Rosecose Luxurious Goose Down Comforter Review

This hotel-esque comforter will transform your bed

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4.9

Rosecose Luxurious Goose Down Comforter

Rosecose Luxurious Goose Down Comforter

The Spruce / Meredith Hurd

What We Like

  • 100-percent goose down

  • Lightweight and breathable

  • Hypo-allergenic

  • Luxe piping

What We Don't Like

  • Dry clean only

Bottom Line

If you’re looking to invest in a quality down comforter, the Rosecose Luxurious Goose Down Comforter offers unparalleled softness for a great price.   

4.9

Rosecose Luxurious Goose Down Comforter

Rosecose Luxurious Goose Down Comforter

The Spruce / Meredith Hurd

The average person spends about one-third of their life sleeping, so it’s no wonder that we all go to Goldilocks lengths to ensure our bedding is just right. There’s nothing more satisfying than sinking into a cloud-like puff for eight (if we’re lucky) hours of deep, restorative sleep. So what’s the coziest, fluffiest kind of comforter one can buy? Down.

Down comforters are made from down feathers—one of the lightest, warmest, and most efficient insulators. The fluffy, yet breathable construction makes them a great choice for all seasons, too. Due to their high-quality construction, down comforters can be costly, though. To ensure Rosecose’s Luxurious Goose Down Comforter was worth the price, we picked one up and tested it out for weeks on end. Read on to find out if it’s a worthy investment. 

Rosecose Luxurious Goose Down Comforter
The Spruce / Meredith Hurd

Design: Hotel-level luxury 

At first glance, Rosecose’s Luxurious Goose Down Comforter is, well, luxurious. Once out of its packaging and given the time to reach peak fluffiness, the comforter looks as good as it feels. The Rosecose is constructed from perfectly crisp white cotton and silver piping along the edges adds to the hotel-esque feel.

At 90 x 90 inches, we found the Queen-size comforter to be a good size, leaving roughly 12 inches to hang off the sides of the bed.

This comforter features what’s called a “baffle box” design. Baffle box is a box pattern that’s achieved by sewing strips of fabric—called “baffles”—between the top and bottom layers to create compartments that offer heightened expansion for the down. The 12-inch baffle box design is not only attractive, but also very successful at distributing the down evenly so you don’t experience any lumps or bumps. 

At 90 x 90 inches, we found the Queen-size comforter to be a good size, leaving roughly 12 inches to hang off the sides of the bed. The design also features ties at each corner to secure a duvet cover. We would definitely suggest purchasing a duvet cover to protect the integrity of the down and extend the life of the comforter. 

Rosecose Luxurious Goose Down Comforter
The Spruce / Meredith Hurd 

Material: Cloud-like down  

The Rosecose comforter features a 100-percent cotton shell and 1200 thread count. Inside, there’s a medium-weight, 42-ounce fill made from 100-percent goose down with a fill power of 750+. Fill power measures the loft, AKA fluffiness, of the down and ranges from about 300 to 900—so the Rosecose is pretty luxe.

The 12-inch baffle box design is not only attractive, but also very successful at distributing the down evenly so you don’t experience any lumps or bumps.

Straight out of the bag, you’ll notice the comforter is a bit deflated and smells a little plastic-y from the vacuum-sealed packaging. That said, the smell dissipates in less than an hour and with ample time (up to 72 hours total), the comforter will puff up. To speed up the process, we threw ours in a dryer, set it to “air fluff,” and let the comforter tumble for 5 to 10 minutes. That definitely helped, but we still noticed it looked a lot loftier the following day. 

Another great aspect of Rosecose’s material is that it’s hypo-allergenic. Allergy sufferers tend to avoid feather-filled bedding and opt for synthetic down, so this is a very welcome departure from typical down. Additionally, the comforter enjoys a mid-weight design that’s suited to all-season use, so you don’t have to worry about swapping it out in summer or winter. 

Rosecose Luxurious Goose Down Comforter
The Spruce / Meredith Hurd

Washing: Dry clean…only?

Aside from the occasional spot treatment, it’s recommended that you clean your down comforter just two to three times a year. While the Rosecose comforter’s packaging says “dry clean only,” we did some additional digging and discovered that the harsh chemicals used at the dry cleaner can actually have an adverse effect on natural down. So what is one to do?

The good news is you can totally wash your down comforter like normal. It’s suggested that you seek out a commercial-size washer (most laundromats have them), but we decided to take our chances and see how it would hold up to an at-home wash. We washed ours with cold water—as hot water can shrink the fabric up to 8 percent—and used a gentle soap. We purposely avoided fabric softener as that can coat the down and reduce its fluff. We then put it in the dryer on low heat with a few dryer sheets and some tennis balls to speed up drying time. It came out impressively clean and fluffed back up to its original shape. 

Warning

Do not line-dry your comforter. This can cause the down to clump. 

Price: Mid-range and worth it 

Investing in a down comforter requires some consideration—bed size, climate, fill power, thread count, allergies. Each of these factors can influence the price of your comforter and even at their most basic, natural down comforters don’t come cheap. At about $120 for a Queen-size comforter, the Rosecose is wonderfully priced—especially considering its down quality and 100-percent cotton shell. 

Rosecose Luxurious Goose Down Comforter vs. The Company Store Alberta Euro Down Comforter 

The Company Store’s Alberta Euro Down Comforter gives the Rosecose a run for its money. There are a few difference between the two, of course; some which lean in favor of the Alberta and some which give Rosecose the edge. The first is made with natural duck down fill and cased in a sateen shell, as opposed to the latter’s goose down fill and 100-percent cotton shell. While duck down is smaller and less loftier than goose down, the Alberta does have the upperhand when it comes to care. While the Rosecose is dry clean only, the Alberta is machine washable. While it is more expensive than the Rosecose—a Queen-size medium-warmth comforter will run you $400 as opposed to $120—it is far more customizable. With the Alberta Euro, you can chooe from Twin, Full, Queen, and King sizes; light, medium, or extra warmth; and white, platinum, ivory, cloud blue, or alabaster color.

Final Verdict

Treat yourself. 

If you haven’t experienced the luxury of a goose down comforter (or if you have at a hotel but not at home), please get yourself the Rosecose stat. Sleeping with this comforter is literally like snuggling a cloud, and who wouldn’t want that?  

Specs

  • Product Name Luxurious Goose Down Comforter
  • Product Brand Rosecose
  • Price $119.00
  • Weight 6.83 lbs.
  • Product Dimensions 17.4 x 15.4 x 4 in.
  • Material 100-percent cotton shell; 100-percent goose down fill
  • Size Options Twin (68 x 90 in), Queen (90 x 90 in), King (106 x 90 in)