30 Best Plants With Purple Flowers for Growing Outdoors

purple crocus flowers

The Spruce / Adrienne Legault

Purple flowers and purple foliage plants have a soothing effect when used in the landscape. Bearing a color that has long been a symbol of royalty, purple flowers also suggest richness and elegance. Purple plants are available in many shade variations, from graceful lavender to dark and rich violet. They come in spring bulbs, fall-blooming wildflowers, ground covers, climbing plants, and more.

Tip

Plant the same flower in various purple shades for added interest in your garden. Also, incorporate plants with purple foliage to add texture.

Here are 30 plants with purple flowers to add beautiful hues to your garden.

  • 01 of 30

    May Night Salvia (Salvia x sylvestris 'May Night')

    May night salvia plant with deep purple flower spikes

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    May Night salvia, a deep bluish-purple perennial, produces small blooms on flower spikes about 2 feet tall. It is known for its long blooming period from May through June, making it a valuable landscape plant. Like other salvias, this one is a great choice for perennial borders, cottage gardens, butterfly gardens, or wildflower gardens. Early spring is the best time to cut plants back to encourage fresh new growth.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Purple with blue tints
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Well-drained
  • 02 of 30

    Caradonna Salvia (Salvia nemorosa 'Caradonna')

    Caradonna salvia plant with small light purple flowers and buds on slender stalks

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    Caradonna salvia is similar to May Night, but it is a deeper shade of purple and features a more slender flower stalk that highlights the flowers. It grows 1 to 2 feet high. And like other salvias, it has a very long bloom period from June to September. It does well in dry conditions, but it flowers best if it gets regular moisture. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Deep shades of purple
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Well-drained, moist
  • 03 of 30

    Lamium (Lamium maculatum 'Purple Dragon', Lamium purpureum)

    Purple Lamium
    Neil Holmes/Getty Images

    Lamium maculatum is perhaps best known as a ground cover plant with silvery foliage, but the cultivar 'Purple Dragon' adds light purple flowers. Lamium purpureum (also known as purple dead nettle) grows no more than about 9 inches tall with purplish foliage and red-purple flowers. Lamium plants don't tolerate foot traffic, so they should be situated out of the way. Leaves also will easily scorch, so it's best to keep the plants away from direct sun.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Purple, pink, mauve, red, white
    • Sun Exposure: Shade
    • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 04 of 30

    Allium (Allium spp.)

    purple allium

    The Spruce / Letícia Almeida

    Alliums are a welcome addition to the landscape, not only for their color but also for the globular shape. The flower head is made of clusters of individual florets that create the full and lush round shape. Like other spring-flowering bulbs, they need to be planted in the fall. Heights range from 2 to 5 feet, depending on variety. And flowering occurs in the late spring to early summer.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 10
    • Color Varieties: Purple, pink, yellow, white, green
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Slightly acidic, well-drained
    Continue to 5 of 30 below.
  • 05 of 30

    Petunia (Petunia x hybrida)

    Petunia plant with trumpet-shaped ruffled purple flowers and buds closeup

    The Spruce / Autumn Wood

    Petunias are one of the most well-known purple flowers, recognized by their wide, trumpet-shaped blooms. The petals come in a variety of looks, including double blooms, ruffled, smooth, striped, and solid colors. Petunias are commonly used in hanging baskets, in window boxes, and as bedding plants. They bloom from early May right up until frost. And they need lots of sun and water to keep them full and blooming.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Pink, purple, yellow, orange, red, green, white
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Rich, moist, well-drained
  • 06 of 30

    Columbine (Aquilegia vulgaris)

    Columbine plant with blue-purple flowers on thin red stems

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    Columbine plants have delicate flowers that appear in April and May. Aquilegia vulgaris and its cultivars mature at about 1 to 3 feet tall. They work well in cottage gardens and rock gardens. Although this plant loves the sun, it does not like excess heat. Add a layer of mulch around the plant to keep the roots cool and moist.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Blue, orange, pink, purple, red, white, yellow
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Sandy or loamy, medium moisture, well-drained
  • 07 of 30

    Larkspur (Consolida ajacis)

    Consolida ajacis purple flowers
    jessicahyde / Getty Images

    True larkspurs are annual flowers (Consolida ajacis is the most common species grown in gardens) that are tough and hardy. These plants grow to around 3 to 4 feet tall, with spiky blooms that show up on the main stalk. They grow quickly from seed, blooming in spring and summer. These annuals may self-seed freely, producing plants year after year. But be aware that larkspurs are poisonous, so avoid planting them where pets and children will be present.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 2 to 10
    • Color Varieties: Purple, white, blue
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Medium moisture, well-drained
  • 08 of 30

    Lobelia (Lobelia erinus)

    Lobelia plant with small blue-purple flowers in between leaves and small white flower clusters

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    Lobelia blooms from summer through the first frost. There are numerous varieties of lobelia plants, but the cultivars providing blue/purple flowers are usually Lobelia eranus. Lobelia flowers have five petals, and some have white eyes. They don't need deadheading (removing spent blooms) because they self-clean. If they suffer from heat, revive the plants by cutting them back and then providing regular water.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Blue, purple, pink, white, red
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Rich, moist, well-drained
    Continue to 9 of 30 below.
  • 09 of 30

    Jackman's Clematis (Clematis 'Jackmanii')

    Jackman's clematis

    The Spruce / Adrienne Legault

    Jackman's clematis is a flowering vine that produces large, deep purple flowers in mid-summer. The profuse flowers have four velvety petals. The vines are best trained to climb on trellises, arbors, walls, and fences. A trick to success with clematis vines is growing the plants in sunlight but keeping the roots cool. This can be achieved by mulching the root area or adding short plants over the root zone to provide ground shade.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Lavender to deep purple
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Rich, moist, well-drained
  • 10 of 30

    Heliotrope (Heliotrope spp.)

    Heliotrope plant with small light purple and dark purple flower clusters on top of leaves

    The Spruce / Krystal Slagle

    Heliotrope is a shrub-like plant with clusters of fragrant blooms, growing 1 to 4 feet high. These plants begin blooming in summer and continue through the first frost. Maintaining even soil moisture is key in their growth. They will wither away in both soil that is too dry or too soggy. Moreover, these plants are poisonous, so keep them away from children and pets. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Lavender to deep purple
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Rich, loamy, moist, well-drained
  • 11 of 30

    Crocus (Crocus spp.)

    purple crocus

    The Spruce / Adrienne Legault

    Harbingers of spring, crocuses and other bulb plants are welcome flowering visitors to gardens in March and April. Crocuses are small plants with star-shaped blooms that grow close to the ground, reaching just 3 to 6 inches tall depending on the type. Looking like blades of grass, the foliage is marked down the middle with a light stripe. Make sure your crocuses aren't sitting in soggy soil, which can cause them to rot.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Purple, blue, pink, yellow, gold, orange, white
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Well-drained
  • 12 of 30

    Verbena (Verbena spp.)

    tall verbena

    The Spruce / Letícia Almeida

    The Verbena genus includes both annual and perennial species, many of which produce purple flowers. The flowers are tiny and fragrant, creating saucer-shaped clusters that can span 3 inches. The plant itself is airy, ethereal, and tends to sprawl. Although they easily spread, they can be trained to grow in a more compact space with new blooms through regular pruning.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Purple, pink, red, white, orange
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Dry to medium moisture, acidic, well-drained
    Continue to 13 of 30 below.
  • 13 of 30

    Delphinium (Delphinium 'Black Knight')

    Delphinium
    aimintang / Getty Images

    Delphiniums grow as high as 8 feet and are often featured in cottage gardens. The 'Black Knight' cultivar adds a robust burst of dark purple into a garden thanks to its spiked flowers. Delphiniums are relatively short-lived perennials, rarely surviving more than three to four years. The blooms appear in clusters along the stalk in June to July, sometimes reblooming in the fall. Staking is suggested to help them grow well.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 7
    • Color Varieties: Blue, purple, white, pink
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Rich, moist, well-drained
  • 14 of 30

    Purple Ice Plant (Delosperma cooperi)

    Purple ice plant with long thin leaves and deep pink radiating petals with sparkles in sunlight

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    The purple ice plant features flowers with finely textured petals surrounding solid centers. It blooms through most of the summer and fall. The "ice" in this plant's common name comes from the sparkle on its leaves, which is the result of sunlight reflecting off tiny hairs on the leaf surface. This perennial demands soil that drains sharply, so ensure that it's not sitting in soggy soil.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 6 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Purple, pink, red, orange, yellow
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Sandy, dry, well-drained
  • 15 of 30

    Pacific Rhododendron (Rhododendron macrophyllum)

    Pacific rhododendron shrub with pink showy bell-shaped flowers

    Moelyn Photos / Getty Images  

    Pacific rhododendron shrubs can grow quite high. And they produce showy bell-shaped flowers in the spring and summer. Their foliage is evergreen. These shrubs don’t actually need fertile soil to grow well; rather they prefer fairly low-nutrient soil. They are hardy shrubs, but they do like even soil moisture. So you must have a consistent watering schedule. However, good drainage is important because soggy soil can kill them.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Pink, purple
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Acidic, well-drained
  • 16 of 30

    Butterfly Bush (Buddleja davidii)

    Butterfly bush with dark purple flower spike in sunlight

    The Spruce / David Beaulieu

    The butterfly bush is a deciduous shrub with arching branches. It produces brightly colored flower spikes throughout the summer that are highly attractive to butterflies and other pollinators, hence the shrub’s common name. This shrub is quite easy to grow, and because of that it is considered invasive in some areas. So be sure to check for any local restrictions on planting it.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Purple, pink, white, yellow
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, well-drained
    Continue to 17 of 30 below.
  • 17 of 30

    Bougainvillea (Bougainvillea spp.)

    Bougainvillea shrub covering garage front with deep pink flowers on vines

    The Spruce / Leticia Almeida

    Bougainvillea is a genus of tropical vines. These showy plants can act as ground covers if they’re left free to grow. Or they can easily be trained to grow on a support, such as a trellis or fence. The foliage is evergreen. And the large, brightly colored blooms appear seasonally. These vines do have thorns, so care should be taken when working with them.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Purple, red, pink, yellow
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Acidic, well-drained
  • 18 of 30

    Midnight Blue Rose (Rosa 'Midnight Blue')

    Midnight Blue Rose

    阿橋 HQ / Wikimedia Commons / CC BY-SA 2.0 

    The Midnight Blue rose is a beautiful cultivar with deep purple flowers that stretch around 2 to 3 inches across. The blooms are known to have a strong fragrance. These shrubs can flower from spring to fall, and deadheading can help to encourage further blooming. But be careful of the thorns on these shrubs.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 6 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Deep purple
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Loamy, well-drained
  • 19 of 30

    Rhapsody in Blue Rose (Rosa 'Rhapsody in Blue')

    Rhapsody in blue rose plant with vivid purple and ruffled flowers in sunlight closeup

    Nadya So / Getty Images

    The Rhapsody in Blue rose cultivar is another stunning plant with purple flowers. Its blooms, which stretch around 2.5 inches across, appear from late spring all the way until fall. They start out as a vivid purple color and then fade to a mauve-gray. In their centers, they have bright gold stamens. They also feature a strong orange-like fragrance. Deadheading is ideal to promote repeat-blooming.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Purple
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Loamy, well-drained
  • 20 of 30

    Blue Beard (Caryopteris × clandonensis)

    Blue beard plant with small blue-purple flowers on thin stems with yellow-green leaves

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    Blue beard, also known as blue spirea and blue mist, is a small shrub with a mounding growth habit. It only reaches around 2 to 3 feet tall and wide. It features aromatic foliage, and in the late summer the flowers appear. The small, blue-violet flowers are said to look like clouds of blue mist on the plant. This shrub needs sharp soil drainage, as it is particularly intolerant to soggy soil.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Blue-violet
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, well-drained
    Continue to 21 of 30 below.
  • 21 of 30

    Heather (Calluna spp.)

    Heather plant with long stems with small pink flowers and white buds

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    Many species of heather shrubs feature dainty purple flowers along long stems that appear from summer to fall. Heather shrubs look especially striking when planted en masse. And they do particularly well on slopes and in rock gardens. Make sure to give your heather plants consistent moisture, but ensure that the soil has good drainage. Prune them as needed in the early spring before new growth starts. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 6
    • Color Varieties: Purple, pink, white
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Acidic, moist, well-drained
  • 22 of 30

    Winter Heath (Erica spp.)

    Winter heath plant with small clusters of light pink blooms on reddish-orange stems

    The Spruce / David Beaulieu

    Winter heaths are small evergreen shrubs with dense foliage and a mounding growth habit. Like heather, they also look best when planted en masse for maximum impact. Their flowering time depends on location and variety. But often the small clusters of blooms will appear during winter (in mild climates) and in early spring. Prune as needed just after the shrubs are done flowering.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Purple, pink, red, yellow, white
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Acidic, moist, well-drained
  • 23 of 30

    Lilac (Syringa vulgaris)

    Lilac plant with tiny clusters of small light purple flowers on branches

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    Lilac bushes are popular plants with purple flowers. These deciduous shrubs bloom in the mid- to late spring with branching clusters of tiny flowers. The flowers have an exceptionally sweet fragrance. The foliage ranges from blue-green to gray-green. These shrubs are fairly low-maintenance once established. Prune to clean up growth just after flowering is finished. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 7
    • Color Varieties: Lavender-blue, white, burgundy, deep purple, lilac
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Loamy, well-drained
  • 24 of 30

    Hydrangea (Hydrangea spp.)

    Hydrangea plant with light purple and large round flower clusters on edge of stem

    The Spruce / Claire Cohen Bates

    Hydrangeas long have been popular garden plants for their flowers that come in many different colors, including purple. Some varieties have large, round flower clusters while others have smaller, flatter flowers. They generally bloom from mid-summer to fall. Water hydrangeas at least weekly unless you’ve had rainfall, but make sure they’re not sitting in soggy soil. 

    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 9
    • Color Varieties: White, blue, green, red, pink, purple
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Rich, well-drained
    Continue to 25 of 30 below.
  • 25 of 30

    Morning Glory (Ipomoea purpurea)

    Morning glory plant with deep purple trumpet-shaped flowers with pink centers

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    Morning glories are fast-growing annual flowering vines that are a favorite of many gardeners. They’re low-maintenance, and they don’t require pruning or deadheading to look their best. They can grow along the ground or up on a support structure. Their colorful trumpet-shaped flowers appear in the summer and fall. Be sure to water weekly unless you’ve had rainfall.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 2 to 11
    • Color Varieties: Purple, pink, blue, white
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Moist, well-drained
  • 26 of 30

    Wisteria (Wisteria frutescens)

    Wisteria shrub vines with light purple flowers on drooping stems

    The Spruce / Loren Probish

    Wisteria is a woody vine with deep green foliage that can stretch to 30 feet or longer under prime growing conditions. It bears fragrant purple flowers on drooping stems in the spring. Narrow, smooth seed pods follow the flowers. Provide this vine with a sturdy trellis, post, or other support structure to fully enjoy its beautiful growth.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Purple
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Humusy, moist, well-drained
  • 27 of 30

    Lavender (Lavandula spp.)

    Lavender plant with small purple flowers on end of thin stems

    The Spruce / Adrienne Legault

    Lavender is an herb that’s popular not only for its fragrance but also its purple flowers. The tiny clusters of flowers appear in the summertime on upright spikes. The aromatic foliage is a gray-green color. Make sure to situate your lavender plant in a spot that gets full sun and has well-drained soil. In an optimal growing site, the plant needs relatively little care.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Purple
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Well-drained
  • 28 of 30

    Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea)

    Purple coneflower with light pink radiating petals with spiny center cone bloom closeup

    The Spruce / Adrienne Legault

    The purple coneflower is a particularly showy plant. It has an upright growth habit, reaching around 2 to 5 feet high. And in the summer, daisy-like flowers with a spiny center cone bloom. The flowers can stretch up to 5 inches across. The stiff stems also bear dark green foliage. This plant will often self-seed if the spent flower heads are left in place. So if you wish to control its spread, remove the spent blooms.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Purple-pink
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Average, well-drained
    Continue to 29 of 30 below.
  • 29 of 30

    Iris (Iris spp.)

    Iris plant with deep purple flowers with yellow, white and black inner petals

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    Iris flowers feature blooms made of two types of petals. The outer petals droop downward while the smaller inner petals stand upright. This gives the whole flower an interesting shape. Irises bloom starting in the late spring or early summer, often attracting butterflies and hummingbirds. Deadhead spent blooms, and trim back the foliage once frost arrives in the fall.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Purple, blue, white, yellow
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
    • Soil Needs: Rich, well-drained
  • 30 of 30

    Pansy (Viola x wittrockiana)

    Pansy plant with purple and white flowers closeup

    The Spruce / Evgeniya Vlasova

    Pansies are a popular but short-lived garden plant. Outside of their hardiness zones, they’re often grown as annuals. They rarely reach more than a foot in height and spread, but they have large, colorful flowers that bloom in the spring. The flowers are typically fairly flat and stretch roughly 2 to 4 inches across. Make sure to keep the soil around your pansies consistently moist but not soggy for healthy growth.

    • USDA Growing Zones: 6 to 10
    • Color Varieties: Blue, purple, red, pink, yellow, orange, white, bicolors
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Soil Needs: Rich, moist, well-drained