in bright to medium indirect light and does not require any ongoing pruning or vine maintenance. 

    • Light: Medium to bright indirect light
    • Water: Water when the soil is dry
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up to 5 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets
  • 08 of 22

    Scindapsus Treubii 'Moonlight'

    Scindapsus treubii 'Moonlight' in a terracotta pot on a wood coffee table.

    Tharakorn / Getty Images

    Scindapsus treubii 'Moonlight' is a slow-growing Scindapsus variety that is characterized by waxy green leaves with an iridescent silvery hue. Mature plants grow well in hanging planters or as climbers with a moss pole or trellis. While they can be hard to get your hands on, these unique plants make great additions to any household. 

    • Light: Bright indirect light
    • Water: Water when the soil is dry
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up to 4ft. long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets, toxic to humans
    Continue to 9 of 22 below.
  • 09 of 22

    Monstera deliciosa

    A vining Monstera Deliciosa with dark green fenestrated leaves in a white pot atop a light wood table.

    Kseniâ Solov'eva / EyeEn / Getty Images

    The Monstera deliciosa is a fantastic low-maintenance vining plant for any home. This Instagram-worthy plant has an upward vining growth habit and does best with a moss pole or trellis as it matures so its aerial roots have something to grab onto. The Monstera is a pretty forgiving plant, making it great for beginners and houseplant experts alike. 

    • Light: Medium to bright light is best, but it can survive in low light as well
    • Water: Water when the soil is dry
    • Mature Size: 10-15 ft. tall
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets, toxic to humans
  • 10 of 22

    Swiss Cheese Plant (Monstera adansonii)

    Swiss cheese plant (Monstera adansonii) in a terracotta pot against a white background.

    Kseniia Soloveva / Getty Images

    Also commonly known as the swiss cheese plant, the Monstera adansonii is a close runner-up to the Monstera deliciosa when it comes to popular Monstera varieties. These tropical plants are characterized by highly fenestrated bright green leaves (they look kind of like swiss cheese, right?), and a climbing growth habit. They don’t require regular pruning, but the occasional trimming may be necessary to keep their size manageable.

    • Light: Medium to bright indirect light
    • Water: Water when the soil is dry
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up to 12 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets, toxic to humans
  • 11 of 22

    Monstera Peru (Monstera karstenianum)

    Monstera Peru in a wood pot on top of a white stool with other plants in the background.

    Firn / Getty Images

    Monstera Peru (also known as Monstera karstenianum) is a rare variety of monstera that is characterized by stunning embossed leaves and a vining growth habit. While it may be harder to get your hands on, Monstera Peru is actually a pretty easy plant to care for and grows quickly under the right conditions. Place it in a focal spot of your home and admire those stunning leaves all day long.

    • Light: Medium to bright indirect light
    • Water: Water when the soil is dry
    • Mature Size: Up to 10 ft. tall
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets, toxic to humans
  • 12 of 22

    String of Pearls (Senecio rowleyanus)

    Two pots of string of pearls (Senecio rowleyanus) shot from above against a white background.

    The Spruce / Kara Riley

    Notorious for being tricky to keep happy indoors, the string of pearls (Senecio rowleyanus) is another great vining plant for those willing to give it a try. These succulents require lots of bright, direct sunlight for several hours a day, and should only be watered once every couple of weeks. Overwatering is the most common cause of death for string of pearls houseplants—they are extremely drought tolerant.

    • Light: Several hours of bright, direct sunlight a day
    • Water: Water once every few weeks once the pearls have a ‘puckered’ appearance
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up 2-3 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets, toxic to humans
    Continue to 13 of 22 below.
  • 13 of 22

    String of Hearts (Ceropegia woodii)

    String of hearts (Ceropegia woodii) in a white pot with star cutouts on top of a white shelf.

    Lana_M / Getty Images

    The string of hearts (Ceropegia woodii) is a semi-succulent plant that is beloved for its delicate vines and small, heart-shaped leaves. This adorable plant is easy to grow and looks great in hanging planters due to its long, fast-growing vines. It prefers locations that receive bright, indirect light throughout the day and only needs to be watered once the soil dries out completely.

    • Light: Bright, indirect light
    • Water: Allow the soil to dry out between waterings
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up to 12 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Non-toxic
  • 14 of 22

    String of Dolphins (Senecio peregrinus)

    String of dolphins (Senecio peregrinus) in a white pot on top of a wooden table next to a window.

    The Spruce / Krystal Slagle

    A close relative of the string of pearls, the string of dolphins (Senecio peregrinus) is an adorable vining succulent that is hard to pass up. True to its name, its leaves resemble a pod of jumping dolphins. Like most succulents, the string of dolphins needs lots of bright, direct sunlight in order to survive indoors. If you notice the leaves start to flatten and don’t resemble dolphins anymore—that’s a sign that your plant is not getting enough light.

    • Light: Several hours of bright, direct sunlight a day
    • Water: Water once every few weeks
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow between 1 to 2 feet long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets, toxic to human
  • 15 of 22

    String of Bananas (Senecio radicans)

    String of bananas (Senecio radicans) in a white pot on top of a mirrored tray.

    The Spruce / Krystal Slagle

    Another close relative of the string of pearls, the string of bananas (Senecio radicans) is known for being faster growing and easier to care for than its popular counterpart. For optimal growth, ensure that this succulent gets at least four to five hours of bright, direct sunlight each day, and allow the soil to dry out thoroughly between waterings.

    • Light: At least 4-5 hours of bright, direct sunlight a day
    • Water: Allow the soil to dry out thoroughly between waterings
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up to 3 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets, toxic to humans
  • 16 of 22

    String of Turtles (Peperomia prostrata)

    String of turtles (Peperomia prostrata) in a yellow pot sitting on top of a stack of books.

    The Spruce / Krystal Slagle

    The string of turtles (Peperomia prostrata) is a great choice for those that are looking for a small vining plant to add to their collection. This delicate peperomia is characterized by small, succulent-like leaves that are adorned with intricate patterns that resemble tiny turtle shells. Like most peperomia, the string of turtles does well in a range of lighting conditions and is generally low-maintenance (plus it’s safe for your furry friends!).

    • Light: Low to bright indirect light
    • Water: Water once the top inch of soil is dry
    • Mature Size: Stems can grow up to 2 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Non-toxic
    Continue to 17 of 22 below.
  • 17 of 22

    Hoya Carnosa

    A luscious Hoya carnosa plant in an orange pot on top of a wooden stool.

    Andrey Nikitin / Getty Images

    The Hoya carnosa is one of the most common and popular types of hoya plants grown indoors. Its long vines and thick, waxy leaves make it an attractive addition to any space, and in the right conditions, it is pretty low-maintenance. One thing to note is that this hoya enjoys being slightly rootbound, so don’t be afraid to leave it in its pot for a couple of years at a time.

    • Light: Bright direct to indirect light
    • Water: Allow the soil to dry out thoroughly between waterings
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow between 3-4 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Non-toxic
  • 18 of 22

    Hoya Compacta (Hoya carnosa 'Compacta')

    Hoya compacta (Hoya carnosa compacta) in a white pot with gold watering can in the background.

    The Spruce / Cori Sears

    A cultivator of the Hoya carnosa, the hoya compacta (Hoya carnosa compacta) is characterized by twisted, waxy leaves that resemble thick ropes. It’s care is pretty similar to the standard Hoya carnosa - it enjoys a well-draining soil mix; lots of bright, direct sunlight; and infrequent watering. The compacta cultivator does grow a little bit more slowly than the Hoya carnosa, but its unique foliage makes it worth the extra wait!

    • Light: Bright direct to indirect light
    • Water: Allow the soil to dry out thoroughly between waterings
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up to 15 in. long
    • Toxicity: Non-toxic
  • 19 of 22

    Arrowhead Plant (Syngonium podophyllum)

    Arrowhead plant (Syngonium podophyllum) in a grey pot.

    Firn / Getty Images

    The arrowhead plant (Syngonium podophyllum) is a low-light-tolerant houseplant that has a number of interesting varieties to choose from. Young plants start out in a compact form, but over time arrowhead plants begin to vine and are best displayed in hanging planters or as climbers using a trellis or moss pole.

    • Light: Low to bright indirect light
    • Water: Water once the top couple inches of soil are dry
    • Mature Size: Vines can 3-6 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets, toxic to humans
  • 20 of 22

    Spiderwort (Tradescantia)

    Spiderwort (Tradescantia) with dark purple leaves in a qhite pot on top of a white fireplace.

    The Spruce / Krystal Slagle

    If you are looking for a trailing plant that will bring a pop of color into your space, a spiderwort plant (Tradescantia) may just be the choice for you. These compact vining plants come in dazzling purples and greens that are sure to liven up any room. They prefer warm, humid conditions and lots of light, so be sure to keep this plant out of any particularly dry areas of your home and give it a nice bright spot.

    • Light: Bright indirect light
    • Water: Water once the top inch of soil is dry.
    • Mature Size: 6-12 in. tall, 12-24 in. wide
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets, toxic to humans
    Continue to 21 of 22 below.
  • 21 of 22

    String of Nickels (Dischidia nummularia)

    Three string of nickels (Dischidia nummularia) plants in hanging pots in front of a large window.

    pojcheewin / Getty Images

    The string of nickels (Dischidia nummularia) is a small vining plant that is characterized by bright green fleshy, oval leaves. In the wild, the string of nickels is often found climbing tree trunks and branches. Because these plants are epiphytic, it is important that they are planted in a well-draining, airy potting mix so that the roots have space to breathe. 

    • Light: Bright indirect light
    • Water: Water when the top couple inches of soil are dry
    • Mature Size: Vines grow between 12-18 in. long
    • Toxicity: Non-toxic
  • 22 of 22

    English Ivy (Hedera helix)

    Close up overhead shot of an English ivy plant (Hedera helix) with bright green leaves in a white pot.

    The Spruce / Phoebe Cheong

    English ivy (Hedera helix) is a vigorous vining plant that is a great choice for those looking for a luscious, fast-growing plant. Regular pruning will likely be necessary if you are growing English ivy indoors as these vining plants are fast growers in ideal conditions and can quickly outgrow a space.

    • Light: Bright, indirect light
    • Water: Water once the top inch of soil is dry
    • Mature Size: Vines can grow up to 100 ft. long
    • Toxicity: Toxic to pets, toxic to humans
Article Sources
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