Mint Lassi Recipe

Herbal lassi with bio yogurt and different herbs
Getty Images/Westend61
  • 5 mins
  • Prep: 5 mins,
  • Cook: 0 mins
  • Yield: 2 servings
Ratings (4)

A mint lassi is simply mint and yogurt -- with a bit of sweetener and lime for kicks -- whirled into a smooth and refreshing drink. Mint lassis have great flavor, but they also have tremendous power to cool, both against high temperatures outside and hot spices on a plate. Try a mint lassi to cool off on a hot afternoon, or serve it alongside spicy food at dinner to help tame the mouth-burning heat. You can even start a hot day off with one at breakfast and enjoy it as more of a smoothie.

Like the idea, but not a fan of mint? Try a Mango Lassi instead.

What You'll Need

  • 1 cup loosely packed mint leaves (plus sprigs for garnish)
  • 2 cups plain, unsweetened whole milk yogurt 
  • 2 tablespoons sugar, honey, or agave syrup, plus more to taste (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lime or lemon juice, plus more to taste

How to Make It

  1. Put the mint leaves, yogurt, sweetener (if using), and lime juice in a blender. (Note: whole milk yogurt yields the most "drinkable" lassi since it doesn't contain any thickeners, but low-fat and non-fat yogurts work fine too if you are watching your calorie intake.)
  2. Whirl until very smooth.
  3. Taste and add more sweetener or lime juice, if you like.
  4. Pour into glasses, add a mint sprig to each as a garnish, if you like, and serve.

    Make-ahead tip: Lassis can be made and kept, covered and chilled, for up to 3 days. They will require a vigorous stirring to unsettle the contents.

    For an even more refreshing version: Make your mint lassi extra cool by adding a handful of ice cubes to the blender. To make it as smooth as possible, add the ice cubes one at a time with the blender running, working each one in before adding the next one. This method will make it a bit like a slushy and the result is a drink that's beyond refreshing.

    Make it salty: Yes, salty! Salty lassis are a bit of an acquired taste for lots of people, but they can be even more refreshing than sweet ones, and a particularly good match with food. Omit the sugar or other sweeteners obviously, and add 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt to the lassi. Taste and add more salt to taste, if you think it's needed. (You want the brightness of the salt to sort of "pop" when you taste it.)

    Bump it up with ginger: For a seriously bright and kicky version, add 1/2 to 1 teaspoon freshly grated ginger to the mix. It adds both a sweet and spicy note that is lovely in the face of a hot day.