Marine Shrimp Photo Gallery

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    Mantis Shrimp

    Peacock Mantis Shrimp
    Peacock Mantis Shrimp. Dr. Roy Caldwell

     

    The Mantis Shrimp is a beautiful animal, but care should be taken when adding one to your aquarium. There are two hunting categories of Mantis Shrimps: the "spearers" and the "smashers". The "spearers" use their spear-like claw to silently stab soft tissued prey. The "smashers" use their forceful, club-like claw to hit, crack open or pulverize harder bodied prey.

    Dr. Roy Caldwell provides More Information About Mantis Shrimps.

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    Harlequin Shrimp (Hymenocera picta or elegans)

    Harlequin Shrimp (Hymenocera picta or elegans)
    Harlequin Shrimp (Hymenocera picta or elegans). Debbie Hauter

    This snap-shot of a Harlequin Shrimp (Hymenocera picta or elegans) taken by your Guides Debbie and Stan during a visit to the Maui Ocean Center in Hawaii. This little crustacean is also known as a Clown, Painted, or Dancing Shrimp.

    This is a very shy, mild tempered shrimp, as well as delicate and sensitive. It prefers hard rocky or coral substrates, rich with lots of hiding places. During daylight hours it keeps hidden and only goes out to feed at twilight hours, or complete darkness. It is...MORE almost always found in pairs with the female being the larger of the two.

    See More Information About the Harlequin Shrimp.

     

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  • 03 of 37

    Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius)

    Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius)
    Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius). Marge Umsted

    The Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius) may seriously damage soft corals and small-polyped stony corals. This shrimp is normally nocturnal in nature, but may be seen during the day in a low light aquarium.

     

     

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    Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius)

    Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius)
    Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius). Jason Cho

    This shrimp has a blood red or scarlet body with a few white speckles on the anterior end. The legs and antennae are a stark white.

     

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  • 05 of 37

    Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius)

    Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius)
    Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius). Joe Martin

    The Blood Red Fire Shrimp, also known as Blood Shrimp, Fire Shrimp, or Scarlet Cleaner Shrimp, is one of the most popular shrimp in the aquarium hobby.

     

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  • 06 of 37

    Blood Shrimp

    Blood Shrimp
    Blood Shrimp. Phil Harris

    The Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius) prefers a habitat providing it with a cave or overhang where the lighting is not too intense. While it will tolerate its mate, others of its own kind will be chased away or harassed. It is generally peaceful with most other organisms in the reef system unless they impinge on its territory.

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  • 07 of 37

    Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius)

    Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius)
    Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius). Tonilynn Gilham

    The Blood Shrimp (Lysmata debelius, as a "cleaner shrimp," will set up cleaning stations and remove dead tissue and parasites from fish that present themselves. It will also scavenge for meaty bits along the substrate bottom.
     

     

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  • 08 of 37

    Peppermint Shrimp (Lysmata wurdemanni)

    Peppermint Shrimp (Lysmata wurdemanni)
    Peppermint Shrimp (Lysmata wurdemanni). Jonathan Dillman

     Peppermint Shrimp (Lysmata wurdemanni) are nocturnal and very shy during the day, protecting themselves from predators by staying out of sight most of the time. However, at night when the big boys are napping, this shrimp forages the system looking for a meal.

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  • 09 of 37

    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)

    Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)
    Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis). Alex Chen

    The Pacific Cleaner Shrimp, true to its name, will clean parasites and debris from marine fish. It will even clean parasites from the mouth and gills of compliant fish. Contrary to popular belief, its red and white stripes do not totally protect it from predation by larger fish and eels.

     

     

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  • 10 of 37

    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)

    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)
    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis). Debbie & Stan Hauter

    This photo of a Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis) taken by your Guides Debbie and Stan during a visit to the Maui Ocean Center in Hawaii.

     

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  • 11 of 37

    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)

    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)
    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis). Dena Zingelewicz

    The Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis) is also known as the Scarlet Skunk Cleaner Shrimp and the Red Skunk Cleaner Shrimp.


     

     

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  • 12 of 37

    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)

    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)
    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis). Adrian Wood

    The Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis) is often found in groups among live rock or coral. In the home aquarium, the Scarlet Skunk Cleaner Shrimp requires similar habitats and peaceful tankmates. Some fish, such as Hawkfish and Lionfish or predatory shrimp or crabs may see this member of the Hippolytidae family as food.

     

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  • 13 of 37

    Pacific Cleaner Shrimps

    Cleaner Shrimps
    Cleaner Shrimps. Earl Coleman

     Like other invertebrates, the Pacific Cleaner Shrimp is intolerant of copper-based medications, high nitrate levels, and fluctuating water parameters. It also requires the drip-acclimation process when first introduced to your system.

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  • 14 of 37

    Pederson Cleaner Shrimp (Periclimenes pedersoni)

    Pederson Cleaner Shrimp (Periclimenes pedersoni)
    Pederson Cleaner Shrimp (Periclimenes pedersoni). Sabine Muulder

    The Pederson Cleaner Shrimp (Periclimenes pedersoni) is also known as the Caribbean Anemone Shrimp is endemic to strictly the Western part of the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean oceans.

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  • 15 of 37

    Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)

    Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)
    Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis). Keoki Stender

    Many believe that this shrimp is safe with eels, however it has been shown that at least the Snowflake Eel will eat this shrimp when it becomes tired of the shrimp constantly picking at it.

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    Coral Banded Shrimp (Stenopus hispidus)

    Coral Banded Shrimp (Stenopus hispidus)
    Coral Banded Shrimp (Stenopus hispidus). Keoki Stender

    A Coral Banded Shrimp (Stenopus hispidus)as it emerges from a crevice in the reef. These shrimp are common as pairs under rocks and ledges, remove parasites from fishes and attain a body length of about 3 inches.

     

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  • 17 of 37

    Coral Banded Shrimp (Stenopus hispidus)

    Coral Banded Shrimp
    Coral Banded Shrimp. George Schwaite

    Stenopus hispidus gets along well with most fish and invertebrates in an aquarium. However, triggerfish and many eels will dine on Coral Banded Shrimp when given the opportunity. This shrimp will actively clean fish, when presented with parasites.

     

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    Cauliflower Coral Shrimp (Alpheus lottini)

    Cauliflower Coral Shrimp (Alpheus lottini)
    Cauliflower Coral Shrimp (Alpheus lottini). Keoki Stender

    The Cauliflower Coral Shrimp (Alpheus lottini) which lives among branches of Cauliflower Corals. 

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    Wire Coral Shrimp (Pontonides unciger)

    Wire Coral Shrimp (Pontonides unciger)
    Wire Coral Shrimp (Pontonides unciger). Keoki Stender

     A photo of a number of Wire Coral Shrimp (Pontonides unciger) which is uncommonly found on and difficult to spot among the Wire Coral's tentacles. The Wire Coral Shrimp is normally less than 1cm in length.

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    Ghost Shrimp (Stenopus pyrsonotus)

    Ghost Shrimp (Stenopus pyrsonotus)
    Ghost Shrimp (Stenopus pyrsonotus). Keoki Stender

    A  photo of the Ghost Shrimp (Stenopus pyrsonotus) which is rare under ledges in deeper water, removes parasites from fishes and attains a body length about 4 inches.

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    Goby Shrimp (Alpheus rapax)

    Goby Shrimp (Alpheus rapax)
    Goby Shrimp (Alpheus rapax). Keoki Stender

    The Goby Shrimp (Alpheus rapax) which inhabits burrows with the Goby [i](Psilogobius mainlandi). This shrimp is Endemic to Hawaii and is common in shallow silty areas.

     

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    Peacock Mantis Shrimp (Odontodactylus scyllarus)

    Peacock Mantis Shrimp (Odontodactylus scyllarus)
    Peacock Mantis Shrimp (Odontodactylus scyllarus). Max Demaio

    The Mantis Shrimp is a beautiful animal, but care should be taken when adding one to your aquarium. There are two hunting categories of Mantis Shrimps: the "spearers" and the "smashers". The "spearers" use their spear-like claw to silently stab soft tissued prey. The "smashers" use their forceful, club-like claw to hit, crack open or pulverize harder bodied prey.

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    Reticulated Hinge-Beak Shrimp (Cinetorhynchus reticulatus)

    Reticulated Hinge-Beak Shrimp (Cinetorhynchus reticulatus)
    Reticulated Hinge-Beak Shrimp (Cinetorhynchus reticulatus). Keoki Stender

    The Reticulated Hinge-Beak Shrimp (Cinetorhynchus reticulatus) is often seen during night dives with their golden eyes. Several species occur in Hawaii, the largest species being the striped R. hiatti at 4 inches.

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    Uniform Hinge-Beak Shrimp (Cinetorhynchus concolor)

    Uniform Hinge-Beak Shrimp (Cinetorhynchus concolor)
    Uniform Hinge-Beak Shrimp (Cinetorhynchus concolor). Keoki Stender

    The Uniform Hinge-Beak Shrimp (Cinetorhynchus concolor) which is often seen during night dives with their golden eyes. Several species occur in Hawaii, the largest species being the striped R. hiatti at 4 inches.

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  • 25 of 37

    Marbled Shrimp (Saron marmoratus)

    Marbled Shrimp (Saron marmoratus)
    Marbled Shrimp (Saron marmoratus). Keoki Stender

    The Marbled Shrimp (Saron marmoratus) which is abundant on shallow reefs at night with their golden eyes revealing their presence. Their color varies from green to reddish brown. The males have longer arms than the females. There may be more than one species in Hawaii.

     

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  • 26 of 37

    Minstrel Shrimp (Metapenaeopsis hilarula)

    Minstrel Shrimp (Metapenaeopsis hilarula)
    Minstrel Shrimp (Metapenaeopsis hilarula). Keoki Stender

    The Minstrel Shrimp (Metapenaeopsis hilarula) which is occasionally spotted on night dives, buried in the sand. Related to the edible shrimp from deep water.

     

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    Mud Shrimp (Callianassa sp.)

    Mud Shrimp (Callianassa sp.)
    Mud Shrimp (Callianassa sp.). Keoki Stender

    The Mud Shrimp (Callianassa sp.) inhabits burrows in shallow water.  The body is soft and vulnerable to predators. The body of this shrimp attains 2 inches in length.

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    New Shrimp Species

    New Shrimp Species
    New Shrimp Species. Keoki Stender

    Possibly a new species found at Midway in 1999 closely related to R. uritai in Japan, this Rhynchocinetes species discovered on Midway has solid red legs, not banded brown & white. Rarely seen in small holes on shallow rubble reefs in the lagoon and in caverns in the reef front. A single specimen was trapped on 9/24/02 during the NOW-RAMP 2002 expedition.

     

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    Sea Star Shrimp (Periclimenes soror)

    Sea Star Shrimp (Periclimenes soror)
    Sea Star Shrimp (Periclimenes soror). Keoki Stender

    A Sea Star Shrimp (Periclimenes soror) which are common as pairs under various Sea Stars. Their color (in this case Purple) usually matches the color of the host. They attain a length of about 1cm.

     

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    Sea Star Shrimp (Periclimenes soror)

    Sea Star Shrimp (Periclimenes soror)
    Sea Star Shrimp (Periclimenes soror). Keoki Stender

    A Sea Star Shrimp (Periclimenes soror) which are common as pairs under various Sea Stars. Their color (in this case Yellow) usually matches the color of the host. They attain a length of about 1cm.

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    Sea Star Shrimp (Periclimenes soror)

    Sea Star Shrimp (Periclimenes soror)
    Sea Star Shrimp (Periclimenes soror). Keoki Stender

     A Sea Star Shrimp (Periclimenes soror) which are common as pairs under various Sea Stars. Their color (in this case Red) usually matches the color of the host. They attain a length of about 1cm.

     

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    Keoki's Mystery Shrimp

    Keoki's Mystery Shrimp
    Keoki's Mystery Shrimp. Keoki Stender

    From Keoki's Fish Corner, a photo of an unidentified transparent shrimp living on stinging hydroids. This shrimp was only found once at Haleiwa Trench.

     

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    Urchin Shrimp (Stegopontonia commensalis)

    Urchin Shrimp (Stegopontonia commensalis)
    Urchin Shrimp (Stegopontonia commensalis). Keoki Stender

    A rare shrimp found on Echinothrix spiny urchins and attains a length of about 2-3 inches.

     

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    Common Mantis Shrimp (Pseudosquilla ciliata)

    Common Mantis Shrimp (Pseudosquilla ciliata)
    Common Mantis Shrimp (Pseudosquilla ciliata). Keoki Stender

    The Common Mantis Shrimp (Pseudosquilla ciliata), commonly found on weedy reef flats in shallow water. Their color varies from white to green.

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    Burrowing Mantis Shrimp (Oratosquilla oratoria)

    Burrowing Mantis Shrimp (Oratosquilla oratoria)
    Burrowing Mantis Shrimp (Oratosquilla oratoria). Keoki Stender

    A Burrowing Mantis Shrimp (Oratosquilla oratoria), a large species that inhabits sandy burrows.

     

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    Peacock Mantis Shrimp

    Peacock Mantis Shrimp
    Peacock Mantis Shrimp. Keith Douglas

    The Peacock Mantis Shrimp (Odontodactylus scyllarus) is a beautiful animal, but care should be taken when adding one to your aquarium. There are two hunting categories of Mantis Shrimps: the "spearers" and the "smashers". The "spearers" use their spear-like claw to silently stab soft tissued prey. The "smashers" use their forceful, club-like claw to hit, crack open or pulverize harder bodied prey.

     

     

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  • 37 of 37

    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)

    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis)
    Pacific Cleaner Shrimp (Lysmata amboinensis). Greg Vazquez

    Many believe that this shrimp is safe with eels, however it has been shown that at least the Snowflake Eel will eat it when it becomes tired of the shrimp constantly picking at it.