Single Crochet Spike Stitch Tutorial With Photos

Related Resources: Single Crochet Stitch Variations | Crochet Stitches | Free Crochet Tutorials

This easy crochet stitch goes by several names:

  • Single crochet spike stitch, or sometimes just spike stitch. Note that there are many different possible variations of the spike stitch. I find it easiest to work spike stitches using the single crochet, but you could also work spike stitches using half double crochet, double crochet, treble crochet, or other stitches.
  • Long single crochet stitch
  • Elongated...MORE single crochet stitch

This stitch is crocheted, but it sort of resembles the embroidered blanket stitch. If you'd like to do a crocheted version of the blanket stitch instead of embroidering it, this stitch is one possible substitute.

Do not confuse this stitch with the extended single crochet, which is a different stitch.

Important Note! You can click on any of the photos in this tutorial to see enlargements.

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    Instructions for How to Do the Single Crochet Spike Stitch

    Crochet Spike Stitches
    Crochet Spike Stitches. In the Green Yarn, 3 SC Stitches Are Followed by a Spike Stitch, Then the Pattern Repeats.

    In the photo at left, the stitches worked in tan yarn are all single crochet stitches. I ended off the tan yarn and I've changed colors so that I am now working in green yarn. I've been working the edging of Erica Jackofsky's pattern for Timber Lily fingerless gloves. The basic pattern repeat is 3 single crochet stitches followed by a spike stitch / long single crochet stitch / elongated single crochet stitch.

    So at this point in my work, I've worked my three single crochet...MORE stitches and I am preparing to follow them up with a spike stitch, which I will demonstrate in the steps below.

    Once you understand how to crochet a spike stitch, there are many possible patterns you could work with them.

    By the way, I'm assuming you already know how to do single crochet stitch. But if you don't, make sure to check out this single crochet tutorial.

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    Crochet Spike Stitches Alternating With Multiple Single Crochet Stitches
    Crochet Spike Stitches Alternating With Multiple Single Crochet Stitches. See That Black Arrow? That's Where I'm About to Work My Next Spike Stitch. Photo © Michael Solovay

    If you were going to work an ordinary single crochet stitch, you'd work it into the two loops of the next stitch. But you're not going to do that. Instead, you're going to work into the corresponding stitch in the row below the next stitch.

    Don't worry if your corresponding stitch isn't directlybelow the stitch you'd ordinarily be working into. It might be a little to one side; that's normal.

    Also, be aware that you could work a spike stitch into lower rows than that if...MORE you like. You could work a stitch into the corresponding stitch two rows down, or even three or four rows down, if you want to. The further down the work you make the stitch, the longer your stitch will be.

    My own preference is to keep my spike stitches shorter, because I worry that long spikes could get snagged on things and start looking icky as time passes. It's not a bad idea to be cautious about using lots of long spikes on projects that will be subjected to a major abuse. I wouldn't use lots of really deep spike stitches on, say, kids' clothes, but they'd be gorgeous on throw pillows for the guest bedroom. I do see plenty of interesting crochet patterns around utilizing spike stitches that are three and four rows deep, and many of them are lovely.

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    Crochet Spike Stitch in Progress
    Crochet Spike Stitch in Progress. Crochet Spike Stitch in Progress -- Photo © Michael Solovay

    Here the upper photo shows me with my crochet hook poised and getting ready to work the next spike stitch.

    In the lower photo, I've inserted my hook into the stitch.

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    Grab the Yarn With the Crochet Hook
    Grab the Yarn With the Crochet Hook. Grab the Yarn With the Crochet Hook. Photo © Michael Solovay

    The next step: grab the yarn with the crochet hook...

    Continue to 5 of 12 below.
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    Pull Yarn Through Stitch, Bringing It Up to the Same Height as the Single Crochet Stitches.
    Pull the Yarn Through the Stitch, Bringing It Up to the Same Height as the Single Crochet Stitches. Pull the Yarn Through the Stitch, Bringing It Up to the Same Height as the Single Crochet Stitches.

    and pull it through the stitch. Make sure to bring it all the way up to the height of the other stitches you've already crocheted.

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    Crochet Spike Stitch in Progress
    Crochet Spike Stitch in Progress. Crochet Spike Stitch in Progress -- Photo © Michael Solovay

    Wrap the yarn around the crochet hook again...

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    Pull the Yarn Through Both Loops on Hook.
    Pull the Yarn Through Both Loops on Hook. Pull the Yarn Through Both Loops on Hook. Photo © Michael Solovay

    and pull it through both active loops on the crochet hook.

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    Finished Crochet Spike Stitch
    Finished Crochet Spike Stitch. Finished Crochet Spike Stitch -- Photo © Michael Solovay

    Here's how the completed spike stitch looks. (Remember, you can click any of these photos to see a larger version.)

    Continue to 9 of 12 below.
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    Crochet Spike Stitches Alternated With Groups of Three Single Crochet Stitches
    Crochet Spike Stitches Alternated With Groups of Three Single Crochet Stitches. Crochet Spike Stitches Alternated With Groups of 3 Single Crochet Stitches. Photo © Michael Solovay

    Here's another look at this stitch pattern. It makes a really nice edging; I enjoy using this for afghan borders. However, it doesn't have to be worked as a a trim or an edging; you could go back and work more rows of crochet on top of this. There are many interesting possibilities for things you can do with it.

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    Free Crochet Patterns Made Using the Long Single Crochet Stitch

    Want to try crocheting some projects using this stitch? Here are links to some free crochet patterns featuring the spike stitch.

    • Timber Lily Fingerless Mitts -- These fingerless mitts are crocheted in two colors. They'll keep your hands warm and comfortable. At the same time, your fingers will retain their mobility for typing, turning pages, pressing buttons, or whatever else you might need to do.
    • Winter Snowflake Applique -- This snowflake uses the spike stitch in a slightly different way....MORE Since it's a snowflake, it's crocheted in rounds rather than rows, but the basic method of working the spike stitch is the same; it's a single crochet stitch that's longer than usual because it's worked into the round below the round you'd usually work into.
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    Learn More About Crocheting Spike Stitches

    Staggered Spike Stitch Stripes
    Staggered Spike Stitch Stripes. Staggered Spike Stitch Stripes -- Photo © Amy Solovay

    Want to see more free tutorials and patterns for utilizing spike stitches? If so, check out our page about spike stitch. Pictured at left: staggered spike stitch stripes. The instructions for this stitch, and others, are available for free on our website.

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    More From Our Crochet Designers

    Free Crochet Patterns for All of These Designs Are Available Here at Crochet.About.com.
    Free Crochet Patterns for All of These Designs Are Available Here at Crochet.About.com. Flowers | Blankets | Easy Baby Blanket - Photos © Michael and Amy Solovay

    More From Amy Solovay

    More From Erica Jackofsky

    • Free crochet patterns by Erica Jackofsky
    • Fiddle knits designs -- Erica's website featuring her latest knitting patterns and more.

    Reference:


    The Harmony Guide to Crochet Stitches, Volume One
    Compiled by James Walters and Sylvia Cosh
    ISBN# 0-7111-0028-4