Top 35 Types of Coneflowers to Grow

A Look at Different Coneflower Colors and Shapes

purple coneflower

The Spruce / Ana Cadena

Something exciting has happened to the humble native coneflower over the past decade. Breeders have put their best efforts toward developing new and improved colors and forms of this easy-growing native perennial wildflower. Some of the newest varieties are hybrid crosses between two different coneflower species. With these makeovers, Echinacea has morphed into a rock star in the garden. With the addition of so many new Echinacea forms, it is possible to design an entire landscape centered on this flower.

Not that there was anything wrong with the original E. purpurea, a familiar dusky purple daisy-like flower with a prominent orange center. Its long bloom period, self-seeding habit, and drought tolerance still make it a favorite of beginners and professionals alike, who delight in the wildlife-friendly attributes of the pollen-rich blooms. Coneflowers are trouble-free but just watch out that you don't overwater the plant or root rot and fungal diseases like powdery mildew can occur.

Tip

All coneflowers can become dense and root-bound over time, causing blooms to become sparse. Dig up, divide, and replant the root clumps to keep the plants vigorous. This is a good time to propagate new plants and give prized varieties to friends and neighbors.

Here are 35 stunning coneflower hybrids and cultivars for your garden, but be on the lookout for new varieties introduced each year.

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    Avalanche (Echinacea purpurea 'Avalanche')

    Avalanche Coneflower

     

    AYImages / Getty Images

    A 2008 introduction that thrives in full sun or dappled shade, 'Avalanche' may well replace the less hardy Shasta daisy in your flower garden. White with a green center, these plants are deer-resistant and will grow in rocky soils. This plant has the typical long bloom period (June through August) of the classic coneflower.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 12 to 18 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Cheyenne Spirit (Echinacea 'Cheyenne Spirit')

    Cheyenne Spirit Coneflower

     

    Neydtstock / Getty Images 

    This Fleuroselect Gold Medal winner takes the guesswork out of garden design; one packet of seeds will yield cheerful blooms that include shades of yellow, white, cream, red, pink, orange, yellow, or purple ray flowers with brown disk centers, perhaps on the same plant! If you start your seeds indoors after Christmas, you will see summer blooms on these fast-growing plants. 'Cheyenne Spirit' blooms June through August.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4a to 9a
    • Height: 12 to 30 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Daydream (Echinacea 'Daydream')

    Daydream Coneflower

    National Garden Bureau

    The gently drooping petals and prominent cones of 'Daydream' will remind you of the native form of Echinacea blooms, but 'Daydream' delivers more flowers on highly branching and compact plants. This variety produces soft yellow flowers that bloom earlier than other varieties, beginning as early as May and continuing the show for five months.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9
    • Height: 12 to 24 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • 04 of 35

    Double Scoop Cranberry (Echinacea x purpurea 'Balscanery')

    Double Scoop Cranberry Coneflower

    National Garden Bureau

    The Double Scoop Series of Echinacea is a response to consumer demand for lush, double-petaled flowers. In addition to the clear red blooms of 'Double Scoop Cranberry,' gardeners can purchase Bubblegum, Orangeberry, and Raspberry variations on the Double Scoop coneflowers, all featuring a mop of petals surrounded by flaring petals. Flowers begin blooming in July and continue into September.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 7
    • Height: 23 to 25 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
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  • 05 of 35

    Firebird (Echinacea 'Firebird')

    Firebird coneflower

     

    Daniela White Images / Getty Images

    The glowing shuttlecock blooms of 'Firebird' appeal to gardeners who love the cones of echinacea as much as they do the petals. It was developed in Oregon as part of the Bird Series in 2009. One of the best features of this butterfly magnet is the non-fading color of the brilliant flowers. 'Firebird' blooms profusely from midsummer through fall. 

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9
    • Height: 24 to 36 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • 06 of 35

    Flame Thrower (Echinacea 'Flame Thrower')

    Flame thrower coneflower

     

    Maria Mosolova / Getty Images

    This 2009 introduction from Oregan has bicolor yellow and orange petals combined with deep red cones, making it a garden designer’s dream. Pair this early bloomer with the crimson and gold 'Summer Punch' coreopsis or your favorite burgundy Heuchera variety. 'Flame Thrower' has the typical long bloom season—mid-summer through fall. 

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 30 to 36 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Greenline (Echinacea purpurea 'Greenline')

    Greenline Coneflower

    National Garden Bureau

    If you have not discovered the green flower craze, 'Greenline' coneflowers are a great introduction to this versatile bloom color. A stand of 'Greenline' adds textural interest to the sunny border, but these chartreuse beauties shine when planted alongside magenta or hot pink flowers.

    'Greenline' is a relatively early bloomer by coneflower standards, producing flowers from June to August.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 18 to 24 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • 08 of 35

    Hot Papaya (Echinacea 'Hot Papaya')

    Hot papaya coneflower

     

    Jori Reijonen / Getty Images

    The Dutch have provided so many new flower introductions, and this garden exclamation point, 'Hot Papaya' from breeder Arie Blom, is no exception. Newly opened flowers start with a brilliant gold hue, which transition to tropical flame orange. The flowers shine among other bright yellow and red flowers, but also stand out when combined with cool blue flowers. 'Hot Papaya' blooms from early to mid-summer.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9
    • Height: 30 to 36 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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  • 09 of 35

    Leilani (Echinacea 'Leilani')

    Leilani Coneflower

    National Garden Bureau

    As one of the members of Terra Nova’s Prairie Pillars Series, 'Leilani' coneflowers exhibit strong stems that perform well as cut flowers on vigorous plants that shrug off the harsh summer heat. The plants bear bright yellow flowers from July through October with occasional deadheading.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9
    • Height: 36 to 42 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    PowWow Wild Berry (Echinacea purpurea 'PAS702917')

    PowWow Wild Berry Coneflower

     

    ZoomTravels / Getty Images

    Available as seeds to populate your large garden, 'PowWow Wild Berry' will bloom just 20 weeks after sowing. The 2010 All-America Selection winner continues to pump out new buds, even if you fail to deadhead faded blooms. This is a more compact plant, and one with a preference for a slightly cooler climate than most coneflowers. It blooms from June to August in most locations.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 24 to 36 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • 11 of 35

    Secret Passion (Echinacea 'Secret Passion')

    Secret Passion Coneflower

     National Garden Bureau

    The variable names in the coneflower Secret Series hint that this flower is trying to break into the lucrative Valentine’s cut flower market. 'Secret Passion' joins eight other 'Secret' echinaceas, including 'S. Glow', 'S. Desire', and 'S. Romance', all sporting fully double and lushly petaled blossoms. The flowers are fragrant and fade-resistant, making them valuable additions to your vase. 'Secret Passion' is a good choice for southern gardens and they bloom throughout the summer.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 10
    • Height: 24 to 36 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
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    Tomato Soup (Echinacea 'Tomato Soup')

    Tomato Soup Coneflower


    Barberelli / Getty Images

     

    If you are creating a patriotic red, white, and blue garden, vibrant red 'Tomato Soup' coneflowers will bloom their hearts out throughout the summer, June through August. Pair them with easy bachelor’s buttons and any white coneflower variety to complete the display. Plant these in full sun for the best color development.

    A medium-sized coneflower, this variety is known for enormous flowers, a full five inches across.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 32 to 36 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Intense Orange (Echinacea 'Intense Orange')

    Echinacea 'Intense Orange'

    Mt. Cuba Center

    Introduced in 2017 as part of the Kismet Series, 'Intense Orange' echinacea is noted for a large number of flowers in multi-tone shades ranging from deep orange to rich pumpkin. Dark green foliage complements the flowers, which continue to bloom from summer through frost.  

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9
    • Height: 18 to 24 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
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    Sunrise (Echinacea 'Sunrise' )

    Echinacea 'Sunrise'

     

    marcophotos / Getty Images

    'Sunrise' is one of the Big Sky Series (E. paradoxa crossed with E. purpurea). It has pale yellow flowers with centers that start green and change to gold. The flowers are five inches across and very fragrant. This hybrid blooms throughout the summer. 

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9
    • Height: 30 to 36 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • 15 of 35

    Green Envy (Echinacea purpurea 'Green Envy')

    Echinacea purpurea 'Green Envy'

    Joshua McCullough / Getty Images

    'Green Envy' is one of the more unusual coneflowers. Its flowers start completely green, then gradually develop a halo of magenta around the center cone. This variety has a slightly shorter bloom season than other ​coneflowers (mid-to late-summer). It is a good choice for very warm climates.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9
    • Height: 24 to 36 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • 16 of 35

    Razzmatazz (Echinacea purpurea 'Razzmatazz')

    Cosmos Razzmatazz flowerhead and bud
    Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

    'Razzmatazz' is a true patented double coneflower bred in Holland. Instead of a central cone, each flower has a dome covered with short petals surrounded by a skirt of longer petals. The flowers are bright pink, blooming throughout the summer, June through August

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 9
    • Height: 24 to 30 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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  • 17 of 35

    Doubledecker (Echinacea purpurea 'Echinacea purpurea 'Razzmatazz'')

    Double decker coneflower

     

    Maria Mosolova / Getty Images

    'Doubledecker' was developed from an unusual mutation in Germany. It is a pink coneflower with a unique double-layer bloom. In the first year, the plant's blooms resemble traditional pink coneflowers, but beginning in the second growing season, the second layer of shorter petals appears. This coneflower has a long bloom period from late spring to late summer, and it prefers a slightly cooler climate. 

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 30 to 40 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Kim's Knee High (Echinacea purpurea 'Kim's Knee High')

    Kim's Knee High coneflower

     

    gardendata / Getty Images 

    Closely resembling a traditional purple coneflower in nearly every way except size, 'Kim's Knee High' is the smallest of coneflower varieties. It is a good choice for small gardens, or wherever a more compact variety is called for. The clear pink flowers bloom from June to August.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 12 to 24 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • 19 of 35

    Bravado (Echinacea purpurea 'Bravado')

    Close-up image of the beautiful summer flowering Echinacea Purpurea pink flowers also known as the purple coneflower
    Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

    ' Bravado' resembles a traditional wild coneflower on steroids. It is a robust plant that grows to fully four feet in height ​with large four to five-inch-wide blooms that range in color from light pink to magenta rose. Unlike native varieties, 'Bravado' holds its petals more outright, rather than curving downward. It has the typical summer-long bloom period, from June through August.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 36 to 48 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Fragrant Angel (Echinacea purpurea 'Fragrant Angel')

    Fragrant angel coneflower


    TatianaMironenko / Getty Images

    'Fragrant Angel 'is part of the Prairie Pillar Series from Terra Nova Nurseries in Oregon. This new variety is considerably improved over early white forms, with large white daisy-like flowers with a striking golden-orange central cone, and petals that stand out horizontally rather than curving downward. This is quite a tall plant, and it blooms with a strong fragrance throughout the summer.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 9
    • Height: 48 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Harvest Moon (Echinacea 'Harvest Moon')

    Big Sky Harvest Moon coneflower

     

    aceshot / Getty Images 

    This is another of the Big Sky Series produced by crossing E. purpurea and E. paradoxa. This variety has deep golden yellow petals with large, striking orange cones. Like others in this series, 'Harvest Moon' has a good tolerance for heat and humidity, and it blooms through the entire summer period. 

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 8
    • Height: 24 to 36 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Mango Meadowbrite ( Echinacea 'Mango Meadowbrite')

    Yellow Coneflower (variety: Mango Meadow Brite), Echinacea. Michigan. USA
    Ed Reschke / Getty Images

    'Mango Meadowbrite' has been around since 2004 but remains a favorite due to its unique shade of orange/tangerine blooms. This variety is one of the earliest blooming coneflowers, producing its unusual three-inch wide flower in mid-summer through mid-fall. Unusual for coneflowers, 'Mango Meadowbrite ' has a spicy orange aroma. 

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9
    • Height: 30 to 36 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
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    Orange Meadowbrite (Echinacea 'Orange Meadowbrite')

    Orange Meadowbrite Coneflower

    Gardenia.net

    Another unusual color is the 'Orange Meadowbrite' echinacea variation also sold as Art's Pride. This variety was developed at the Chicago Botanical Garden in 2004 as a cross between Echinacea purpurea 'Alba" and Echinacea paradoxa. Its continued popularity is due to its unique deep orange or coppery-orange petals surrounding dark brown central cones. This hybrid blooms from June to August.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 9
    • Height: 24 to 36 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Pixie Meadowbrite (Echinacea 'Meadowbrite')

    Pixie Meadowbrite

     

    A S Milton / Getty Images 

    'Pixie Meadowbrite' represents one of the best dwarf varieties. It produces traditional-looking purple flowers in dense masses that are quite unusual for most coneflower varieties. Like the other 'Meadowbrite' varieties, this one was developed at the Chicago Botanical Garden. It has the typical summer-long bloom season found in most coneflowers.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 9
    • Height: 12 to 24 inches
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun
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    Butterfly Kisses (Echinacea purpurea 'Butterfly Kisses')

    Echinacea purpurea ‘Butterfly Kisses’

    Mt. Cuba Center

    Netherland's breeder Arie Blom also introduced 'Butterfly Kisses' from unknown parents but this pink stunner was introduced by Plants Nouveau as part of the Cone-fections Series. It's a fragrant compact double flower with shades of pink petals and a pronounced darker raspberry pompom center. It's perfect for borders, meadows, and even woodland gardens. These deer- and drought-tolerant coneflowers bloom from June to August.

    • Native Area: Central to southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 1 to 1.5 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • 26 of 35

    Green Jewel (Echinacea purpurea 'Green Jewel')

    Echinacea purpurea 'Green Jewel'

    Dinkum / Wikimedia Commons / CC0

    'Green Jewel' is another unusual green-tinted gem from the Netherlands discovered in 2005. The large, bright, but lighter green ray petals are punctuated with dark green center cones. The mildly fragrant coneflowers are ideal for accents in rock gardens and woodland gardens but look just as lovely as highlights along borders. This variety will bloom from late spring into late summer and even offers occasional blooms until the frost hits.

    • Native Area: Central and eastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 1.5 to 2 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • 27 of 35

    Ferris Wheel (Echinacea ‘Ferris Wheel’)

    Echinacea ‘Ferris Wheel’

    Terra Nova Nurseries

    'Ferris Wheel,' a shorter cousin to the purple, pink, and orange 'Quills and Thrills,' has a showy wagon-wheel petal pattern (with flared or quilled rays) with at first pale cream turns to bright lemon over time with a reddish center cone. This coneflower blooms from late summer through early fall.

    • Native Area: Central and eastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 10
    • Height: 2 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • 28 of 35

    Milk Shake (Echinacea 'Milk Shake')

    Echinacea Milk shake

    Olga Seifutdinova / Getty Images

    'Milk Shake,' part of the Cone-fection Series, has double creamy vanilla-white blooms with droopy white rays and a pale yellowish-green rounded center pompom with elongated disk florets. The centers may have varying degrees of golden-reddish bullseyes or none at all. These coneflowers bloom in the summer, from June to August, and potentially into the early fall.

    • Native Area: Central and eastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9
    • Height: 2 to 3 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Pink Poodle (Echinacea purpurea 'Pink Poodle')

    Echinacea purpurea 'Pink Poodle'

    Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

    'Pink Poodle' coneflowers look like annual zinnias, but these bright and fluffy double pink blooms are perennials. The name comes from the heads that look like the spherical ball of fur at the end of a clipped poodle's tail. Each flower can grow to 4 inches in diameter. These coneflowers bloom from early summer until late summer with sporadic flowering until the frost hits.

    • Native Area: Central and southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 8
    • Height: 2 to 2.5 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Marmalade (Echinacea 'Marmalade')

    echinacea marmalade

    Mt. Cuba Center

    'Marmalade' coneflowers have a carnation-like appearance thanks to their fluffy marmalade-orange heads, accentuated by droopy rays of the same color. 'Marmalade' is another beautiful selection from the Cone-fection Series of double-flowered coneflowers produced by Arie Blom of the Netherlands. Enjoy a tangerine accented garden of blooms in the summer with potential blossoms that appear until the first frost.

    • Native Area: Central and eastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 8
    • Height: 2 to 2.5 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • 31 of 35

    White Swan (Echinacea purpurea 'White Swan')

    Echinacea purpurea 'White Swan'

    Kor!An / Wikimedia Commons / CC BY-SA 4.0

    'White Swan's' classic large blooms have a big coppery-orange cone surrounded by slightly drooping, daisy-like white rays. Blossoms continue from June through August with some blooms into September. These pretty white flowers are butterfly magnets.

    • Native Area: Central to southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 2 to 3 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Solar Flare (Echinacea 'Solar Flare')

    Echinacea 'Solar Flare'

    Missouri Botanical Garden

    'Solar Flare,' part of the Big Sky Series of coneflowers, offers something different for a coneflower—upright rays. Even more unique are this hybrid's large, magenta-red petals, a chocolate center, and its dark purple stem. The name comes from this coneflower's ability to "glow" and sometimes it's also called "fireworks on a stick." Enjoy the show of blooms from June through August, and possibly longer into the late summer.

    • Native Area: Central and eastern North America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 8
    • Height: 2 to 3 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Sombrero (Echinacea purpurea 'Balsomsed' Sombrero Salsa Red)

    Echinacea purpurea 'Balsomsed' Sombrero Salsa Red

    Michael Cummings / Getty Images

    The Sombrero Series of cultivars introduced by Darwin Perennials has many colors, including pink, white, yellow, and orange, plus this richly orange-red version, called 'Salsa Red.' It's a hybrid developed in Illinois in 2007, and to make it more confusing, this single whorl of a flower has since been issued another cultivar name of 'Balsomsed.' The center cone is purportedly shaped like a sombrero, which is how it got its original name. This deeply colorful coneflower will produce blooms from late spring to late summer, and possibly even longer.

    • Native Area: Central to southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 1 to 2 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Primadonna Deep Rose (Echinacea purpurea 'Primadonna Deep Rose')

    echinacea primadonna deep rose

    Alex Manders / Shutterstock

    'Primadonna Deep Rose' is a simple daisy-like configured coneflower with very slightly droopy, but sometimes upright, deep pink rays surrounding a rounded bronze cone. Flowers can grow large at four to six inches in diameter. This type of coneflower is best known for its beauty as a cut flower. You can cut these blooms between late spring and late summer, with additional flowers randomly appearing until the first frost.

    • Native Area: Central to southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 1.5 to 2 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
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    Magnus Superior (Echinacea purpurea 'Magnus Superior')

    Echinacea purpurea 'Magnus Superior'

    TonyBaggett / Getty Images

    'Magnus Superior,' named after its Swedish developer, Magnus B. Nilsson, bears rosy-violet non-drooping rays that can grow three to five, and sometimes seven inches in diameter. However 'Magnus Superior' is the improved version of 'Magnus,' offering better growth of deeper lavender rays and larger copper center cones. This award-winning coneflower won the Perennial Plant Association Plant of the Year Award in 1998 and the RHS Award of Garden Merit in 2003. You can have an ocean of pink from late spring to late summer, and potentially till the frost, of these lovely, large daisy-like blooms.

    • Native Area: Central to southeastern U.S.
    • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
    • Height: 2 to 3 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade