How to Remove Curry Stains from Clothes Carpets and Upholstery

curry
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The complex combination of spices in curry is what gives the dish its wonderful, exotic flavor. Unfortunately it is those spices that can permanently stain and even dye fabrics if the curry stain is not removed quickly. Learn how to save your clothing, carpet and upholstery from curry spills.

How to Remove Curry Stains from Washable Clothes

You are going to have the best luck at removing the stain if you treat it as soon as possible.

Begin by using a dull knife edge, spoon or even the edge of a credit card to lift away any curry solids from the fabric. If you wipe at the stain with a cloth or sponge, you may drive the stain deeper into the fabric fibers. This makes it even more difficult to remove.

If the curry stain is on a colored garment that is dye fast (figure that out here), mix a solution of drug-store regular strength (20% volume) hydrogen peroxide and water. The solution should be very weak - one tablespoon hydrogen peroxide to one-half cup water. Hydrogen peroxide is a bleaching agent and should not be used at full strength on colored fabrics.

Mix the hydrogen peroxide/water solution in a shallow glass contain. Place the stained area in the solution and soak the stain in the solution for at least two hours. Rinse the stained area in cool, clean water and then wash the entire garment as directed on the clothing label using your regular detergent and the hottest water recommended for the fabric.

If the stain remains, mix a solution of oxygen-based bleach (brand names are: OxiCleanNellie's All Natural Oxygen Brightener, or OXO Brite) and warm water following package directions. Submerge the entire garment and allow it to soak overnight. If the stain is still visible, repeat this soaking step with a fresh solution.

If no stain remains, launder as usual.

Always check the stained area before placing the garment in the dryer. The high heat from the dryer can permanently set the stain.

How to Remove Curry Stains from Dry Clean Only Fabrics

Remove any curry solids with the edge of a dull knife or spoon. Do not rub with a cloth or sponge.

Mix one tablespoon borax powder with one pint (two cups) of lukewarm water. Use a sponge to apply the borax solution to the stain. Do not saturate the stain, simply sponge on solution and blot away the curry with a white absorbent cloth or paper towel as it is loosens. When the stain lifts, sponge the area with cool, clean water and allow to dry away from direct heat. If stain remains, take garment to a professional dry cleaner and identify the stain.

How to Remove Curry Stains from Carpet and Upholstery

When a blob of curry hits the carpet, use that dull knife or spoon to lift away all the solids you can. Take care not to spread the stain by rubbing. Start by mixing a solution of one tablespoon dish washing liquid, two cups of cool water and one tablespoon of white distilled vinegar OR household ammonia. Stir to mix well.

Use a clean white cloth or paper towel and sponge the stain with the solution.

Allow this mixture to sit for five minutes and then blot away with a dry cloth. Repeat until no more color is transferred to the white cloth.

Next, dip another clean white cloth in plain water and blot the stain to rinse away any soapy residue. Move to a dry cloth and blot until all moisture is absorbed. Allow the carpet to air dry away from direct heat.

If any stain remains, mix a solution of  all-fabric oxygen bleach and warm water (OxiCleanNellie's All Natural Oxygen Brightener, or OXO Brite are brand names) following the package label directions. Blot the area with the solution and allow the solution to stay on the solution for at least thirty minutes - one hour is better. Blot with dry white cloth and allow to air dry.

Vacuum carpet to lift fibers.

The same treatments can be used on most upholstery fabrics.

Just take extra care not to over wet the fabric. If the upholstery is silk, wool or vintage, consult a professional cleaner.

For more stain removal tips: Read Stain Removal A to Z