Seven of the Top Chinese Soup Recipes

Chinese Wonton Soup Noodles
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In this article you will learn how to make popular soups from Chinese cuisine, such as Wonton soup and Hot and Sour Soup at home.

1. Hot and Sour Soup

Unlike other Sichuan dishes, this classic soup gets its heat from white pepper. There are many versions of hot and sour soup and most of which contain wood ear, tofu, carrot and pork. This version of this popular soup uses red rice vinegar which is available at Chinese/Asian markets.

I personally like to use black vinegar in this soup. If you like your hot and sour soup quite sour, then add vinegar right at the end and cook for less time.

2. Wonton Soup

A popular Chinese restaurant dish, the name wonton means swallowing a cloud, and the wontons floating in this popular soup are thought to resemble clouds. You can check out the article “Authentic Chinese Fried Wonton Recipe” for more information and for the history of wontons.

You can find out how to make wonton wrappers in this article “ Chinese Wonton Wrapper Recipes”.

3. Egg Drop Soup

Here is another dish you’ll find on many Chinese restaurant and takeaway menus. This contains beaten eggs that are streamed into a seasoned broth. The basic recipe is quite simple; I’ve included a few suggestions for ingredients you can add.

4. Cream Corn Soup (With Crabmeat)

Traditionally, this warming Cantonese soup is prepared in the same way as “Chicken Velvet” by chopping the meat or seafood into small pieces and mixing it with egg whites, liquid and cornstarch.

This recipe for Cream Corn Soup is much simpler - the cornstarch and water mixture is used as a thickener, and the egg whites are streamed into hot broth before serving, just like in Egg Drop Soup.

If you are not a fan of crabmeat, you can replace with ham or chicken.

5. Winter Melon Soup

This popular dish features the mild sweet taste of winter melon, available at Chinese/ Asian market.

Normally in the East, Chinese and Taiwanese households make this soup with pork ribs and pork broth. But you can use chicken broth as well.

6. West Lake Beef Soup

Marinated ground beef in a seasoned broth, with egg whites streamed in at the end, garnished with green onions or coriander.

7. Watercress Soup

There are many ways to make watercress soup, some recipes add a small amount of marinated beef or pork, while a Hakka version calls for adding shrimp balls. My personal favorite, and the version my grandmother cooked for me very often when I was young, was watercress with pork ribs soup. You can also make watercress with chicken soup. They are both delicious and a good source of calcium.

8. Mustard Green Chicken Soup

Mustard Green Chicken Soup is one of our traditional Taiwanese New Year dishes. The long stalk from the mustard green represents long life and it’s simply a great dish for the Chinese New Year.

The Mustard Green vegetable is also known as “Brassica Juncea”. It’s a kind of mustard plant that not only Chinese people use in their food but also Indian.

It has a very unique taste that has a kind of horseradish-mustard flavor. Another thing worth to mentioning about Mustard Green is its health benefits.

Mustard Green contains high levels of Vitamin K, C and A as well as being a good source of folic acid. Mustard green also provides a rich source of anti-oxidants and flavonoids which can help the body prevent prostate, breast, colon and ovarian cancers.

9. Green Papaya And Pork Ribs Soup

In the East (China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) we believe we have a natural remedy that will make women’s breasts larger. If you ask a Chinese person what kind of food can help ladies breast grow, 99% of people will answer you “Green/unripe papaya”.

Here is a simple version of green papaya soup. I use pork ribs as the other main ingredient for this soup. But you can use chicken and chicken broth instead.

The list above isn’t conclusive but these are the most popular Chinese soup recipes. If you trawl through the internet you’ll find various other soup recipes but the recipes here are a combination of personal favourite and also Western restaurant/takeaway favourites.

Edited by Liv Wan