Interwoven Squares Contemporary Quilt Pattern

  • 01 of 06

    Make a Gorgeous Interwoven Squares Quilt

    Interwoven Squares Quilt Pattern
    Interwoven Squares Quilt Pattern. Barb Horte

    Make a Scrap Quilt with the Interwoven Squares Quilt Pattern


    Interwoven Squares is an asymmetrical quilt that is not constructed with typical quilt blocks. A patchwork border surrounds the quilt in the larger image, but the pattern includes instructions for a quilt with plain borders (upper left).


    A big Thank You to Barb Horte, who designed the quilt and allowed me to write this version of the quilt pattern.



    Quilt Size


    • 78" x 57" without borders

    • 90" x 69" with plain borders

    Choose Fabrics for the Center of the Quilt


    Scrap quilt patterns make it difficult to predict actual yardage calculations. Pull from your scrap bin if possible. If you do not have a scrap bin, consider purchasing fat quarters or fat eighths of fabrics you love.


    The quilt designer suggests that you use a variety of fabrics to mimic the look of the sample quilt.


    • Choose fabrics of different shades and tones, vary the size or print, and use prints that include other colors.
    • Use at least 12 different fabrics for the background -- more is fine.
    • Cutting instructions are on page 2 and include yardages for quilters who do not want to make a scrap quilt. Yardages give you a good feel for the number of scraps needed.

    Other Fabrics and Materials


    Inner Border



    Outer Border


    • Made from 4-1/2" wide crosswise grain strips cut from selvage to selvage
    • 1-1/4 yards

    Quilt Backing and Batting


    • About 100" x 79" of each -- amount depends on the type of quilting planned.
    • If sending the project out for quilting, pay attention to the quilter's guidelines.
    • Quilt backing can be made from about 6 yards of typical quilting fabric.
    • How to Make Quilt Backing

    Quilt Binding



    Optional Patchwork Border


    If you do wish to make a similar patchwork border, construct 86 square in a square quilt blocks that finish at 3" x 3". 


    • Cut (86) 3-1/2" black squares (1-1/4 yards) for centers  
    • (344) 2" squares (1 yard) for triangles.
    • See my square in a square quilt block instructions at the top of a log cabin quilt block page.
    • There are other ways to create the patchwork border.

    Make the Patchwork Border Float


    Take a close look at the quilt with a patchwork border. To create a similar appearance, which makes the red areas of blocks appear to 'float' against the black, sew a narrow black border to the quilt first, before adding the patchwork, and a second narrow border to the quilt after adding the patchwork border.


    If you try that method, use 2" strips for the inner border and increase the number of square-in-a-square blocks to 90 to compensate for the additional width and length.


    Continue to 2 of 6 below.
  • 02 of 06

    Cutting for (Most of) the Quilt's Center

    Interwoven Squares Quilt Center
    Interwoven Squares Quilt Center. Barb Horte

    Abbreviations Used in the Pattern


    • HST -- Half Square Triangle Unit
    • QST -- Quarter Square Triangle Unit
    • BG -- Background

    About Quick-Pieced HST Units


    The square dimensions for HST units (below) are the 'textbook' size required to sew the units.


    I nearly always cut larger squares, upping the cuts by 1/8" to 1/4" and then trimming units back to the exact size after assembly to be sure they are correct before a quilt is assembled. See my HST trim back instructions to learn the correct trim-back method.


    Yard...MOREages are for all areas of the quilt except borders. You'll cut fabrics for QST units on page 4.


    Background (BG)


    • 206 squares cut 3-1/2" x 3-1/2“
    • 73 squares cut 3-7/8” x 3-7/8" for HSTs (draw a line from one corner to the opposite corner on the reverse side of each)
    • 2-1/2 yards if not making a scrap quilt.

    Dark blue (A)


    • 17 squares cut 3-7/8” x 3-7/8" for HSTs
    • 1/2 yard if not making a scrap quilt.

    Dark brown (B)


    • 19 squares cut 3-7/8” x 3-7/8" for HSTs
    • 1/2 yard if not making a scrap quilt.

    Dark purple (C)


    •  27 squares cut 3-7/8” x 3-7/8" HSTs
    • 1/2 yard if not making a scrap quilt.

    Dark orange (D)


    • 10 squares cut 3-7/8” x 3-7/8" for HSTs
    • 1/2 yard if not making a scrap quilt.

    Light blue (E)


    • 21 squares cut 3-1/2" x 3-1/2“
    • 3/8 yard if not making a scrap quilt.

    Light brown (G)


    • 28 squares cut 3-1/2" x 3-1/2“
    • 5/16 yard if not making a scrap quilt.

    Light purple (H)


    • 30 squares cut 3-1/2" x 3-1/2“
    • 5/16 yard if not making a scrap quilt.

    Light orange (J)


    • 17 squares cut 3-1/2" x 3-1/2“
    • 5/16 yard if not making a scrap quilt.

    Please note that there's no 'F' fabric. I did not want to change the designer's fabric designations so left them as is. It's easy to confuse F with E, so leaving one of those letters out is a good idea.


    Continue to 3 of 6 below.
  • 03 of 06

    Make Half Square Triangle Units for the Interwoven Squares Quilt

    Make Half Square Triangle Units
    Make Half Square Triangle Units. Barb Horte

    Make the HST Units


    1. You should have (73) 3-7/8" x 3-7/8" background squares and a total of 73 dark squares of the same size.
    2. Pair one of your dark 3-7/8" squares with a background square and sew the two together as explained in my HST tutorial. Use two seams that are each 1/4" from the marked diagonal line. Mark the lines if you do not have a 1/4" pressure foot. Sew with a scant (slightly narrower) quarter inch seam allowance if you are not using oversized squares as explained...MORE on the previous page.
    3. Press to set the seam and then cut apart on the marked diagonal line. Press each seam allowance towards the darker triangle and remove the little triangles (called dog ears) at each end of the seam.
    4. You should have two HST units that measure 3-1/2" x 3-1/2". Now's the time to trim back if you used oversize squares.
    5. Once you're familiar with the process, speed up assembly with chain piecing by feeding all units through the sewing machine one after the other to sew the first seam of each, without breaking threads.
    6. Clip threads and chain piece all units again to sew the second seam.
    7. Cut and press as before.
    8. Keep all like colors in separate piles.
    9. You should have a total of 146 half square triangle units that measure 3-1/2" x 3-1/2".

    Groups of HST Units


    • Fabric A -- dark blue and BG, 34
    • Fabric B -- dark brown and BG, 38
    • Fabric C -- dark purple and BG, 54
    • Fabric D -- dark orange and BG, 20

    Continue to 4 of 6 below.
  • 04 of 06

    Make HST Units and Divide in Half Diagonally

    Quarter Square Triangle Chart
    Quarter Square Triangle Chart. Janet Wickell

    Sew Four Types of HST Units and Cut Apart


    The remaining patchwork is made up mostly of (half) QST units that are sewn by quick piecing (larger) HST units and then cutting each unit in half diagonally across its seam line.


    • The QST units are sewn to larger triangles in the configurations shown on page 5.
    • A few more HST units are required, too.
    • The remaining units (both types) are used at layout intersections and turns.

    Label all units as you work. Have little slips of paper and plenty of straight pins...MORE handy unless you're sure sticky notes will stay put.


    You can use slightly larger squares to make the 'parent' HST units (left in each diagram) but trim them back to measure exactly 3-7/8" square before slicing in half. 


    Test a few units before cutting all of your fabric. Adjust the seam width if necessary.


    Make the QST Unit Parent Blocks and Slice Apart


    Background and Dark Blue Units


    1. Top drawing. Cut (3) 4-1/4" x 4-1/4" BG squares and three A (dark blue) squares of the same size.
    2. Use contrasting pairs to create six HST units that measure 3-7/8" x 3-7/8" each. If you sewed with oversized squares trim them back to that dimension.
    3. Cut each unit in half once diagonally, across the seam line, to create mirror image pairs as shown -- (6) each of A/BG1 and A/B2.

    Background and Dark Brown Units


    1. Second drawing from the top. Cut (5) 4-1/4" x 4-1/4" Background squares and five B (brown squares of the same size.
    2. Make 10 HST units from the pairs, each measuring 3-7/8" x 3-7/8".
    3. Cut each parent in half once diagonally to produce 10 mirror image segments -- five B/BG-1 and five B/BG-2.

    Background and Dark Purple Units


    1. Third drawing from the top. Cut (4) 4-1/4" x 4-1/4" Background squares and four C (purple) squares of the same size.
    2. Pair contrasting squares to create 8 HST units that measure 3-7/8" x 3-7/8". Divide diagonally as before and stack like units together.

    Background and Dark Orange Units


    1. Bottom drawing. Cut (6) 4-1/4" x 4-1/4" Background squares and four D (dark orange) squares of the same size.
    2. Pair contrasting squares. Make six HST units that measure 3-7/8" x 3-7/8". Cut each in half as before to create 12 of each mirror image unit.

    Make a Few More HST Units


    1. Cut (2) 3-7/8" x 3-7/8" C (purple) squares and the same number and size of E (light blue) squares.
    2. Pair contrasting squares to make four HST units that measure 3-1/2" x 3-1/2". You can mark these units #3, #4, #35, and #36.
    3. Cut (1) 3-7/8" x 3-7/8" C (purple) square and one G (light brown) square of the same size. Turn the pair into two HST units that measure 3-1/2" x 3-1/2". Mark the squares #27 and #29.
    4. Cut (1) 3-7/8" x 3-7/8" A (dark blue) square and a G (light brown) square of the same size. Turn the pair into two HST units that measure 3-1/2" x 3-1/2". Mark the squares #32 and #41.
    5. Cut (1) 3-7/8" x 3-7/8" J (light orange) square and a B (dark blue) square of the same size. Turn the pair into two HST units that measure 3-1/2" x 3-1/2". Mark the squares #33 and #34.

    Continue to 5 of 6 below.
  • 05 of 06

    Make HST and QST Units for Quilt Bends and Intersections

    Interwoven Squares Quilt Patchwork
    Sew More Patchwork for Interwoven Squares. Barb Horte

    Make the Intersecting Units for the Quilt


    Take care to compare each unit to the illustration because it's easy to get them backwards. 


    Remember to continue marking all of your triangles and finished units so that they correspond with the numbers on the diagram. Use a table or other flat surface to keep the units in numerical order.


    Take your time with this step. The units are not difficult, but a marathon sewing session could overwhelm a new quilter.


    Finish the QST Components


    Cut all squares below...MORE 3-7/8" x 3-7/8"  and then divide in half once diagonally. Mark with their color code.


    • (3) BG Squares (produce six triangles)
    • (3) A (dark blue) Squares (produce six triangles)
    • (8) B (dark brown) Squares (produce 16 triangles)
    • (5) C (dark orange) squares (produce 10 triangles)

    Make Remaining Portion of Units 1 Through 48


    It's easy to sew these together by matching components with the chart, but I've listed the combos below. A large triangle cut from a 3-7/8" square is sewn to each QST half from page 4.


    Arrange these in groups before you sew. Check and then check again for accuracy.


    • #1. a BG triangle to an A/BG-2 unit.
    • #2. a BG triangle to an A/BG-1 unit.
    • #3 and #4 Complete.
    • #5. an A triangle to a B/BG-2 unit.
    • #6. a BG triangle to a B/BG-1 unit.
    • #7. an A triangle to a B/BG-2 unit.
    • #8. a B triangle to a B/BG-2 unit.
    • #9. an A triangle to a B/BG-1 unit.
    • #10. a B triangle to a D-BG-1 unit.
    • #11. a B triangle to a D/BG-2 unit.
    • #12. a B triangle to a D/BG-1 unit.
    • #13. a B triangle to a C/BG-2 unit.
    • #14. a B triangle to a C/BG-1 unit.
    • #15. a B triangle to a C/BG-2 unit.
    • #16. a B triangle to a C/BG-1 unit.
    • #17. a BG triangle to a D/BG-1 unit.
    • #18. an A triangle to a B/BG-2 unit.
    • #19. a D triangle to an A/BG-1 unit.
    • #20. a D triangle to an A/BG-2 unit.
    • #21. a D triangle to an A/BG-2 unit.
    • #22. a D triangle to an A/BG-2 unit.
    • #23. a D triangle to a D/DBG-2 unit
    • #24. a B triangle to a D/BG-2 unit.
    • #25. a D triangle to a C/BG-2 unit.
    • #26. a D triangle to a C/BG-2 unit.
    • #27. Complete.
    • #28. a D triangle to a C/BG-2 unit.
    • #29. Complete.
    • #30. a BG triangle to a B/BG-1 unit.
    • #31. a B triangle to a B/BG-2 unit.
    • #32 through #38, complete.
    • #39. a B triangle to a D/BG-1 unit.
    • #40. a B triangle to a B/BG-2 unit.
    • #41. Complete.
    • #42. a B triangle to a B/BG-1 unit.
    • #43. a BG triangle to a B/BG-2 unit.
    • #44. a B triangle to a D/BG-2 unit.
    • #45. a B triangle to a D/BG-1 unit.
    • #46. a B triangle to a D/BG-2 unit
    • #47. a D triangle to a D/BG-1 unit.
    • #48. a BG triangle to a D/BG-1 unit.

    You will have a few leftover units.


    Continue to 6 of 6 below.
  • 06 of 06

    Finish Sewing the Interwoven Squares Quilt

    Interwoven Quilt Assembly Diagram
    Interwoven Quilt Assembly Diagram. Barb Horte

    Assemble the Interwoven Squares Quilt


    This quilt could be assembled by joining its patchwork into long, narrow rows and then joining the rows. But that method often leads to stretch and can produce a quilt top that's skewed out of shape.


    It's better to assemble the quilt in rectangular sections, and then join the sections to create the rows.


    A Few Tips from the Designer:


    • Mix the BG squares to avoid getting identical squares in the same positions, or next to each other in 'rows.'
    • Don’t try to...MORE control the placement of light squares. If a couple of like-squares end up side by side, don't worry about it.

    Create Rectangular Sections and Keep Track of Their Positions


    The solid black lines divide the quilt top into rectangular sections.


    The diagram is visible above and I've also included a larger view of the designer's drawing in a downloadable PDF file.


    Start with the top left section (five squares by four) and then continue on to other sections. Arrange plain and patchwork squares on a design wall or other flat surface as you work. Mark the sections in any way that helps you remember placement if you can't leave your work out until the quilt is finished.


    • Each of the top four sections has five units across and four down.
    • The bottom section has five units across and two down.
    • Numbers on the schematic reveal the location of units with QSTs. Double-check positions before you sew.
    • Light squares are flanked by darker half square triangles (each with a Background and a darker version of the light square it flanks). Placement for these units is very intuitive.

    When all sections are complete, join a group of sections (either across or down) to create rows (or columns). Finally, join the rows (or columns) to complete the quilt top.


    Press the quilt top.


    Add the Plain Borders


    Be sure to read How to Sew Straight Borders to Quilts if you are a beginner. The tutorial explains how to measure for borders and align the strips correctly -- a chance to square up a skewed quilt top.


    • Use 2-1/2" wide strips to sew all four inner borders.
    • Use 4-1/2" wide strips to sew all four outer borders.

    Finish the Quilt


    1. Press the quilt top again (carefully).
    2. Mark for quilting if necessary.
    3. Make a quilt sandwich with the quilt top, batting, and backing.
    4. Baste the layers, using a method appropriate for the type of quilting planned. Machine quilters often baste with safety pins. Thread is a traditional choice for hand quilting.
    5. Quilt the quilt.
    6. Remove excess batting and backing, squaring up the sides and corners of the quilt very carefully if necessary.
    7. Surround the quilt with easy mitered doublefold quilt binding.

    You can add a hanging sleeve either during or after assembly.