Maple Cream Candy Recipe

maple candy
David Muir/Photographer's Choice/Getty Images

Who would ever suspect that delicious maple cream candy is just pure maple syrup cooked down to a more solid form? That's right. This candy is made with only one ingredient. Learn how to make maple cream candy at home in about 75 minutes. And, if you're really ambitious, start with homemade maple syrup but, rest assured, purchased, good-quality syrup will work just fine in this recipe.

Difficulty: Easy

Time Required: 75 minutes

What You Will Need:

Here's How to make Maple Cream Candy

  1. Boil 2 cups of pure maple syrup over very low heat without stirring.
  2. Let it reach late thread stage, 233 degrees F. on a candy thermometer.
  3. Allow to cool to 110 degrees F. on a candy thermometer, about 1 hour, without stirring.
  4. Add 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract.
  5. Beat until it until it is light in color and fluffy in texture; hard enough to hold its shape.
  6. Put into forms or molds or shape into patties.

Maple Cream Candy-Making Tips

  • Use pure maple syrup, not imitation or maple-flavored.
  • Use a candy thermometer to reach exact temperatures.
  • This candy will dry out quickly when exposed to air. Pack in an airtight container as soon as it is cool.

The Art of Making Maple Syrup

The art of maple-syrup making or sugaring hasn't changed since Native Indians taught settlers how to do it.

Every year from February to April, when the sap runs, sugarmakers tap maple trees, insert a spout and collect the runoff in buckets to be boiled down into syrup, jelly, sugar and candy. 

If you have older maple trees on your property, you can attempt to make your own maple syrup. From tapping the trees, to collecting the sap, to boiling it down into syrup, or making candy as in this recipe, it would be a fun project to get the kids or grandkids involved in.

The whole process would take several weeks, so there is no instant gratification here. But it would keep a sustained interest for children and adults alike, similar to watching vegetables grow in a garden.