Pictures of Crochet Stitches

  • 01 of 12

    Crochet Moss Stitch -- Granite Stitch

    Crochet Moss Stitch, Also Known as Granite Stitch
    An Easy, Beginner-Friendly Crochet Stitch Crochet Moss Stitch, Also Known as Granite Stitch. Photo © Michael Solovay

    Plus Free Tutorials for Each Crochet Stitch Pattern


    Welcome to our photo gallery of crochet stitches. We invite you to browse through all these pictures to find a stitch you might like to try.


    Please note that the basic stitches are not pictured in this gallery. To see pictures of the basic stitches, please visit this page:


    Basic Crochet Stitches.


    If you're interested in Tunisian crochet stitches, be sure to check out our Tunisian crochet picture gallery too.


    These free instructions will help you...MORE learn how to do the moss stitch, which is also known as the granite stitch. This is an easy stitch requiring knowledge of only two basic crochet stitches, the single crochet and the chain stitch.


    Instructions for How to Crochet the Moss Stitch:


    • ch = chain
    • ch-1 sp = chain-1 space, the space formed when you crocheted a chain stitch in the previous row
    • rep = repeat
    • sc = single crochet
    • st = stitch

    Crochet your starting chain; you'll want to have an odd number of chains to make the pattern work out right.


    Row 1: Place a marker in the first ch from your hook. sc in 3rd ch from hook. [ch 1, skip next ch, sc in next ch.] Rep across entire row. Ch 1, turn.


    Row 2: [sc in the next ch-1 sp, ch 1.] Rep the sequence in brackets across the rest of the row. At the end of the row, work a sc st into the st where you placed the marker; you can remove the marker before working the stitch. Ch 1, turn.


    Rows 3 and Above: The rest of the rows are all exactly the same as row 2, except at the end of the row you'll work your last sc st into the turning chain of the previous row. Rep this row until your piece is the length you want it to be.


    Design Notes: I've seen several different versions of the moss stitch around; be aware that there are other possible ways you could do the stitch.


    Also, once you get the hang of this stitch, there's no need to keep placing the marker; I included instructions to place the marker only as an easy way of showing you which stitch to work into.


    Crochet Some Easy Projects Using the Moss Stitch:


    Not sure what to make using this stitch? There are many possibilities, but if you're not interested in thinking up your own design for a project to make, why not try one of the patterns I've already completed?


    Beginner's Moss Stitch Baby Blanket: This fast easy baby blanket is suitable for beginners, but it is a wonderful project for anyone of any skill level to crochet. The picture above is actually a close-up of one of my crocheted baby blanket samples. You can click here to see more pictures of this blanket if you like. My project photo gallery includes samples in other colors, plus pictures of the entire blanket.


    Simple Crochet Accessories: I've crocheted an entire set of accessories using the moss stitch. The set includes a beanie, scarf, headband, ear warmer, and pair of fingerless gloves.


    Similar Crochet Stitches:


    This stitch is much like the single crochet mesh stitch. To do the moss stitch, you place your single crochet stitches into the chain-1 spaces in the row below; to do the single crochet mesh stitch, you work your single crochet stitches into the single crochet stitches in the row below instead. Isn't it amazing how such small differences can have an effect on the way the finished fabric turns out?


    Continue to 2 of 12 below.
  • 02 of 12

    Single Crochet Mesh Stitch

    Single Crochet Mesh Stitch
    An Easy, Beginner-Friendly Crochet Stitch Single Crochet Mesh Stitch -- This Stitch Is Comprised of Alternating Chains and Single Crochet Stitches. Photo © Michael Solovay

    These free instructions will help you learn how to do the single crochet mesh stitch. This is an easy stitch requiring knowledge of only two basic crochet stitches, the single crochet and the chain stitch.


    Instructions for How to Do the Single Crochet Mesh Stitch:


    Multiple Of: This stitch is a multiple of 2 + 1. When you crochet your foundation chain, make sure that the number of chains you crochet works with that starting chain formula. When you are deciding how many chains you want to...MORE crochet, simply choose a number that is a multiple of two, and then add one stitch to that. You need that extra stitch to ensure that the sides of your piece will turn out right.


    Want to double check whether your starting chain will work or not? It's easy. Take the number of chains you've decided on; subtract one stitch, then divide the remaining number by two. If you have a whole number, it will work. If you have a fraction, it won't.



    Crochet your starting chain.


    Row 1: Sc in 3rd ch from hook. [Ch 1, skip next ch, sc in next ch.] Rep sequence in brackets all the way across the row. Ch 1, turn.


    Row 2: Sc in 1st sc, skip 1st ch, [sc in next sc, ch 1, skip next ch.] Rep sequence in brackets all the way across the row. End the row with a sc in the last st. I found that I was able to achieve straighter edges when crocheting my last stitch into the turning chain instead of crocheting it into the last sc st. You can do it either way, but whichever way you choose, be sure to be consistent. Ch 1, turn.


    Rep row 2 until the piece is the size you want it to be.


    Make a Project Using the Single Crochet Mesh Stitch:


    Easy Single Crochet Mesh Dishcloth: This dishcloth could also be used as a washcloth if you prefer. Whether you want to wash your dishes, your face or any other surface, this cloth is a great way to do it. You combine the benefits of a slightly abrasive crochet stitch with the softness of a gorgeous cotton yarn, and the result is wonderful either way.


    Similar Crochet Stitches:


    This stitch is similar to the moss stitch, also known as the granite stitch. The biggest difference between the two stitches: the spot where you place your single crochet stitches. In this version, you place your single crochet stitches into the single crochet stitches in the row below. In the moss stitch / granite stitch, you work your single crochet stitches into the chain-1 spaces in the row below. This subtle difference does have an effect on how the finished fabric looks.


    This stitch is also similar to double crochet mesh, however, the rows are much shorter, and there are fewer chains in between the stitches.


    Continue to 3 of 12 below.
  • 03 of 12

    Thick and Thin Front Loop Single Crochet Stitch

    Thick and Thin Front Loop Single Crochet Stitch
    Thick and Thin Front Loop Single Crochet Stitch. Photo © Amy Solovay

    This stitch looks delightfully lacy, but upon closer examination you'll find that it's only front loop single crochet stitch, a variation of single crochet that's created by working through the front loops only. The secret to making it look so interesting: 2 absurdly different yarn sizes. Check out this photo and scroll down for more information.


    This stitch pattern looks intricate, but it's way less complicated than it looks at first glance.


    I recommend this stitch to any crocheter who has...MORE mastered the single crochet stitch, to the point of not having any problems with maintaining an even tension.


    Here's How to Crochet This Stitch:


    Start with one yarn and one crochet thread that are drastically different sizes. For the swatch pictured here, I used Star Pearl Twist mercerized cotton crochet thread in size 8, paired with worsted weight Lily Sugar 'n' Cream kitchen cotton.


    Using the heavier yarn, crochet a series of chain stitches to serve as a starting chain.


    Row 1: Work the entire row in single crochet stitch.


    Row 2: Work the entire row in front loop single crochet stitch, which is exactly the same as single crochet except that you work through the front loops only. Before you complete the last step of the last stitch in the row, change to the finer weight thread.


    Rows 3-4: Use the thread to work 2 more rows of front loop single crochet stitch. Before you complete the last step of the last stitch, change to the heavier yarn.


    Continue crocheting two rows using the heavy yarn, then two rows of the finer weight thread, etc, until the piece is the length you want it to be.


    Tips:


    If you aren't sure how to change yarns, the process is the same as it is for changing colors in single crochet. You can click here to view a video if you would like to see this demonstrated.


    Do not change crochet hooks when you switch yarns; you want to use the same crochet hook throughout. Choose a hook that's a comfortable size for crocheting with the heavier yarn.


    Use a loose, easy tension throughout the piece. Try not to tighten up when you work your stitches in the finer thread; you don't want your stitches to pull in, and you don't want your piece to become distorted.


    Try Crocheting a Project in a Similar Stitch Pattern:


    This easy thick and thin scarf is crocheted using the same basic idea, although I worked the sample scarf in single crochet rather than front loop single crochet.


    Continue to 4 of 12 below.
  • 04 of 12

    Basic Crochet V Stitch

    Basic Crochet V Stitch
    Basic Crochet V Stitch. Photo © Michael Solovay

    In its most basic form, a v stitch is usually just a double crochet stitch, followed by a chain stitch, then another double crochet stitch, all of which are crocheted into the same stitch or space. There are zillions of possible stitch patterns you could construct using the basic v stitch. One of them is pictured below.


    Pictured here is one of the simplest and most common v stitch configurations. All the v stitches are stacked on top of each other, and there are no chains or other stitches...MORE separating the vs.


    I've created a free tutorial to help you learn the basic v stitch.


    V Stitch Crochet Project


    If you'd like to try a project using this stitch, my lace scarf pattern is a great starter pattern for learning the stitch.


    More About V Stitch:


    • Crochet V Stitch -- Everything you ever wanted to know about the v stitch, plus links to bunches of free patterns and tutorials for crocheting different projects and variations using vs.
    • Lacy Interrupted V Stitch -- A quick, pretty, lacy, interesting stitch pattern worked with vs and other basic stitches.
    • Alternating Vs and Double Crochets Video -- By watching this video, you can learn how to crochet a stitch pattern featuring v stitches that alternate with double crochet stitches.

    Continue to 5 of 12 below.
  • 05 of 12

    V Stitch in Brick Repeat

    Crochet V Stitch in Brick Repeat
    Crochet V Stitch in Brick Repeat. Photo © Amy Solovay

    You've probably seen crochet v stitch patterns where the v stitches in rows 2 and up are each crocheted into the v stitches below them. This pattern is constructed differently, in that the vs are offset in a repeating pattern resembling brickwork.


    Want to try crocheting this stitch? Get the free instructions here.


    Want to crochet a project using this stitch? The fancy fur scarf is one possibility. Feel free to dream up others if you like.


    More V Stitches:


    Continue to 6 of 12 below.
  • 06 of 12

    Solid Shell Stitch

    Crochet Shell Stitch
    Crochet Shell Stitch. Photo © Amy Solovay

    Shell Stitch is a vintage crochet stitch pattern that's still popular with crocheters today.


    I've come across shell stitch patterns and instructions in a variety of different publications. Shell stitch instructions were included in vintage Peterson's magazines dated 1855, 1858 and 1859, among others.


    Don't worry, you won't have to hunt for old crochet instruction manuals at your local antique store; you can learn how to crochet the shell stitch right here on our website, for free.


    Click Here to Go...MORE to Our Free Shell Stitch Tutorial.

    Free Crochet Patterns Using Shell Stitch:


    The shell stitch is a nice stitch for using with many different types of projects, but it's especially nice for edgings and afghans.


    Continue to 7 of 12 below.
  • 07 of 12

    Treble Shell Stitch

    Treble Crochet Shell Stitch
    A Tall Shell Stitch Variation Worked Using Treble Crochet Treble Crochet Shell Stitch. Photo © Amy Solovay

    This stitch is a variation of the popular basic crochet shell stitch. This version of the shell stitch utilizes the treble crochet stitch to create tall, bold shells. There are bunches of different ways you could do this; I’m giving you a set of instructions that I worked out, but it would be interesting to experiment with other possibilities, as there could be many possible approaches.


    Materials Needed:


    Yarn or Crochet Thread: You can work this stitch in any yarn or crochet thread you like. I’ve...MORE used three different colors of Caron Simply Soft yarn to crochet my sample swatch pictured here. The colors I used are as follows:


    • Color A: Strawberry, the bright pink colored yarn
    • Color B: Autumn Maize, the golden tan colored yarn
    • Color C: Chocolate, the dark brown colored yarn

    Feel free to use other yarn colors and / or brands.


    This color combination is prettier in real life than it looks on the computer screen; the colors just aren't as nice in the photo, despite my best efforts to make them look like the original.


    To crochet the striped design as pictured, work a row of color A, then a row of color B, then a row of color C, then start the pattern over with another row of color A, then B, then C, repeating again and again until the piece is the length you want it to be.


    You can also crochet this stitch pattern in one color if you like, or you can vary the number of colors used.


    To crochet the swatch as pictured, I used a size I / 5.5 mm crochet hook, which works well with worsted weight yarn. If you use a different yarn weight, you’ll want to choose an appropriate hook for the yarn or thread you’ve chosen. Check your yarn label for a suggested hook size if you aren’t sure which hook to use.


    Other: Tapestry needle for weaving in ends.


    Crochet Abbreviations Used on This Page:



    Design Notes: If you want to work with more than one color, you’ll need to know how to change colors. Check out our free video on switching colors in crochet.


    Before you complete the last step of the last stitch in each row, change to the next color you want to work with.


    This stitch is a multiple of 8 + 3 sts.


    Stitch Instructions:


    Crochet a length of chain stitches that works with the starting chain formula mentioned above.


    Row 1: Work a hdc st in the third ch from your hook. [Skip 3 ch sts. Work 7 tr in next ch. Skip next 3 ch sts. Hdc in next ch st.] Rep the sequence in brackets all the way across the row.


    Row 2: Ch 4, turn. Your turning chain counts as the first tr in the row. Work 3 more tr into the same st to create a half-shell. [Work a hdc in the center of the next shell, then work 7 tr into the next hdc st.] Rep the sequence in brackets all the way across the row. At the end of the row, work a hdc st into the center of the last shell, then work 4 tr into the last hdc.


    Row 3: Ch 2, turn. Hdc in first st. [Work 7 tr in next hdc st, work a hdc st in the center of the next shell.] Rep the sequence in brackets all the way across the row. End the row by working 7 tr into the next hdc st, then working a hdc st into the turning chain.


    Rep rows 2 and 3 for the pattern repeat.


    There are many different possible variations of the shell stitch. Want to see more? Check out our page of shell stitches, with free instructions.


    Continue to 8 of 12 below.
  • 08 of 12

    Lacy Treble Shell Stitch

    Lacy Treble Shell Stitch
    Lacy Treble Shell Stitch. Photo © Amy Solovay

    The lacy treble shell stitch is a variation of the ever-popular vintage shell stitch.


    To crochet the lacy treble shell stitch, you combine treble crochets with chains to form the shells; then you alternate the shells with half double crochet stitches. When crocheted with worsted weight yarn, this stitch appears both bold and delicate at the same time. Bold because of the large size of the shells, and delicate because of the lace factor. Want the stitch to appear more delicate than bold? That’s...MORE easy; just reduce the size of the yarn you’re using; this stitch would be lovely if worked in a lace weight yarn or a fine crochet thread.


    Materials Needed:


    Yarn or Crochet Thread: You can work this stitch in any yarn or crochet thread you like. I’ve used two different colors of Caron Simply Soft yarn to crochet my sample swatch pictured here.


    • Color A: Strawberry, the bright pink colored yarn
    • Color B: The lighter pink colored yarn; I accidentally misplaced my yarn label, so I am not 100% sure which color this is. I think it is the color called "Soft Pink," but it's also possible that it could be "Victorian Rose" or another color.

    Feel free to use other yarn colors and / or brands.


    To crochet the striped design as pictured, work a row of color A, then a row of color B, then start the pattern over with another row of color A, then B, then A, then B, repeating again and again until the piece is the length you want it to be.


    You can also crochet this stitch pattern in one color if you like, or you can vary the number of colors used. I've posted pictures of a scarf made using this stitch in three colors of yarn. If you'd like to take a look at those pictures, you can see a close-up here and several more scarf photos here.


    To crochet the swatch as pictured, I used a size I / 5.5 mm crochet hook, which works well with worsted weight yarn. If you use a different yarn weight, you’ll want to choose an appropriate hook for the yarn or thread you’ve chosen. Check your yarn label for a suggested hook size if you aren’t sure which hook to use.


    Other: Tapestry needle for weaving in ends.


    Crochet Abbreviations Used on This Page:



    Special Stitch: The Lacy Shell -- Work the following sequence into the same chain stitch or half double crochet stitch, as directed by the instructions below: *tr, ch 1, tr, ch 1, tr, ch 1, tr*


    Design Notes:


    When you are directed to work into the center of a lacy shell, work into the center ch-1 space in the shell – the second of the three ch-1 spaces you crocheted when working the lacy shell in the previous row.


    If you want to work with more than one color, you’ll need to know how to change colors. Check out our free video on switching colors in crochet.


    Before you complete the last step of the last stitch in each row, change to the next color you want to work with.


    Starting Chain Formula:


    This stitch is a multiple of 8 + 3 stitches.


    Practice Projects:


    If you want to try out this stitch, you could crochet a swatch of it. But wouldn’t it be better to crochet a useful project at the same time you’re making your sample? Here are a couple of choices:


    Stitch Instructions:


    Crochet a series of chain stitches that works with the starting chain formula for this stitch pattern.


    Row 1: Work a hdc st in the third ch from your hook. [Skip 3 ch sts. In the next ch, work a lacy shell. Skip next 3 ch sts. Hdc in next ch st.] Rep the sequence in brackets all the way across the row.


    Row 2: Ch 4, turn. Your turning chain counts as the first tr in the row. Work another tr into the same st, ch 1, then work another tr into the same st. [Work a hdc in the center of the next lacy shell, then work a lacy shell into the next hdc st.] Rep the sequence in brackets all the way across the row. At the end of the row, work a hdc st into the center of the last shell, then work a tr into the last hdc, ch 1, then work 2 more tr into the same st.


    Row 3: Ch 2, turn. Hdc in first st. [Work a lacy shell in next hdc st, work a hdc st in the center of the next lacy shell.] Rep the sequence in brackets all the way across the row. End the row by working a lacy shell into the next hdc st, then working a hdc st into the turning chain.


    Rep rows 2 and 3 for the pattern repeat.


    Update: These instructions were updated on 1-6-2013 to correct a mistake in row 3. If your copy is older than that, you may wish to print out the update.


    Continue to 9 of 12 below.
  • 09 of 12

    Staggered Spike Stitch Stripes

    Staggered Spike Stitch Stripes
    Staggered Spike Stitch Stripes. Photo © Amy Solovay

    Stitch Instructions:


    To crochet this stitch pattern as pictured, you'll need two colors of yarn or crochet thread, colors A and B. In my sample swatch, color A is called "Bone" and color B is called "Autumn Red." These are both colors of Caron's Simply Soft, which is a worsted weight acrylic yarn.


    Abbreviations Used in This Pattern:



    Spike Stitch: In this pattern, a spike stitch is defined as being a single crochet stitch that is...MORE worked into the row below where you'd ordinarily work it.


    How to Change Colors: The linked tutorial shows you how to change colors, step by step. You'll want to do your color changes before completing the last step of the last stitch at the end of the specified row.


    This stitch is a multiple of 4.


    Work 1 ch st between each row as a turning chain.


    Crochet your foundation chain using color A.


    Rows 1-2: Single crochet across entire row. At the end of the second row, change colors to color B.


    Row 3: [1 sc in ea of the next 3 sc sts. Work 1 spike stitch in the next sc.] Rep the sequence in brackets all the way across the row. When you get to the end of the row, work 1 sc in ea of the last 3 sts. At the end of the row, change to color A.


    Rows 4-5: Single crochet. At the end of row 5, change to color B.


    Row 6: sc in 1st st. [Spike stitch in next st, then work 1 sc in ea of the next 3 sts.] Rep sequence in brackets all the way across the row. sc in the last st in the row. At the end of the row, change to color A.


    Rep rows 1-6 until the piece is the length you want it to be.


    Continue to 10 of 12 below.
  • 10 of 12

    Checkered Diamond Stitch in Filet Crochet

    Checkered Diamond Stitch in Filet Crochet
    Checkered Diamond Stitch in Filet Crochet. Photo and Stitch Pattern © Amy Solovay

    If you're looking for a versatile stitch pattern in filet crochet, the checkered diamond stitch is one possibility. You could use it for making curtains, bedspreads, table linens, or just about anything else.


    I posted two different versions of this chart. One version repeats in a seamless tile so that you can crochet a piece that's exactly the size you want. The other version is this basic design in a square.


    Click Here to Get Charts and Instructiosn for the Checkered Diamond Stitch.


    Continue to 11 of 12 below.
  • 11 of 12

    Crocodile Stitch

    Crocodile Stitch
    Crocodile Stitch. Video Screenshot © About.com

    The crocodile stitch is a unique stitch that resembles a softer, snugglier crocheted version of the scales on a crocodile. Some people also call this the crocodile scale stitch.


    The crocodile stitch is an intriguing three-dimensional stitch that uses lots of yarn and requires some patience to master.


    If you're interested in learning to crochet this stitch, the following resources will help.


    Free Crocodile Stitch Video: In this video, you'll see how the stitches are crocheted as Lucille...MORE demonstrates the technique. This video will really help you visualize the stitch and how to crochet it, but unfortunately, the video does not explain every step in the process from start to finish; you might want to look at it in addition to some other resources.


    Crocodile Stitch Fashions Book -- This book features crochet patterns utilizing the crocodile stitch, with instructions and some step-by-step photos for getting started with crocheting the stitch. You can click here to compare prices for this book online at a comparison search engine. You'll also find more information about the book.


    At the Crochetme.com Website: Toni Rexroat posted a crocodile stitch tutorial showing photos of how a slightly different version of the stitch is done. The photo you see above shows the crocodile stitch with offset scales; Toni's tutorial shows you how to do a version of the stitch where the scales are not offset. (Note that you will probably need to close a popup window in order to see the tutorial).


    See More Crochet Stitches: Return to the photo gallery index.


    Continue to 12 of 12 below.
  • 12 of 12

    Puff Lace Stitch With Half Double Crochet Vs

    Puff Lace Stitch With Half Double Crochet Vs
    A Reversible Crochet Stitch Puff Lace Stitch With Half Double Crochet Vs. Photo © Michael Solovay

    What do you get when you combine puff stitches, half double crochets, and the v-stitch? Well, there are zillions of different ways you could do that, but the photo above shows you one of my favorite ideas. It's a fancy, lacy stitch with plenty of texture and eye appeal.


    This is a reversible stitch pattern that would be suitable for making projects where both sides might be visible at times -- think scarves, shawls, wraps, etc. It's also a marvelous stitch for use in other types of projects.


    Abbrevi...MOREations Used in This Stitch Pattern:


    • ch = chain
    • hdc = half double crochet
    • hdc v st = half double crochet v-stitch; see "special stitches" section below for instructions.
    • rep = repeat
    • st = stitch
    • [] = brackets denote a set of instructions to be repeated. Repeat the instructions inside the brackets the specified number of times.
    • * = asterisks also denote a set of instructions to be repeated.

    Special Stitches: This stitch pattern utilizes a couple of special stitches, defined below:


    Puff Stitch


    To work this stitch:


    • Begin as you usually would for the half double crochet: wrap the yarn over your hook.
    • Insert it into the next stitch to be worked.
    • Grab the yarn and pull it through.
    • DO NOT complete the half double crochet.
    • Instead, wrap the yarn over the hook again.
    • Insert the hook into the same stitch as before.
    • Grab the yarn and pull it through.
    • Repeat the same steps again until you have 5 unfinished half-double crochet stitches in progress. There will be 11 loops on your hook all together.
    • To close the stitch, wrap the yarn over your hook, grab it and carefully pull it through all the loops on your hook.
    • Ch 1.

    Half Double Crochet V-Stitch


    This version of the v-stitch is made just like a standard v-stitch, with one exception: you'll use half double crochet stitches instead of double crochets.


    • Hdc in next st to be worked.
    • Ch 1.
    • Hdc in same st.

    Stitch Multiple: This stitch is a multiple of 6 + 5.


    What that means: One repeat of this pattern is 6 stitches. So, if you want to end up with (for example) 5 repeats of the stitch pattern, you'd multiply 6 x 5 to get 30 stitches. The "+ 5" is for the extra stitches you need at the beginning and end to make the edges of the fabric. So you'd take your 30 stitches and add 5 to get a total of 35. 35 would be the number of chain stitches you'd crochet to create your starting chain.


    Instructions for Crocheting the Puff Lace Stitch With Half Double Crochet Vs


    Calculate the amount of chains needed to work your starting chain, and crochet that number of chain stitches.


    Row 1: Hdc in 3rd ch from hook. [* ch 1, skip next 2 sts, hdc v st in next st, ch 1, skip next 2 sts, * puff st in next st.] Rep the sequence in brackets across the row. Rep sequence between *s, then work 1 hdc in each of the last 2 sts.


    ch 2, turn.


    Row 2: Your turning chain counts as the first hdc st in the row. Hdc in next st. [Ch 1, puff st in next hdc v-st, ch 1, hdc v-st in next puff st, ch 1.] Work 1 hdc st in each of the last 2 sts.


    ch 2, turn.


    Row 3: Your turning chain counts as the first hdc st in the row. [* Ch 1, work a hdc v-st in next puff st, ch 1, * work a puff st in next hdc v-st, ch 1.] Rep the sequence in between brackets across the row. Work the sequence in between *s, then work 1 hdc st in each of the last 2 sts in the row.


    Repeat rows 2 and 3 until the piece is the size you want it to be.


    More Stitches:


    References


    I don't remember ever having seen this particular crochet stitch anywhere before, although I'm sure someone somewhere has probably already discovered it, or at least something similar, in the past. I drew inspiration from the following pages when looking at puff stitch crochet stitch patterns.



    Corticelli Lessons in Crochet, Book No. 13

    Published by the Corticelli Silk Mills

    Copyright 1920 by the Nonotuck Silk Co. in Florence, Mass.



    The Harmony Guide to Crochet Stitches, Volume One

    Copyright 1986 by Lyric Books, Limited

    ISBN Number: 0 7111 0028 4

    Compiled by James Walters and Sylvia Cosh;

    Photography by James Walters