Spicy Guacamole (Sriracha-mole)

Spicy guacamole
DebbiSmirnoff/Getty Images
  • 20 mins
  • Prep: 20 mins,
  • Cook: 0 mins
  • Yield: Serves 4
Ratings

This is guacamole, with a nice hit of Sriracha sauce, which my kids LOVE, and use on pretty much anything they want to add a bit of spice to.

What You'll Need

  • 2 ripe California avocados
  • 1/3 cup red onion (minced)
  • 8 cherry or grape tomatoes (roughly chopped, about 1/2 cup)
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • ½ to 1 teaspoon Sriracha sauce (or to taste)
  • 1 bag of tortilla chips to serve

How to Make It

  1. Cut the avocados in half, remove the pits, and use a knife to cut the avocado into chunks right in the skin, cutting one way then crosswise in a grid like fashion.  Use a spoon to scoop out all of the flesh into a medium-sized bowl.  
  2. Add the onion, tomato, and salt and pepper and use a fork or a potato masher (this is great fun for kids) to combine the ingredients and mush up the avocado, leaving it as chunky or as blended as you like.  Stir in the lemon juice and Sriracha, then taste and correct the seasonings.


    Also check out 3 Great Dips to Start the Evening Off Right and 3 Dips from the Best Dips and Apps Ever. Dips are always a simple, fun dish to have when entertaining that everyone can share!

    According to California Avocado:

    "There's more to fresh California Avocados than great taste. Learning about avocado nutrition facts can help inspire you to find more ways to incorporate this premium fruit into your healthful diet.

    The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 recommends that Americans increase their intake of dietary fiber and states that dietary fiber that occurs naturally in foods may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, as well as help provide a feeling of fullness and promote healthy laxation. One-fifth of a medium California avocado (1 ounce) provides 8% of the Daily Value for fiber, while enjoying one-half of a medium California avocado provides 20% of the Daily Value for fiber.

    Avocados can act as a “nutrient booster” by enabling the body to absorb more fat-soluble nutrients, such as vitamins A, D, E, and K, in foods that are eaten with the fruit.

    According to the American Heart Association, mono and polyunsaturated fats, when consumed in moderation and eaten in place of saturated or trans fats, can help reduce blood cholesterol levels and decrease risk for heart disease. Avocados are one of the few fruits (yes, they are really a fruit) that provide “good” fats (0.5 g Poly and 3 g Mono per 1-oz. serving). According to David Heber, M.D., director of the Center for Human Nutrition at the University of California, Los Angeles, “Increasing your intake of fruits and vegetables can reduce heart disease by providing heart healthy nutrients and phytonutrients such as the monounsaturated fat and lutein in avocados.

    Compared to other commonly eaten fruits, California Avocados rank highest in lutein, which acts as an antioxidant and betasitosterol, which may block cholesterol absorption.”

    Over 75% of the fat in avocados is unsaturated (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats), making them a great substitute for foods high in saturated fat. When used in place of other fats avocados can be part of the DASH eating plan, which may help you control your blood pressure, and the creamy texture of the fruit helps make dishes satisfyingly delicious."