15 Types of Monstera to Grow

Close-Up Of Potted Monstera Plant On Table Against Wall

Kseniâ Solov'eva / EyeEm / Getty Images

Monsteras are some of the most iconic, easily recognizable, and on-trend houseplants. The lush, tropical-looking foliage of these vining plants comes complete with eye-catching, unique holes (fenestrations) in mature specimens. As an added bonus, despite their exotic look, they're surprisingly easy-going, and even beginner indoor plant enthusiasts can nurture these beauties without too much effort.

Don't forget, though, it takes time for the dramatic fenestration to develop on young plants, and they aren't a great choice if you have curious pets that like to explore with their mouths. Monsteras contain insoluble calcium oxalates that are highly toxic to dogs and cats.

Although there are close to 50 species in the monstera genus, only a handful are available via local plant nurseries and retailers. Several species, cultivars, and variegated varieties are growing in popularity, but others are rare and expensive. If you want to make an impression with a monstera in your home, check out the list below, including some of the common and more hard-to-come-by, enthusiast-only options.

  • 01 of 15

    Monstera Deliciosa (Monstera Deliciosa)

    Monstera deliciosa in a woven basket on an apartment floor

    The Spruce / Letícia Almeida

    The most readily available and well-known of all the monstera species—the Monstera deliciosa is the one you're most likely to see in Instagrammable designer homes. The large foliage of the mature plants has striking fenestration, and this exotic-looking plant is super easy to grow indoors. Individual leaves grow to be up to 3 feet long, and with its upward vining growth habit and aerial roots, it grows best up against a pole or trellis. When grown in the right climate outdoors, you might see creamy flowers and then edible, juicy fruit that attracts pollinators and other wildlife to your yard.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 12
    • Height: 10 to 15 feet tall
    • Sun Exposure: Bright indirect sunlight, partial shade
  • 02 of 15

    Monstera Acuminata (Monstera Acuminata)

    'Monstera Acuminata' or Swiss cheese vine house plant on white background

    Firn / Getty Images

    If you're lucky enough to find this rare species, it's a great choice for small, tight-for-space apartments or for trailing over hanging baskets. It looks similar to Monstera adansonii, but the foliage and height are more compact.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 12
    • Height: Up to 7 feet when grown outdoors
    • Sun Exposure: Bright indirect sunlight, partial shade
  • 03 of 15

    Swiss Cheese Plant (Monstera Adansonii)

    Swiss cheese plant (Monstera adansonii) in a pot on a wooden desk

    The Spruce / Cara Cormack

    Sometimes called the Swiss cheese or monkey mask plant, this monstera species comes in as runner-up in terms of popularity and availability after the Monstera deliciosa. Although it's a bit smaller, it can still reach heights of up to 8 feet when grown indoors and has a climbing, fast-developing growth habit which may benefit from occasional trimming. Given its common name, it's no surprise that the Swiss cheese plant has impressive foliage fenestration when mature.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 12
    • Height: Up to 8 feet indoors
    • Sun Exposure: Partial sun
  • 04 of 15

    Monstera Dubia (Monstera Dubia)

    Potted Monstera Dubia against a light wall

    The Spruce / Anastasiia Tretiak

    This lesser-known variegated monstera species, sometimes called the shingle plant, has small heart-shaped leaves. The vining habit results in the foliage lying close to whatever its stems are trailing up against. Although it can grow in low light conditions, bright, indirect light produces more eye-catching variegation. This is one of the species you'll probably only find at a higher price via specialist suppliers. Although mature plants do develop fenestration, those grown at home are likely to remain in their solid juvenile state.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 11
    • Height: Up to 3 feet tall
    • Sun Exposure: Partial sun
    Continue to 5 of 15 below.
  • 05 of 15

    Monstera Peru (Monstera karstenianum)

    Indoor Monstera Peru in a ceramic pot

    The Spruce / Cori Sears

    If you can get your hands on this rare climbing species, you won't have to worry about it being hard to care for or taking up too much space. This small member of the genus grows quickly and vigorously in the right conditions. However, unlike many other monstera species, Peru doesn't develop fenestrations on its leaves. Despite this, the thick foliage has eye-catching deep ridges and a glossy dark green color.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 10b to 12b
    • Height:6 to 8 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Part shade
  • 06 of 15

    Monstera Obliqua (Monstera Obliqua)

    Monstera obliqua in front of a light wall in a gray striped pot

    Kseniya Ovchinnikova / Getty Images

    One of the rarest of the monstera species, the obliqua is sometimes called the unicorn plant. When mature, it has extreme fenestration and the holes can take up to 90 percent of the leaf surface. Their wafer-thin structure makes them exceptionally delicate, and they are also difficult to find in the wild. It's doubtful you'll be lucky enough to find this plant, even from the best specialists, and, if you do, it may cost a small fortune—but, for the keenest species enthusiasts, it's nice to dream.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 11
    • Height: 6 to 10 feet outdoors
    • Sun Exposure: Partial sun
  • 07 of 15

    Monstera Pinnatipartita (Monstera Pinnatipartita)

    Green Leaves Pattern of Monstera Pinnatipartita (Siam Monstera) Plant

    KDP / Getty Images

    Rather than fenestration on the mature foliage, this monstera species gets its name from its pinnate, feather-like mature, large, and glossy leaves. Harder to find than the likes of the Deliciosa or Adansonii, you may be lucky to find one of these exotic beauties online.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 11 to 12
    • Height: Up to 6 feet when grown indoors
    • Sun Exposure: Partial sun
  • 08 of 15

    Silver Monstera (Monstera Siltepecana)

    Rare tropical 'Monstera Siltepecana' house plant in small black flower pot on dark black background

    Firn / Getty Images

    It's all about the unusual color with the Monstera siltepecana, and, encouragingly, it is more widely available than some of the other rare varieties on this list. The solid, young, and lance-shaped foliage is blue-silvery gray with green veins. Mature leaves are dark, glossy green with fenestration and a climbing habit. If you buy a juvenile plant, you'll enjoy the silver coloring for at least a couple of years.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 11 to 12
    • Height: Up to 6 feet indoors
    • Sun Exposure: Bright indirect sunlight, partial shade
    Continue to 9 of 15 below.
  • 09 of 15

    Monstera Standleyana (Monstera Standleyana)

    Close up of tropical 'Monstera Standleyana', also called 'Philodendron Cobra' house plant with narrow dark green leaves with white variegation on dark black background

    Firn / Getty Images

    This rare, compact monstera species stands out for its unusual and unpredictable individual foliage color variations. Look out for speckles, splotches, and stripes in yellow, cream, or white against glossy green. Also known as the 5 holes plant, it won't always develop fenestration in an indoor environment.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 11
    • Height: Up to 5 feet tall indoors
    • Sun Exposure: Bright indirect sunlight, partial shade
  • 10 of 15

    Monstera Deliciosa 'Thai Constellation'

    Monstera Deliciosa 'Thai Constellation' cultivar in a pot amongst other house plants

    Firn /Getty Images

    This highly sought-after, lab-cultured monstera is undoubtedly stunning. The splotchy, creamy white, and yellow pattern on the fenestrated foliage results in a unique form of variegation that, for some enthusiasts, makes it a worthwhile investment. Although it is one of the more widely available variegated varieties, it still has a pretty high price tag.

    • Native Area: N/a
    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 12
    • Height: Up to 8 feet indoors
    • Sun Exposure: Bright indirect sunlight, partial shade
  • 11 of 15

    Monstera Deliciosa Albo Borsigiana Variegata

    Monstera Deliciosa Albo Borsigiana Variegated

    Nora Carol Photography / Getty Images

    Another highly sought-after, compact, expensive, and variegated deliciosa variety, Albo has a striking, irregular coloration on the foliage. It looks similar to 'Thai constellation', but the splotchy white patterns can develop to be pure white on some leaves of mature specimens.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 12
    • Height: Up to 6 feet indoors
    • Sun Exposure: Bright indirect sunlight, partial shade
  • 12 of 15

    Variegated Monstera Deliciosa (Monstera deliciosa 'variegata')

    Variegated monstera deliciosas in front of a window

    The Spruce / Kara Riley

    Variegated varieties are always high on any monstera enthusiast's list. But, because they are so tricky and slow to propagate, they are rare and expensive. The deliciosa 'variegata' has naturally occurring variegation as a result of a genetic mutation. The unpredictability of this mutation means it is still tough to come by.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 12
    • Height: 10 to 15 feet tall
    • Sun Exposure: Bright indirect sunlight, partial shade
    Continue to 13 of 15 below.
  • 13 of 15

    Monstera Peru (Variegated)

    Monstera karstenianum variegated foliage

    Sutthipong Kongtrakool / Getty Images

    If you're looking for a compact monstera with beautiful individual patterns on its thick foliage, consider the variegated variety of the Monstera Peru. Just remember that this plant won't develop fenestrations on its foliage—regardless of how mature it is.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 10b to 12b
    • Height:6 to 8 feet
    • Sun Exposure: Part shade
  • 14 of 15

    Mini Monstera (Rhaphidophora Tetrasperma)

    Mini Monstera (Rhaphidophora Tetrasperma) on plant stand

    Firn / Getty Images

    This plant is an honorary monstera. Although its common name, care requirements, and appearance could lead you to believe it is part of the genus, this compact little species with distinctive fenestrated foliage is actually part of the Rhaphidophora genus. It's a perfect option if you are looking for a low-maintenance and easy-to-find alternative.

    • Native Area: Africa, Asia
    • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 12
    • Height: 6 to 8 feet tall indoors
    • Sun Exposure: Partial shade
  • 15 of 15

    Monstera Lechleriana (Monstera Lechleriana)

    Monstera lechleriana

    Stefano / flickr / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

    This is one of the hardiest and fastest-growing monstera species, with larger foliage than the similar Adansonii. The small holes of the Monstera lechleriana develop in the centre of the leaves.

    If you can get your hands on one of these plants, you'll probably have to provide it with some support and make sure it has plenty of space to expand.

    • Native Area: South and Central America
    • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 12
    • Height: Up to 6 feet when grown indoors
    • Sun Exposure: Part shade

Tip

If you're interested in out-of-the-ordinary species, check out these rare plants well worth the splurge.

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  1. Swiss cheese plant. ASPCA.