Stand-Up Reviews: Trip to Cancun and Who Killed the King?

Two new marketed effects offer stand-up routines to place into your act. A Trip to Cancun, by George Iglesias, offers a card trick with a slightly risque theme (and it’s based on a well known, old-school marketed effect). Meanwhile, Who Killed the King, by Kostya Kimlat, offers a “who done it?” plot with playing cards.

Review of A Trip to Cancun by George Iglesias
The ads promise to “make any signed card travel to Cancun in a very sensual way!”  Inspired by the Abbotts's old “Bathing Beauty” effect, Cancun offers a new, updated take.

Long gone are the cartoon images that are now full color pictures. And if this suggestive is right for your stage persona, you can entertain crowds with a seven-minute routines.

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The Effect
A spectator selects a card and signs it, and it’s lost in the deck. You then promise to “teleport” the spectator's card to a beach in Cancun. The card vanishes from the deck and the spectator can’t find it. Now you’re going to prove that the card has traveled to an exotic destination.

You bring out and show a poster of a lady in a red bikini bathing suit and a hula skirt, and a face-down card is seen tucked into her miniscule top. The poster is folded and the spectator is invited to reach inside to grab the card, but removes a hula skirt.

Open the poster and the hula skirt is shown to be gone and the model is no longer wearing it. This is repeated - the poster is folded and the spectator removes the bathing suit top. And the model is now shown in the poster to be missing her top, but covering herself.

The third time, the poster is folded and it’s the magician who reaches in to remove the card.

And when the card is removed, it has a bathing suit bottom attached to it. The magician shows the playing card to be the signed one. And then there’s a gag that appears when the poster is unfolded and revealed.

The Kit
The kit comes with everything that you need to perform the trick, including the poster. The trick is not difficult to learn and perform but will take some practice. If you like, there’s an easier version that does not involve a signed card that is for beginners. The gimmicked poster is well made and should prove to be durable.

This effect offers lots of potential comedy for the right audiences. If you like the plot and feel that it may appeal to and not offend your audiences, and is consistent with your stage persona, this one may work for you.

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Review of Who Killed The King by Kostya Kimlat

Here’s an with jumbo cards that is from Kostya Kimlat. It’s an entertaining routine with a built-in murder mystery theme that is distinctly different.

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Suicide King
Most assume that the King of Hearts, also known as the “suicide king,” has taken his own life.

But the premise here is that there’s someone else in the deck who is trying to get away with a murder.

A card is selected and “suspects” are questioned. After interrogating the queens, it’s the Queen of Spades that’s discovered guilty through evidence that involves her holding the murder weapon. The effect comes with ten custom printed jumbo cards to perform the effect that show the various suspects as well as reveal the murder weapon. There’s also a “scattered force card” to allow for the visual selection of a card by a spectator.

Plays Big
The effect is easy to learn and perform and there are no difficult moves or . This one truly packs small and plays big. All you need to carry with you are the ten jumbo cards and a deck and you’re always ready to go. The ads state that this one can play to a crowd of a thousand, but I think it’s best for stand-up shows of up to 100 people. I don’t think that the detail in the images will play well to really huge crowds.

With this effect, Kostya Kimlat has exploited a little known or noticed aspect of the Queens and Kings found in a Bicycle deck. I like the effect, but I really appreciate the potential for an entertaining presentation where one can pretend to be a lawyer presenting a case in court. My verdict? This one is great.

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