30 Different Types of Orange Flowers

Orange ballerina tulips blooming

The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

Not as bright as yellow flowers and not as "in your face" as red flowers, orange flowers still inject plenty of cheer into the landscape, whether solo or in combinations. Combining orange and blue flowers can be particularly stunning. In addition to flowers of all forms, orange can be displayed via berries and even seed pods.

Here are 30 types of orange flowers for your garden.

  • 01 of 30

    Lantana (Lantana camara)

    Lantana plant with tiny white and orange flower clusters on end of stem closeup

    The Spruce / Gyscha Rendy

    Lantana flowers bloom from midsummer to the first frost of fall with clusters of tiny bright blooms. The leaves of the plant are dark green and oval with a wrinkled texture. They also have a fragrance to them. These tropical plants are often grown as annuals in areas that experience frost, and the flowers are quite attractive to butterflies. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Orange, red, yellow, white, purple
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 02 of 30

    Orange Lily (Lilium bulbiferum var. croceum)

    Orange lily flowers with light orange petals with small brown spots on some petals

    The Spruce / Gyscha Rendy

    The orange lily is a vibrant lily species with showy orange flowers that have red accents and brown spots. This lily blooms in the early summer, with mature bulbs sending up around six flowers on average. Once the plants are done flowering, cut back the foliage when it turns yellow.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Orange
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 03 of 30

    Pocketbook Plant (Calceolaria crenatiflora)

    Calceolaria flowers

    Juergen Ritterbach / Getty Images

    The pocketbook plant is a tropical flower that blooms seasonally in its native climate. In northern climates it can be kept in a greenhouse, as long as the temperature stays around 65 degrees Fahrenheit. It also can be grown as an annual. The blooms stretch up to 2 inches across and feature a larger lower petal.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Orange, yellow, red, bicolor
    • Sun Exposure: Part shade to full shade
    • Soil Needs: Medium moisture, well-drained
  • 04 of 30

    Pansy (Viola x wittrockiana)

    orange pansy flowers

    Kouichi Tsunoda / Getty Images

    Pansies are popular flowers for the garden, coming in a wide range of colors and blooming in the mid-spring to early summer. The flowers stretch around 2 to 4 inches across and have a fairly flat appearance. Remove the spent flowers to promote further blooming.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 6 to 10
    • Color Varieties: Orange, red, pink, yellow, blue, purple, maroon, white, bicolor
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Humusy, moist, well-drained
    Continue to 5 of 30 below.
  • 05 of 30

    Flowering Maple (Abutilon x hybridum)

    flowering maple's orange flower

    Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

    Flowering maple appears like a small maple tree except that it bears bell-shaped flowers that can come in several colors. These subtropical plants are sensitive to frost, so they should be moved outside over the winter unless you want to grow them as an annual. In their native climate, they bloom seasonally and are evergreen. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 10
    • Color Varieties: Orange, yellow, red, pink, white
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Rich, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 06 of 30

    Tulip (Tulipa spp.)

    Orange ballerina tulips closeup

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    Tulips are found in many gardens, coming in a plethora of colors except for a true blue. Plant your tulip bulbs around 4 to 6 inches deep in the fall, and they’ll pop up in the spring with their vibrant cup-shaped flowers. Once the foliage turns yellow, then remove it from the plant. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Color Varieties: All colors but blue
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Rich, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 07 of 30

    Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa)

    Butterfly weed with orange flowers and buds closeup

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    Butterfly weed is native to the eastern and southern United States, growing in small clumps that reach around 1 to 3 feet high. In the summertime, the plants bear clusters of small, bright orange flowers on hairy stems that are highly attractive to butterflies. The flowers give way to seed pods, which should be removed promptly if you want to limit the plants’ spread.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Orange, yellow
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Average, dry to medium moisture, well-drained
  • 08 of 30

    Chinese Lantern (Physalis alkekengi)

    Chinese lantern plant flowers

    Joshua McCullough / Getty Images

    Chinese lantern is a perennial that grows in clumps reaching around 1 to 2 feet in height and spread. In the summer, the plant bears small white flowers that are followed by the plant’s showy feature: its orange-red calyx (a sort of seed pod). The calyces look like small lanterns hanging off the plant, hence its common name. This plant spreads readily in optimal conditions, so consider planting it in a contained area if you want to limit its spread.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 9
    • Color Varieties: White flowers, orange-red calyx
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Average, moist, well-drained
    Continue to 9 of 30 below.
  • 09 of 30

    Oriental Poppy (Papaver orientale)

    poppies in a field

    Malgorzata Beldowska / Getty Images

    Oriental poppies add vivid color to the landscape in the summertime with blooms that have the texture of crepe paper. The plants grow in small clumps with gray-green foliage, which degrades soon after a plant is done flowering. Adding a layer of mulch can help to insulate the plants over the winter. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 7
    • Color Varieties: Orange, red
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Rich, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 10 of 30

    Calendula (Calendula officinalis)

    Beautiful orange calendula officinalis on stem

    BasieB / Getty Images

    Calendula, also known as pot marigolds, are popular annuals for the garden. They’re easily grown from seed, which you can start indoors around seven weeks before your last projected frost date or outdoors after your last frost. The chrysanthemum-like blooms can stretch a few inches across, and removing spent flowers can promote additional blooming. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 2 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Orange, yellow
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 11 of 30

    Montbretia (Crocosmia 'Lucifer')

    Crocosmia Lucifer with orange-red flowers

    Nikki Hudson Photography / Getty Images

    Montbretia is commonly seen in floral arrangements. Its foliage resembles that of the iris while its flowers are reminiscent of freesias. The plants reach around 2 to 4 feet tall and should be protected with a layer of mulch over the winter in the northern part of their growing zones.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Red-orange
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Rich, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 12 of 30

    Canna Lily (Canna spp.)

    Canna lily with bright orange and yellow petals on end of stem closeup

    The Spruce / Gyscha Rendy

    Despite its common name, the canna lily is not a member of the genus Lilium and therefore not a true lily. But it has lovely orange blooms that look similar to lilies, and it grows up to 5 feet in height. In cold climates, you can dig up and store canna bulbs for the winter.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 7 to 10
    • Color Varieties: Red, orange, yellow, pink, cream
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Rich, moist, well-drained
    Continue to 13 of 30 below.
  • 13 of 30

    Zinnia (Zinnia elegans)

    Orange zinnias

    Garden Photo World/Georgianna Lane / Getty Images

    Zinnias are beloved annuals in the garden for their bright blooms that come in a variety of colors, including several shades of orange. Seeds can be planted after the threat of frost has passed, and then more seeds can be added every few weeks to ensure a continuous supply of blooms into summertime. Remove spent flowers to promote additional blooming.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 2 to 11
    • Color Varieties: All colors but blue and brown
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Humusy, moist, well-drained
  • 14 of 30

    Trumpet Vine (Campsis radicans)

    trumpet vine flowers

    DigiPub / Getty Images

    The trumpet vine is a vigorous climbing vine that looks stunning when given a support structure, such as an arbor, trellis, or fence. It blooms in the summertime with vibrant orange to red, trumpet-shaped flowers. Hummingbirds tend to enjoy these flowers. Be prepared to prune back the vine as needed to contain its growth.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Orange, red
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 15 of 30

    New Guinea Impatiens (Impatiens hawkeri)

    New Guinea impatiens flowers

    Cappi Thompson / Getty Images

    New Guinea impatiens are easy-to-grow flowers that are popular annuals outside of their growing zones. They produce large, flat, five-petal blooms that can come in many different colors. It is possible to overwinter them indoors by a sunny window. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 12
    • Color Varieties: Orange, pink, red, purple, white
    • Sun Exposure: Part shade
    • Soil Needs: Rich, moist, well-drained
  • 16 of 30

    Nasturtium (Tropaeolum spp.)

    Nasturtiums (Tropaeolum) flowers

    Anne Green-Armytage / Getty Images

    Nasturtium flowers bloom throughout the summer and into early fall, which adds interest to the garden long after many other flowers have faded. These annuals don’t like very hot weather and will appreciate some shade from strong afternoon sun. Otherwise, they are quite easy to grow and can even handle some drought.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 2 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Orange, red, cream, yellow
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, well-drained
    Continue to 17 of 30 below.
  • 17 of 30

    American Bittersweet (Celastrus scandens)

    bittersweet berries

    amy kimball / Getty Images

    With reddish-orange fruit encased in a peeling golden husk, it's no wonder that bittersweet berries are a favorite among fall crafts enthusiasts. However, if you wish to grow your own bittersweet berries in North America, plant the native American bittersweet. The Oriental bittersweet plants are invasive. This vining plant can be grown on a support structure or left to trail on the ground.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Greenish-white to yellow flowers, yellow-orange fruits
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 18 of 30

    Mexican Sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia)

    Mexican sunflower in bloom
    Troy Arnold/Getty Images

    The Mexican sunflower is an annual that can get quite large at around 4 to 6 feet tall with a 2- to 3-foot spread. Its bright orange blooms are attractive to butterflies. Deadheading the flowers (removing the spent blooms) can encourage additional blooming.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 2 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Orange-red with yellow center
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Average, dry to medium moisture, well-drained
  • 19 of 30

    Crown Imperial (Fritillaria Imperialis)

    Fritillaria imperialis (Crown Imperial) flowers

    Nickola Beck / Getty Images

    Crown imperial is a spring-flowering bulb with attention-grabbing red, yellow, or orange blooms. Because the flowers nod their heads down, it can be difficult to appreciate the inside of the "bell." But the inner markings are exquisite and include six round, shiny, white dots near the base of each petal. A layer of mulch over the bulbs can help to protect them over the winter.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Red, orange, yellow
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Rich, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 20 of 30

    Daylily (Hemerocallis fulva)

    Daylily flower with light orange petals and buds on arching stem closeup

    The Spruce / Gyscha Rendy

    Dayliles grow in clumps that reach a few feet in height and spread. And in the summertime they bloom with showy orange flowers atop arching stems. These plants are fairly tolerant to many different growing conditions, including heat and humidity. Divide the clumps when they’ve become overgrown to keep the plants healthy. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Orange
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, well-drained
    Continue to 21 of 30 below.
  • 21 of 30

    Begonia (Begonia spp.)

    Begonia flowers with small curling orange flowers on end of branch with large leaves closeup

    The Spruce / Gyscha Rendy

    The Begonia genus is quite large, filled with frost-tender perennials that many gardeners grow as annuals. The flowers come in a variety of colors, including a vivid orange. The plants are susceptible to mildew and rot, especially in high humidity. Make sure to space them, so they have plenty of air circulation to combat this.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Red, pink, orange, white, bicolor
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs:  Rich, moist, well-drained
  • 22 of 30

    California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica)

    California poppies

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    California poppies are native to the western United States, blooming in the late spring to early summer with cup-shaped, four-petal flowers. The flowers close up at night and on cloudy days. Remove spent flowers to promote additional blooming, but leave some flower heads to spread seeds if you want continued growth.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 6 to 10
    • Color Varieties: Orange, yellow-orange
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Sandy, well-drained
  • 23 of 30

    Gerbera Daisy (Gerbera jamesonii)

    Orange gerbera daisies

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    Gerbera daisies sport bright, showy flowers that stretch roughly 4 inches across. The flowers rise above the dark green foliage on a bare stem. These plants bloom seasonally in their natural environment. In cooler climates they are often grown as annuals. Or they can be overwintered indoors, though this is not always successful. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 8 to 10
    • Color Varieties: Orange, red, yellow
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Rich, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 24 of 30

    Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium)

    Orange mums

    Cappi Thompson / Getty Images

    Chrysanthemums, or garden mums, are a clump-forming perennial that reaches around 2 to 3 feet in height and spread. The flowers start blooming in the late summer or early fall and continue until frost. For bushier growth, pinch back the stems from late spring to the middle of summer.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Orange, gold, bronze, yellow, purple, red
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Rich, moist, well-drained
    Continue to 25 of 30 below.
  • 25 of 30

    Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus)

    orange carnations

    y-studio / Getty Images

    Carnations are a popular cut flower thanks to their beauty and fragrance. And they can be just as enjoyable in the garden, blooming in the early summer with the flowers on tall stems over gray-green foliage. Planting them in soil that’s rich in organic matter is ideal, as it will help to retain adequate soil moisture. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Pink, purple, white, yellow, orange
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Average, moist, well-drained
  • 26 of 30

    Marigold (Tagetes spp.)

    Marigold flowers with bright orange frilly petals clumped on top of stems

    The Spruce / Gyscha Rendy

    Marigolds are popular annuals for the garden, sporting bright blooms from early summer until frost arrives in the fall. The flower are frilly and fragrant, and even the foliage has an aroma. Pinch back young plants for bushier growth, and remove spent flowers for continued blooming.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 2 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Red, orange, yellow, bicolor
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Average, moist, well-drained
  • 27 of 30

    Rose (Rosa spp.)

    orange roses

    Masako Ishida / Getty Images

    Roses come in a wide array of shapes and colors, including orange flowers. The genus contains plants that are both climbing and bushy, with some blooming several times a growing season and others only blooming once. In general, avoid overhead watering on rose plants, as this can promote fungal growth.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Red, orange, yellow, white, pink
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Loamy, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 28 of 30

    Iris (Iris spp.)

    orange iris

    By Eve Livesey / Getty Images

    Like roses, the Iris genus also is quite diverse. In general, iris flowers have drooping outer petals with upright inner petals. And they come in varying shades. Removing spent flowers can help to prolong the blooming, which typically occurs from late spring into summer.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 10
    • Color Varieties: Purple, blue, white, yellow, orange
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Rich, moist, well-drained
    Continue to 29 of 30 below.
  • 29 of 30

    Sneezeweed (Helenium autumnale)

    Sneezeweed

    The Spruce / Adrienne Legault

    Sneezeweed is a clump-forming perennial that’s native to North America. It blooms profusely with daisy-like flowers in the late summer and into fall, attracting butterflies. This plant is generally low-maintenance and easy to grow. Cut back the plant by half after it’s done flowering to keep it healthy and vibrant.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Yellow, orange, gold, copper, red
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Rich, moist, well-drained
  • 30 of 30

    Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia reginae)

    Bird of Paradise

    The Spruce / Letícia Almeida

    Bird of paradise plants are known for their bold floral design. The flowers almost have the appearance of a bird’s head with a pointed beak. They’re mostly orange but with blue accents. These tropical plants can be grown indoors, as long as they have a sunny window.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 12
    • Color Varieties: Orange
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Loamy, moist, well-drained