40 Pine Trees From Around the World

pine trees from around the world

Illustration: © The Spruce, 2018

Pines are the shrub and tree species that belong to the genus Pinus. These are evergreen conifers, which have bundles of needles rather than the broad leaves found on deciduous trees. Below, you can discover 40 common species of pine tree, many of which have been planted or migrated well beyond their original native range.

One common way to categorize pine trees is by how many leaves (needles) there are per bundle (fascicle).

  • 01 of 40

    Aleppo Pine (Pinus halepensis)

    Aleppo Pine
    Gunter Flegar/Getty Images

    Aleppo pine is an extremely drought-resistant specimen that is a valuable landscape tree in hot climates, such as that of southern California. The needles are a light yellowish-green. In some parts of the world, it is regarded as an invasive species, since it has a habit of taking over areas burned off by fire.

    Aleppo pine is a very large tree with an irregular shape. It works best on large properties where it has room to grow unimpeded.

    • Latin Name: Pinus halepensis
    • Other Name(s): Jerusalem pine
    • Native to: Mediterranean region
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones:: Zones 8 to 10
    • Size: 30 to 60 feet tall and 20 to 40 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: Usually 2, sometimes 3
  • 02 of 40

    Austrian Pine (Pinus nigra)

    Forest of Black Pines
    Forest of Austrian pine, Maravals, TrŽlissac, Dordogne, France. Laurent LhotŽ / Getty Images

    This medium- to large-sized conifer transforms from a pyramidal shape to a rounded-top specimen when fully mature. It can be used as a specimen tree in the landscape or for screening purposes, but it is susceptible to a variety of pest and disease problems, especially in the Midwest.

    • Latin Name: Pinus nigra
    • Other Name(s): European black pine
    • Native to: Southern Europe, Northern Africa, Cyprus, Turkey
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 4 to 7
    • Size: 40 to 60 feet tall and 20 to 40 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
  • 03 of 40

    Bristlecone Pine (Pinus aristata)

    Bristlecone Pine
    Matt Lavin/flickr/CC By 2.0

    This slow-growing, long-lived tree native to the southern Rocky Mountains makes a great specimen tree in the landscape, where its small size is perfect. It is a dwarfish species that can be used as a shrub or allowed to grow to small tree size.

    • Latin Name: Pinus aristata
    • Other Name(s): Hickory pine, Rocky Mountain bristlecone pine
    • Native to: Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 4 to 7
    • Size: 8 to 30 feet tall and 10 to 15 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 5
  • 04 of 40

    Canary Island Pine (Pinus canariensis)

    Canary Island Pine
    Dominic Dähncke/Getty Images

    This very large tree gradually develops a parasol-like canopy as it matures. It is a very sturdy, durable tree that tolerates most soil types. However, it doesn't tolerate cold. It is not a common landscape tree but is often farmed for its valuable, aromatic lumber.

    • Latin Name: Pinus canariensis
    • Native to: Canary Islands (Spain)
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 9 to 11
    • Size: 50 to 80 feet tall and 30 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 3
    Continue to 5 of 40 below.
  • 05 of 40

    Chir Pine (Pinus roxburghii)

    Chir Pine
    Sunil Garg/flickr/CC By 2.0

    This large pine native to the Himalayas is an important forestry tree in Asia, although the wood is inferior to that of many other pines. It has no meaningful landscape use, but is sometimes planted in the far South for use in construction and furniture making.

    • Latin Name: Pinus roxburghii
    • Other Name(s): Imodi pine
    • Native to: Afghanistan, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal
    • Preferred Hardiness Zone: 9 to 11
    • Size: 60 to 180 feet
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 3
  • 06 of 40

    Coulter Pine (Pinus coulteri)

    Coulter Pine
    J. Maughn/flickr/CC By 2.0

    Coulter pine is a large tree with an irregular crown and very large, heavy cones. Native to the coastal mountains of California and northern Baja California Mexico, it prefers rocky soil at medium altitudes. It is sometimes planted as an ornamental tree in parks and large gardens, but has no commecial use, except as firewood.

    • Latin Name: Pinus coulteri
    • Other Name(s): Big cone pine, nut pine, pitch pine, slash pine
    • Native to: California, Mexico
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 8 to 9
    • Size: 40 to 80 feet tall and 20 to 40 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 3
  • 07 of 40

    Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus)

    Eastern White Pine
    Jim, The Photographer/flickr/CC By 2.0

    This fast-growing, long-lived pine is one of the most important pine species in North America, grown both for timber and for landscape purposes. It is by nature a large tree, but accepts pruning so readily that it can also be kept trained as a hedge shrub.

    • Latin Name: Pinus strobus
    • Other Name(s): White pine
    • Native To: United States, Canada
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 3 to 8
    • Size: 50 to 80 feet tall and 20 to 40 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun to light shade
    • Needles per Bundle: 5
  • 08 of 40

    Foxtail Pine (Pinus blfouriana)

    Foxtail Pine
    Matt Lavin/flickr/CC By 2.0

    This is a somewhat rare pine that is most commonly found at or near the tree line in the Sierra Mountains. It is almost never grown as a landscape tree, but nature lovers find it beautiful when coming across i in natural settings.

    • Latin Name: Pinus balfouriana
    • Native to: California
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 5 to 8
    • Size: 20 to 50 feet tall
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 5
    Continue to 9 of 40 below.
  • 09 of 40

    Gray Pine (Pinus sbiniana)

    Gray Pine
    Don Smith/Getty Images

    Gray pine is a tall pine with an unusual forked trunk. The tree is found in low foothills of the California mountains, but it is rarely planted in landscape applications.

    • Latin Name: Pinus sabiniana
    • Other Name(s): Foothill pine, California foothill pine, bull pine, digger pine
    • Native to: California
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 8 to 9
    • Size: 40 to 70 feet tall
    • Exposure: Full sun to light shade
    • Needles per Bundle: 3
  • 10 of 40

    Italian Stone Pine (Pinus Pinea)

    Italian Stone Pine
    Daniel Schoenen/Getty Images

    Italian stone pine is a classic umbrella-shaped pine from the Mediterranean. It has a very attractive form, but it is rarely grown in U.S. landscapes. It has edible pignoli nuts; in Mediterranean regions, the tree is sometimes planted commercially as a food crop.

    • Latin Name: Pinus pinea
    • Other Name(s): Umbrella pine
    • Native to: Southern Europe, Lebanon, Turkey
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 8 to 10
    • Size: 30 to 60 feet tall and 30 to 50 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
  • 11 of 40

    Jack Pine (Pinus banksiana)

    Grand Lake can be seen through a jack pine tree as the fog lifts off the lake in the early moring hours in Algonquin Park, Ontario.
    Algonquin Park, Ontario, Canada. Robert Postma / Getty Images

    Jack pine is a somewhat scruffy, shabby-looking pine that is rarely used in landscapes, but its tolerance for poor soils can make it a good choice for windbreaks in rural settings.

    • Latin Name: Pinus banksiana
    • Native to: Northern United States, Canada
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 2 to 7
    • Size: 30 to 70 feet tall and 30 to 40 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
  • 12 of 40

    Japanese Black Pine (Pinus thunbergii)

    Japanese Black Pine
    miheco/flickr/CC By 2.0

    Japanese black pine is an attractive, conical-shaped pine that can make a good specimen tree in the landscape. It is also sometimes used in bonsai craft. It is regarded as an invasive plant in Pennsylvania and a few other Atlantic coast states.

    • Latin Name: Pinus thunbergii
    • Other Name(s): Black pine
    • Native to: Japan, South Korea
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 5 to 8
    • Size: 20 to 70 feet tall and 20 to 40 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
    Continue to 13 of 40 below.
  • 13 of 40

    Japanese White Pine (Pinus Parviflora)

    Japanese White Pine
    Incredibly, this Japanese White Pine has been in training since 1625. ( CC BY-SA 2.0) by ragesoss

    Japanese white pine is a medium-sized tree that is a common specimen tree in the landscape. As the tree matures, it develops an attractive spreading branch pattern and flat top. It is also a favorite for bonsai enthusiasts.

    • Latin Name: Pinus parviflora
    • Native to: Japan, South Korea
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 4 to 7
    • Size: 25 to 50 feet tall and wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 5
  • 14 of 40

    Jeffrey Pine (Pinus jeffreyi)

    Olmsted Point
    Olmsted Point, Yosemite National Park. LordRunar / Getty Images

    Jeffrey pine is a very tall but sparse tree that is rarely grown in landscape applications. It has a good tolerance for drought and poor soils. It is regarded as invasive and undesirable in much of California.

    • Latin Name: Pinus jeffreyi
    • Native to: California, Nevada, Oregon, Mexico
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 6 to 8
    • Size: 80 to 140 feet tall and 20 to 30 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 3
    • Note: The bark smells like vanilla
  • 15 of 40

    Lacebark Pine (Pinus bungeana)

    Lacebark Pine
    Cristóbal Alvarado Minic/Getty Images

    This tree has an exfoliating bark that looks similar to that of the sycamore. It grows quite slowly, taking 50 years to reach a mature height of 50 feet. Its attractive bark makes it a favorite landscape specimen.

    • Latin Name: Pinus bungeana
    • Native to: China
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 4 to 8
    • Size: 30 to 50 feet tall and wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 3
  • 16 of 40

    Limber Pine (Pinus flexilis)

    Limber Pine
    Mitch Barrie/flickr/CC By 2.0

    Limber pine is a highly adaptable tree that does well in difficult soils. When planted in landscapes, it is used for challenging conditions, such as where soil is bad.

    • Latin Name: Pinus flexilis
    • Native to: United States, Canada
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 4 to 7
    • Size: 30 to 60 feet tall and 15 to 35 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 5
    Continue to 17 of 40 below.
  • 17 of 40

    Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda)

    Loblolly Pine
    Chris M Morris/flickr/CC By 2.0

    Loblolly pine is naturally found in swampy areas in the Southeast, and its landscape uses are mostly confined to that region, for damp, boggy soil conditions. It has a very straight trunk, and as it ages, the tree loses lower branches so that the crown towers far above the ground.

    • Latin Name: Pinus taeda
    • Other Name(s): Arkansas pine, North Carolina pine, oldfield pine
    • Native to: United States
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 6 to 9
    • Size: 50 to 80 feet + tall and 30 to 40 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 3
  • 18 of 40

    Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta)

    Lodgepole Pine
    S. Rae/flickr/CC By 2.0

    Depending on subspecies and variety, the lodgepole pine is a shrub or tree. As the Latin name contorta hints, the trunks on the tree tend to be twisted and contorted. Rarely used in landcape planting, this pine does have commercial use as a source of construction lumber, poles, pulpwood, and veneers.

    • Latin Name: Pinus contorta subsp.
    • Other Name(s): Beach pine, shore pine, coast pine, Bolander pine, Sierra lodgepole pine, tamarack pine, Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine, black pine
    • Native to: North America
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Depends on variety. Generally 4 to 8
    • Size: 3 to 80 feet tall, depending on subspecies.
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
  • 19 of 40

    Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris)

    Longleaf Pine
    Justin Meissen/flickr/CC By 2.0

    Longleaf pine is a very tall, upright tree with a straight trunk. It has few uses as a landcape tree, but is a valuable commercial tree for lumber and pulpwood. Its needles are 8 to 18 inches long, the source of its common name.

    • Latin Name: Pinus palustris
    • Other Names: Longleaf pine, southern yellow pine, longleaf yellow pine
    • Native to: Southern United States
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zone 7 to 9
    • Size: 60 to 100 feet tall and 30 to 40 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 3
  • 20 of 40

    Luchu Pine (Pinus luchuensis)

    Pinus luchuensis (Okinawa Pine)
    Pinus luchuensis (Okinawa Pine), Chichijima Island, Bonin Islands, Japan. By タクナワン (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

    This large pine with angled branches and a flat crown is a rare tree, originally found only in Okinawa. It can be a good tree for shoreline landscapes.

    • Latin Name: Pinus luchuensis
    • Other Name(s): Okinawa pine, Ryuku Island pine, old style pine
    • Native to: Japan - only found in Okinawa
    • Preferred Hardiness Zone: 9 to 11
    • Size: 50 to 80 feet
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
    Continue to 21 of 40 below.
  • 21 of 40

    Maritime Pine (Pinus pinaster)

    Maritime Pine
    JamesDeMers / Pixabay/CC By 0

    Maritime pine was originally highly prized as a source of timber and resins, but its attractive upswept branches and conical crown make it equally valuable as a landscape specimen.

    • Latin Name: Pinus pinaster
    • Other Name(s): Cluster pine, French turpentine pine
    • Native to: Southern Europe, Morocco
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 8 to 9
    • Size: 60 to 100 feet tall
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2, sometimes 3
  • 22 of 40

    Mexican Weeping Pine (Pinus patula)

    Mexican Weeping Pine
    Daniel Geshev/flickr/CC By 2.0

    This unique-looking pine has drooping tufts of needles that give the tree a droopy, weepy appearance. An important lumber tree in its native Mexico, this tree makes a very unique specimen when planted as a landscape tree.

    • Latin Name: Pinus patula
    • Other Name(s): Jelecote pine, patula pine
    • Native to: Mexico
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 8 to 9
    • Size: 60 to 80 feet tall and 30 to 40 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 3
  • 23 of 40

    Monterey Pine (Pinus radiata)

    Monterey Pine
    David Prasadv/flickr/CC By 2.0

    Monterey pine is a large-bodied tree with a thick trunk and branches. It is a very versatile species, with commercial uses as well as common landscape uses. Native to the foggy coastal areas of California, it has been introduced to New Zealand, where it is now the most prevalent tree for timber.

    • Latin Name: Pinus radiata
    • Other Name(s): Radiata pine
    • Native to: California, Mexico
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 8 to 10
    • Size: 50 to 100 feet tall
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 3 (sometimes 2)
  • 24 of 40

    Mugo Pine (Pinus mugo)

    Mugo Pine
    F.D. Richards/flickr/CC By 2.0

    Mugo pine is a dwarf, creeping shrub or small tree with hard, heavy branches. It makes an interesting shrub specimen in the landscape, or when planted in mass can serve to hold soil and prevent erosion.

    • Latin Name: Pinus mugo
    • Other Name(s): Swiss mountain pine, mugho pine, mountain pine
    • Native to: Europe
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 2 to 7
    • Size: Shrub (3 to 6 feet) or small tree (10 to 18 feet), depending on variety.
    • Exposure: Full sun to light shade
    • Needles per Bundle: 2

    Note: Be sure to read the tag for height information if you are looking for the dwarf kind. Some are 'Compacta', 'Gnome', 'Hesse', var. mugo, and var. pumilo

    Continue to 25 of 40 below.
  • 25 of 40

    Pitch Pine (PInus rigida)

    Pitch Pine
    Cyndy Sims Parr/flickr/CC By. 2.0

    Historically, pitch pine was a major source of pine resins used in everything from Native American canoe-building to railroad ties. Its crooked growth habit and somewhat shabby overall appearance give it little usefulness for timber or for a landscape specimen.

    • Latin Name: Pinus rigida
    • Native to: Eastern U.S, Canada
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 4 to 7
    • Size: 50 to 100 feet tall
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 3
  • 26 of 40

    Pond Pine (Pinus serotina)

    Pinus serotina
    Pinus serotina in the United States Botanic Garden. By James Steakley (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

    Pond pine is a species known to hold its seed cones closed for many years, opening them only after fire has scorched them. Older trees become thin and ragged, but pond pine is increasingly used commercially, for pulp.

    • Latin Name: Pinus serotina
    • Other Name(s): Marsh pine, bay pine, and pocosin pine
    • Native to: Eastern United States
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 7 to 9
    • Size: 30 to 70 feet tall
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 3, sometimes 4
  • 27 of 40

    Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa)

    Ponderosa Pine
    bilge-water/flickr/CC By 2.0

    The immense size and large, straight, thick trunks have made the Ponderosa pine one of the most prized of all species for commercial lumber. It is frequently seen as an ornamental specimen in parks and large landscapes.

    • Latin Name: Pinus ponderosa
    • Other Name(s): Western yellow pine, bull pine, Black Jack, western red pine, western longleaf pine
    • Native to: United States, British Columbia, Canada
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 3 to 7
    • Size: 60 to 100 feet tall and 25 to 30 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 3, sometimes 2
  • 28 of 40

    Red Pine, Norway Pine (Pinus resinosa)

    Red pine
    bobistraveling/flickr/CC By 2.0

    The red pine, also known as the Norway pine, is a tall, straight tree with a conical crown that become rounded with age. It makes a good landscape specimen plant in the northern part of its range, zones 2 to 5.

    • Latin Name: Pinus resinosa
    • Other Name(s): Canadian pine
    • Native to: Northern U.S., Canada
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 2 to 7
    • Size: 50 to 80 feet tall and 30 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
    Continue to 29 of 40 below.
  • 29 of 40

    Sand Pine (Pinus clausa)

    Sand Pine
    Pinus clausa grove in Ocala National Forest, northeastern Florida. By Bill Lea (USDA Forest Service) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

    As the name implies, the sand pine prefers sandy, well-drained soils. It is a medium-sized pine that does well in shady conditions, and some types have with serotinous cones—they require fire before they will open and expel their seeds. Sand pines aren't often used for landscape plantings, but young trees are sometimes farmed as Christmas trees.

    • Latin Name: Pinus clausa
    • Other Name(s): Scrub pine
    • Native to: Alabama, Florida
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 7 to10
    • Size: 15 to 60 feet tall, sometimes up to 100 feet tall
    • Exposure: Full sun to part shade
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
  • 30 of 40

    Scotch Pine (Pinus sylvestris)

    Scotch Pine
    F.D. Richards/flickr/CC By 2.0

    Scotch pine is a fast-growing, medium-sized tree with a conical or column-shaped habit and distinctive flaking brown-red bark. Commercially, it is grown as a Chrstimas tree. Smaller dwarf varieties make good landscape specimen trees.

    • Latin Name: Pinus sylvestris
    • Other Name(s): Scots pine
    • Native to: Europe, Asia
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 2 to 8
    • Size: 30 to 70 feet tall and 25 to 30 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
  • 31 of 40

    Single-Leaf Pinyon Pine (Pinus monophylla)

    Branches and Cone of a One-Leaved Nut Pine
    Eric and David Hosking / Getty Images

    Single-leaf pinyon pine is a small- to medium-sized tree with flaking bark and single needles. In some regions it is used as a Christmas tree, but is rarely used in landscape plantings, since it is difficult to propagate.

    • Latin Name: Pinus monophylla
    • Other Name(s): Pinyon pine
    • Native to: Western United States, Mexico
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 5 to 9
    • Size: 15 to 50 feet tall and 15 to 30 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 1 (only species)
  • 32 of 40

    Sugar Pine (Pinus lambertiana)

    Sugar Pine
    David Prasad/ flickr/CC By 2.0

    Sugar pine​ ​is the tallest of all pine trees with very longest cones—nearly 2 feet in length. It's sheer size makes this tree impractical for landscape use.

    • Latin Name: Pinus lambertiana
    • Other Name(s): Giant pine
    • Native to: California, Nevada, Oregon, Mexico
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 6 to 7
    • Size: 100 to 200 feet tall and 50 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 5
    Continue to 33 of 40 below.
  • 33 of 40

    Tanyosho Pine/Japanese Red Pine (Pinus densiflora 'Umbraculifera')

    Tanyosho pine
    ( CC BY-SA 2.0) by romana klee

    Pinus densiflora is the most common of all pine trees native to Japan, and 'Umbraculifera' is a dwarf variety usually grown as a shrub or small tree. It is often used in foundation plantings, and is sometimes grown by bonsai enthusiasts.

    • Latin Name: Pinus densiflora 'Umbraculifera'
    • Other Name(s): Umbrella pine, tabletop pine
    • Native to: Asia
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 3 to 7
    • Size: 12 to 15 feet tall and up to 20 feet wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
  • 34 of 40

    Tenasserim Pine (Pinus latteri)

    Tenasserim pine is the common name for Pinus latteri.
    Photo: Flickr user yetunminn

    Tenasserim pine is a medium to large-sized tree with orange-red bark. It is closely related to the Aleppo pine. The crown of the tree gradually becomes rounded as the tree ages. It is sometimes planted as a landscape specimen tree in warm climates.

    • Latin Name: Pinus latteri
    • Other names:
    • Native to: Cambodia, China, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 9 to 10
    • Size: 80 to 150 feet tall
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
  • 35 of 40

    Torrey Pine (Pinus torreyanna)

    Torrey Pine
    Mano K/flickr/CC By 2.0

    Torrey pine is a rare species, found only in the coastal sage and chaperral areas of southern California. It has a broad, open-crowned growth habit that becomes twisted in fantastic shapes by coastal winds. Where it appears, the Torrey pine is usually protected by law.

    • Latin Name: Pinus torreyana
    • Other Name(s): Del Mar pine, Soledad pine
    • Native to: Southern California
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 8 to 10
    • Size: About 25 to 60 feet tall and wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 5
  • 36 of 40

    Turkish Pine (Pinus brutia)

    Turkish pine
    Wolfgang Weigelt/flickr/CC By 2.0

    Turkish pine is a very popular ornamental tree for warm climates. Several cultivars are available with remarkable tolerance for heat and drought. It has attractive, deeply fissured red-brown bark.

    • Latin Name: Pinus brutia
    • Other Name(s): Calabrian pine, Brutian pine
    • Native to: Bulgaria, Greece, Italy, Turkey, Ukraine, Western Asia
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 8 to 11
    • Size: 30 to 80 feet tall
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
    Continue to 37 of 40 below.
  • 37 of 40

    Two-Needle Pinyon Pine (PInus edulis)

    Pinus edulis foliage and old pollen cones
    Pinus edulis foliage and old pollen cones, Grand Canyon, Arizona. By Quinn Dombrowski [ CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

    Two-needle pinyon is a small- to medium-sized pine with furrowed and scaly bark. It is considered a two-needle variation of the single-needle pinyon pine, and the pine nuts are edible. It is sometimes planted as a landscape specimen tree, and can be farmed as a Christmas tree.

    • Latin Name: Pinus edulis
    • Other Name(s): Pinyon pine
    • Native to: Western/Central United States, Mexico
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 5 to 8
    • Size: Up to 20 feet tall
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2 to 3
  • 38 of 40

    Virginia Pine (Pinus virginiana)

    Virginia Pine
    Derek Ramsey/Wikimedia Commons/CC By 2.0

    This tree is a small to medium-sized specimen that is a good choice for providing winter accent in the landscape. Some cultivars turn a very attractive yellow-gold in winter. It is often farmed for Christmas trees.

    • Latin Name: Pinus virginiana
    • Other Name(s): Scrub pine
    • Native to: Eastern United States
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 5 to 8
    • Size: About 10 to 50 feet tall and wide
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 2
  • 39 of 40

    Western White Pine (Pinus monticola)

    Western White Pine
    Eyeclick/Getty Images

    Western white pine is related to the eastern white pine, and is one of the largest of the pines, occasionally reaching 200 feet. It is too large to be commonly used in landscaping, but in its native habitat (the northern states of the Pacific Northwest) it can be found all the way from mountain elevations down to sea level.

    • Latin Name: Pinus monticola
    • Other Name(s): Mountain white pine, Idaho white pine, silver pine
    • Native to: Western United States, Canada
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 5 to 7
    • Size: 60 to 150 feet + tall
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 5
  • 40 of 40

    Whitebark Pine (Pinus albicaulis)

    Whitebark Pine trees
    daveynin/flickr/CC By 2.0

    Whitebark pine is closely related to the limber pine, and like that tree, the whitebark thrives at high elevations near the treeline in mountainous regions of the western Rockies and Sierras. It is a somewhat scrubby tree and is rarely used in landscape plantings. This tree is a threatened species in its native range.

    • Latin Name: Pinus albicaulis
    • Other Name(s): Alpine whitebark pine, pitch pine, scrub pine, creeping pine
    • Native to: Western United States, Canada
    • Preferred Hardiness Zones: Zones 4 to 8
    • Size: 20 to 60 feet tall
    • Exposure: Full sun
    • Needles per Bundle: 5