Samsung DVE60M9900V FlexDry Dryer Review

A true workhorse—if you’re willing to pay

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5

Samsung DVE60M9900V FlexDry Dryer

Samsung DVE60M9900V FlexDry Dryer

The Spruce / Nathan Borchelt 

What We Like

  • Super efficient

  • Presets are accurate and well thought out

  • Handles delicate pieces well

  • Near-silent operation

  • Drum dryer and FlexDry can run simultaneously 

What We Don't Like

  • Pricy

  • Problems with Wi-Fi connectivity

  • Taller than most dryers—requires more vertical clearance

Bottom Line

Samsung’s DVE60M9900V FlexDry Dryer delivers an array of presets and controls that will efficiently dry every piece of laundry you throw at it. It comes at a steep price, though—nearly $1,000 more than some of the market’s leading electrical dryers.

5

Samsung DVE60M9900V FlexDry Dryer

Samsung DVE60M9900V FlexDry Dryer

The Spruce / Nathan Borchelt 

The modern-day dryer—once a relatively straightforward appliance—has grown into quite an impressive piece of technology, and Samsung’s FlexDry Dryer may be the best example of that evolution. An array of buttons look like the control panel of a spaceship, and preset configurations for both the main 7.5-cubic-foot dryer tub as well as the FlexDry compartment— which is calibrated to delicately dry fragile garments—render this dryer far from basic. With a suggested retail price of $2,000, there are certainly less-expensive dryers on the market, but after weeks of rigorous testing, we can attest to the fact that you get what you pay for. Read on for everything we discovered in terms of the dryer’s setup, performance, design, and competition. 

Samsung DVE60M9900V FlexDry Dryer
The Spruce Pets / Nathan Borchelt

Setup Process: Pretty typical—until you try to sync it to your home network

As is typically the case with most major appliances, delivery and installation were included in the Samsung’s purchase price. Delivery guys unboxed the unit on their truck, maneuvered it down narrow basement stairs, and set up it up in our laundry room—between our water heater and utility sink—in less than 20 minutes.  

Once the dryer was installed and the delivery guys took off, it was time to sync the appliance to our Wi-Fi. This proved to be a bit of a chore as we had to create a Samsung account (you can log into an existing one if you have it) and the interface was awkward with unreliable, Captcha-style security protocols. Once we got the app installed and our account set up, however, syncing to the dryer proved to be simple. All we had to do was depress the Smart Control buttons to put the dryers into pairing mode, add the devices through the app (look for “FlexDry”), and after a few more steps, we were up and running.

Delivery guys unboxed the unit on their truck, maneuvered it down narrow basement stairs, and set up it up in our laundry room...in less than 20 minutes.

Or so we thought, anyways. After the above steps, we could monitor the status of both dryers—and received push notifications like “door open”—but whenever we attempted to set up the full remote controls, the app insisted it couldn’t find our router. At first, we thought maybe the router was too far away, but even when we moved it and were standing right next to it, the app couldn’t locate it, and the router is the most powerful offered by our internet provider. 

After several attempts—toggling all the network devices on and off and reconnecting to the dryer several times only to face the same “not able to connect to your router” error messages— we gave up. Based on reviews, other users seemed to encounter the same issue. Perhaps a future app update will remedy this issue? But overall, this was just a minor strike against the appliance for us. If you envision piloting your dryer from the couch, though, you may have to put in a lot more time into getting it up and running. 

Before you purchase the dryer, just be sure to measure your residence’s points of access (height and width) to assure it’ll fit, and secure a new 240-volt three-prong electrical cord so everything is ready to go for installation.

Samsung DVE60M9900V FlexDry Dryer
The Spruce Pets / Nathan Borchelt

Performance: Nothing this dryer can’t handle 

Prior to testing the Samsung, my wife and I moved from a cramped one-bedroom condo to a three-story row house and in the process, amassed an absolute mountain of dirty laundry. We had sweaty clothes from packing, paint-flecked outfits from renovations, and the normal dirty clothes of everyday life. On top of that, we had piles upon piles of spent towels, sheets, blankets, and quilts that we used as padding when packing our more fragile items. All told, we did five loads of laundry in quick succession the day after the unit was installed. We toyed around with a variety of presets—on both the main drum as well as the FlexDry unit—and the Samsung performed admirably.

Other than the first time we tried to start the machine—which requires that you hold the START button a few beats—we found the controls and display panels to be quite intuitive, with clear time displays as well as a Status Bar that ticks through the various dryer stages. 

When drying most of our day-to-day clothes, we simply used the tumble dryer on the Normal setting, which defaults to one hour and 15 minutes at medium heat. Thanks to Sensor Dry technology, though, the Samsung is able to modify drying times based on the moisture of your clothes. The dryer also employs its Eco Dry setting by default, which uses up to 25 percent less energy per load. 

As for jeans and long-sleeved work shirts which were subjected to days of house repairs, we ran those on the Heavy Duty setting—a treatment that targets hefty fabrics like denim and corduroy by blasting the clothes with high heat. Towels and bedding got their respective settings as well, while our running gear was dried on the Active Wear setting, which targets harder-to-dry spots like waistbands and Velcro.  

We toyed around with a variety of presets—on both the main drum as well as the FlexDry unit—and the Samsung performed admirably.

In an effort to test out some of the more unique settings, we gambled the fate of several perfectly-fitting t-shirts, skirts, and button-downs on the Delicate setting within the main drum, which uses a low temperature. Thankfully, everything came out as it went in. This performance-oriented feature is supplemented by a handful of other sartorially-minded settings like Wrinkle Prevent, dry level controls (which will dry clothes only as much as you desire), and a mixed-load bell that sounds when the average dry level reaches 80 percent, so you can rescue a few items from the drum that you want to finish drying outside the dryer.  

Naturally, you can go full manual, setting the time on your own and selecting the temperature, choosing from high, medium, medium low, low, and extra low. But we found the preset controls to be an accurate and convenient starting point, and seldom had to stray from them. The manual also offers a smart cheat sheet on the best ways to dry less-conventional items like cloth diapers, stuffed toys, curtains, pillows, and plastics like outdoor furniture covers. We tried the latter setting to shake the water off a newly washed shower curtain, and using the Air Fluff setting, it took about 45 minutes.

Then, there’s the FlexDry system—a separate, top-loading dryer that sits atop the tumble dryer—designed to handle items that would usually get destroyed in the drum. The cycles here are super specific, with options for Shirts/Blouses, Undergarments, Sweaters, and Accessories (scarves, gloves, stockings, and the like). The rectangular drying space is about 5 inches deep, and measures 19 x 21 inches. An (optional) flexible rack, which sits on four supports, lets you dry in layers by creating a gap of air between your apparel. 

Everything we dried in the FlexDry came out dry and wrinkle-free; in part because we followed the guidelines for how to layer and fold the apparel as outlined in the manual. While the drying time was far faster than air-drying on a rack, dry times still range from 40 to 55 minutes (which is a long time to dry a handful of items), so in most scenarios, we think we’d air dry to save energy.    

Samsung DVE60M9900V FlexDry Dryer
The Spruce Pets / Nathan Borchelt

Design: Futuristic and fingerprint-free

Samsung’s FlexDry Dryer comes in both white and fingerprint-resistant black, the latter which definitely reinforces its overall space-age look and feel. The buttons run in even lines across flat panels at the top of the tumble dryer and below the FlexDry section, both with easy-to-ready blue LED display lights.

Thus far, the “fingerprint-free” claim has proven accurate.

The FlexDry feature does add some height to the overall unit, which tops out at 46.9 inches. Most 7.5-cubic-foot dryers measure about 40 inches tall, so be sure you have the necessary clearance for the unit. Also keep in mind that the FlexDry’s door opens upwards, so allow for an additional 1.5 feet above the dryer. 

Thus far, the “fingerprint-free” claim has proven accurate. When an overzealous washing of paint brushes in the adjacent utility sink gave the side of the dryer a spray of watered-down ceiling paint, a soft, slightly wet cloth cleaned up the mess in no time.

Samsung DVE60M9900V FlexDry Dryer
The Spruce Pets / Nathan Borchelt

Price: It’s certainly up there

Samsung’s FlexDry Dryer retails for roughly $2,000—a whopping $1,000 more than most leading electrical dryers. While there are less expensive appliances with the same capacity, the DVE60M9900V’s FlexDry option allows for more versatility when it comes to drying delicate apparel. If you own a lot of cashmere sweaters, silk blouses, or other equally fragile garments, it’s worth the investment. Just beware that you may have to call in an expert to get the Wi-Fi integration to work if the app can’t find your router.  

Competition: Cheaper options, but all sans FlexDry

LG Electronics Smart Gas Dryer: If you’ve got a gas connection and a serious desire for reliable Wi-Fi controls, LG’s Smart Gas Dryer could be a perfect fit. It’s slightly smaller than the Samsung FlexDry at 7.3 cubic feet, but users report reliable remote/app control functionality and steam technology helps reduce wrinkles. Like the FlexDry, the LG also has a sleek silhouette and Sensor Dry System so it automatically adjusts drying times based on moisture levels. Best of all? It’ll run you just half the cost of the Samsung at $1,000. 

Whirlpool WED4950HW 14-Cycle Electric Dryer: If you couldn’t care less about Wi-Fi connectivity, Whirlpool’s WED4950HW is a great option. You get six cubic inches less drying capacity and no FlexDry functionality, but a price point—just under $600—that’s far more approachable. The Whirlpool comes with its own smart features like auto-dry sensors and Wrinkle Shield. It also comes equipped with an extra-wide drop-down door for easier loading and unloading. No, it doesn’t have Wi-Fi connectivity, but it will get the job done for much, much less. 

Final Verdict

If money is no object and you don’t care about Wi-Fi connectivity, go for it. 

If your wardrobe is heavy on delicate garments that require tedious care and air drying, the Samsung DVE60M9900V FlexDry will prove invaluable. Of course, the dryer’s main drum does it all, too, with smart features that stop cycles early the load is sufficiently dry and settings for everything from athletic apparel to plastic items like shower curtains. If Wi-Fi connectivity is high on your list of priorities, this may not be the best option, though.

Specs

  • Product Name FlexDry Dryer
  • Product Brand Samsung
  • SKU 1002406543
  • Price $1999.00
  • Weight 167 lbs.
  • Product Dimensions 27 x 32.5 x 46.9 in.
  • Color Fingerprint-resistant black stainless and white
  • Capacity 7.5 cu ft
  • Voltage 220 V
  • Heating Source Electric
  • Warranty 1-year parts and labor, 1-year control board