Keep Your Bum Clean: TUSHY Spa 3.0

A bidet attachment that cleans better than toilet paper

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4

Tushy Spa 3.0

TUSHY Spa Bidet

The Spruce / Lindsay Boyers

What We Like
  • Hot water attachment

  • Movable spout

  • Dial-controlled pressure

What We Don't Like
  • Issues with setup

  • Hot water hose stays visible

  • Water can splash

Bottom Line

The TUSHY Spa 3.0 bidet does its job so well you’ll never have to worry about a toilet paper shortage again.

4

Tushy Spa 3.0

TUSHY Spa Bidet

The Spruce / Lindsay Boyers

We purchased the Tushy Spa 3.0 bidet so our writer could put it to the test. Keep reading for our full product review.

Talking about poop can feel kind of weird, but we all do it (or at least we all should be doing it). Okay, so maybe we’re not talking about poop directly, but we all know the main purpose of a bidet attachment: To clean you up after you go, without the need for toilet paper. Bidets have been around for a long time, and are still the norm in many countries. They came back into the spotlight thanks to the Great Toilet Paper Shortage of March 2020. While toilet paper has found its way back on the shelves, interest in bidets has remained, and that’s why I wanted to try the TUSHY Spa 3.0 bidet.

The bidet setup promises to be a quick and easy process that’s done in 20 minutes or so, but that wasn’t my experience. I turned off the water source at the bottom of my toilet and the hot water source under the bathroom sink, removed the toilet seat, and got to work. While the location of all of the piping was pretty straightforward, I ran into problems when it came time to tighten everything.

TUSHY Spa Bidet

The Spruce / Lindsay Boyers

The instructions advise me to test the bidet and check for leaks before continuing through the entire process, and it’s a good thing I did because I had to fight with a leak for about 20 minutes before I could get the attachments secure enough. To be fair, my toilet piping looked like it had seen better days, but it took a separate wrench, some muscle, and a slightly flooded bathroom floor before I was able to successfully get the TUSHY installed.

While the location of all of the piping was pretty straightforward, I ran into problems when it came time to tighten everything.

Once I was able to confirm that everything was leak-free (after the fourth try), the rest of the process—putting the bidet in place on the toilet bowl and reattaching the toilet seat—went smoothly.

TUSHY Spa Bidet

The Spruce / Lindsay Boyers

Now came the real test: performance. I went about my business like I normally do and when I was done, I turned on the bidet and let it do its work. There are two knobs that control the bidet—one for pressure and one for temperature. The pressure dial allows you to clean your bottom, but you can turn it in the opposite direction so that it cleans the nozzle, keeping it sanitary after every use. There’s also a switch that lets you move the nozzle up and down to aim it exactly where you want it.

The aim is spot-on, though. The nozzle lined up perfectly with the spots I wanted clean, and I could move it up and down to make sure the entire area was hit with water.

The pressure is strong enough to make sure you get squeaky clean but not so strong that it’s uncomfortable, even on full blast. Just like with the sink water, it does take a little time for the water to warm up, something I didn’t realize at first. It’s a good idea to let the bidet run a little bit on low pressure (it will just drip into the toilet bowl) to warm up before you turn the pressure up and have it touch your skin. 

I tested the water temperature on the highest setting, and it was bearable, but it does get pretty hot, so when using the bidet, you want to make sure to start slowly and increase the temperature gradually until you find your sweet spot, just like you would in the shower.

TUSHY Spa Bidet

The Spruce / Lindsay Boyers

The aim is spot-on, though. The nozzle lined up perfectly with the spots I wanted clean, and I could move it up and down to make sure the entire area was hit with water. Moving the nozzle around does cause some splashing onto the toilet seats though, especially if I was seated a little too far forward. The water that splashed onto the seat was clean, so it’s not a big deal, but it’s something worth mentioning.

When I was done with the bidet, I wiped with some toilet paper, just as a test to see if I was clean, and I was, impressively so. There’s really no need to finish the job with toilet paper, but there is water that’s left behind, so if you don’t have time to air dry, a little pat dry with a square or two will do the trick.

Tushy Spa Bidet

The Spruce / Lindsay Boyers

Aside from a rocky setup process, the only other thing I didn’t love about the TUSHY Spa 3.0 bidet is the placement and visibility of the hot water attachment hose. The 9-foot hose connects to the hot water attachment under the sink and then extends all the way to the toilet. Aside from cutting a hole in the side of my bathroom vanity to snake the hose through, the only other option was to guide the hose through the doors in the front of the vanity. So not only does one of the doors stay slightly propped open, but the hose is totally visible in the bathroom. 

There’s really no need to finish the job with toilet paper, but there is water that’s left behind, so if you don’t have time to air dry, a little pat dry with a square or two will do the trick.

As a temporary solution, I snaked it behind a wooden cabinet that I have in the bathroom so that it’s partially hidden, but it’s not something that will work for me long-term. At some point, for aesthetic reasons, I’ll have to put a hole in the side of the vanity to hide it better.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do you still need to use toilet paper?

The TUSHY bidet pumps out enough pressure to clean you off without the need for toilet paper. You may need a square or two to dry your tush off after you use the bidet, but you also have the option to air dry if you prefer, and you’ll be completely clean. There’s no need for extra wiping.

If you do want to pat dry in a more sustainable way, TUSHY also offers a stand with bamboo tissues that dispenses one environmentally-friendly tissue at a time.

Does it come in different colors?

The TUSHY Spa 3.0 bidet comes in two color combos—white with bamboo knobs and white with shiny platinum knobs. The bamboo option is perfect for warm-toned bathrooms and farmhouse-style decor, while the platinum knobs fit in nicely with modern and contemporary setups.

Do I need to hire a plumber to install it?

The TUSHY Spa 3.0 bidet does attach to your hot water system, but there’s no need to hire a plumber unless you feel really uncomfortable messing with your water supply. There’s no additional plumbing required and no electrical hook-ups, so the worst that can happen if you do it wrong is you end up with a leak in your bathroom that’s immediately noticeable (and immediately fixable).

Does the TUSHY Spa 3.0 bidet work with all types of toilet seats?

The TUSHY Spa 3.0 bidet works with most types of toilet seats, from oval to round to elongated. If you have a custom toilet seat or one that’s extra-large, reach out to customer service before ordering to make sure the bidet attachment will work with your toilet seat.

Can you install the TUSHY on the left side of the toilet?

Right now, TUSHY only makes a right-sided bidet attachment. According to its website, a left TUSHY is in the works, but there’s no estimated time frame for when it will be available for purchase.

Where does the water come from?

The water is clean water that comes from your water source, just like the water from your sink. It’s not dirty or recycled water from your toilet bowl, and the TUSHY is extremely sanitary.

Competition: TUSHY Spa 3.0 vs. Omigo Element

TUSHY and Omigo are probably the most well-known bidet attachments, and since I tested both, I have firsthand experience of their pros and cons. The Omigo retails lower than the TUSHY's $149 bidet, coming in at around $89. As far as nozzle positioning goes, the TUSHY wins. It has one nozzle that you can adjust to hit in just the right spot. The Omigo has two, one designed for the rear and one designed for your front, so it never feels like it’s hitting exactly where it needs to go.

But when it comes to installation, Omigo wins. The attachments and hoses were easier to maneuver and attach, and I had the Omigo set up and ready to go in about 10 minutes compared to an hour with the TUSHY. To be fair, the TUSHY Spa 3.0 includes a hot water attachment, and getting that set up took extra time that I would gladly trade for the hot water feature.

Final Verdict

Put one on your toilet.

The TUSHY Spa 3.0 bidet may take some getting used to, but it’s an attachment every toilet should have. While the setup process can get a little messy, your TUSHY will be squeaky clean every time you use it.

Specs

  • Product Name Spa 3.0
  • Product Brand Tushy
  • Price $149
  • Material Plastic
  • Return Policy 60-Day risk free guarantee