15 Types of Phlox Perfect for Your Garden

Nora Leigh tall garden phlox

The Spruce / Autumn Wood 

Garden phlox (Phlox paniculata) is a low maintenance, colorful plant valued by gardeners seeking continuous sequence of bloom. There are over 60 species of phlox, but garden phlox is the most popular. Many produce fragrant blooms right into late summer, when other perennials have finished blooming. All cultivars of this perennial need a well-drained, rich, moist soil and have average water needs. Here are 15 types of garden phlox in a variety of colors that will add to your garden.

  • 01 of 15

    David Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'David')

    'David' white phlox

    The Spruce / Autumn Wood  

    Garden phloxes struggle with powdery mildew. Since extreme heat makes this disease worse, many Southerners can't grow them. The 'David' cultivar, happily, offers better mildew resistance than most types. Give it partial sun if you garden in the South, and full sun in the North. Pure white flowers grace its sturdy stems.

    • USDA Zones: 3 to 8
    • Color Varieties: White
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 2 to 4 feet
  • 02 of 15

    Nora Leigh Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Nora Leigh')

    Nora Leigh bicolor phlox

    The Spruce / Autumn Wood 

    The leaves of Nora Leigh offer a nice twist in that they are variegated, having green centers and white margins. Since the two-toned flowers also have a lot of white in them, the overall impression created by Nora Leigh is one of brightness without boredom.

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Bicolored (white with pink centers)
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 2 to 3 feet
  • 03 of 15

    Volcano Ruby Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Barthirtyone')

    Volcano Ruby (image) is one of the tall phloxes. It blooms in August.

    The Spruce / David Beaulieu

    Ruby is part of the "Volcano" series and valued for its richly-colored blossoms. The flowers of the Volcano series come in a number of different colors. Like 'David,' Ruby is a mildew-resistant variety, so it can be grown further south than most types of garden phlox. But give it only partial sun in the South (full sun in the North).

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 10
    • Color Varieties: Ruby, pink, purple, red, and white
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 2 to 3 feet
  • 04 of 15

    Bright Eyes Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Bright Eyes')

    Closeup of 'Bright Eyes' tall garden phlox flowers.

    Maria Mosolova / Getty Images

    One of the nice pink phloxes is Bright Eyes. It is also shorter than most types, which is great for low-maintenance landscaping. Some of the taller types of garden phlox require staking, which means extra work for you.

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Bicolored (light pink with darker pink centers)
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 1.5 to 2 feet
    Continue to 5 of 15 below.
  • 05 of 15

    Laura Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Laura')

    Phlox 'Laura'

    David J. Stang / Wikimedia Commons / CC BY-SA 4.0

    Laura's flowers have one of the most vibrant colors in a darker shade of any garden phlox. Like other members of the genus, it offers the side benefit of attracting hummingbirds and butterflies to the yard.

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Bicolored (light purple with white center)
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 3 to 4 feet
  • 06 of 15

    Grenadine Dream Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Grenadine Dream')

    Grenadine Dream phlox in bloom.

    Katrin Ray Shumakov / Getty Images


    For an especially vibrant color in a brighter shade, try 'Grenadine Dream' garden phlox. It is another of the shorter garden phloxes, allowing you to avoid having to stake your plants.

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Grenadine
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 1 to 2 feet
  • 07 of 15

    Grace Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Grace')

    Grace phlox in bloom.

    G.N. van der Zee / Getty Images

    Not everyone wants a garden phlox with an in-your-face color. Sometimes, you want a plant with a flower color that complements the plants around it, rather than one that competes for your attention. 'Grace' phlox is a good choice when you want understated color.

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Light lavender
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 2 to 3 feet
  • 08 of 15

    Flame Pink Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Bartwelve')

    Pink Flame Phlox

    David J. Stang / Wikimedia Commons / CC BY-SA 4.0


    The plant industry can't seem to get the brand name for this garden phlox straight. Sometimes, it is given as Flame Pink; other times, Pink Flame. What is certain is that its rich pink is easy on the eyes. It is another type of garden phlox that stays relatively short, which means that you do not have to stake it.

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Flaming pink
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 1 to 1.5 feet
    Continue to 9 of 15 below.
  • 09 of 15

    Little Boy Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Little Boy')

    Phlox paniculata 'Little Boy' with its bicolored flowers.

    Graeme Scott / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

    Living up to its name, 'Little Boy' is another of the shorter types of Phlox paniculata. 'Little Boy' garden phlox looks like 'Laura,' but the flower has more white in it. The petals have light centers and purple edges.

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Bicolored (purple with white center)
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 1 to 1.5 feet
  • 10 of 15

    Violetta Gloriosa Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Violetta Gloriosa')

    Pink phlox (Phlox paniculata) 'Violetta Gloriosa', July
    Getty Images

    Violetta Gloriosa offers pastel color for those looking for a "soft" addition to the garden. It is a great choice as a companion for a purple plant located in the back row of a border.

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Light lavender
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 3 feet
  • 11 of 15

    Opening Act Blush Phlox (Phlox 'Opening Act Blush ')

    Opening Act Blush Phlox

    F.D. Richards / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

    Opening Act Blush is another of the garden phloxes with a very soft color. In fact, that is how it got its name. It is a hybrid that flowers earlier in the summer than most types of garden phlox. It is also mildew-resistant. The plant will eventually spread a bit via stolons.

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Light pink
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 18 to 20 inches
  • 12 of 15

    Orange Perfection Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Orange Perfection')

    Closeup of group of Orange Perfection phlox flowers.

    The Spruce / David Beaulieu

    For a more striking color, seek one of the garden phloxes in the orange-salmon-coral color range. An example is Orange Perfection, though its flowers are not really orange: They are more of a blend of pink and orange. It is not a color you see all the time in the garden, so they are well worth growing.

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Blend of pink and orange
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 2 to 3 feet
    Continue to 13 of 15 below.
  • 13 of 15

    Starfire Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Starfire')

    Phlox paniculata 'Starfire' with its flower head of deep pink blooms.

    The Spruce / David Beaulieu

    Starfire sports a vibrant, reddish-pink color similar to that of 'Grenadine Dream.' Like other members of the genus, it makes a great cut flower due to its sturdy stems.

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Reddish-pink
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 2 to 3 feet
  • 14 of 15

    Red Magic Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Red Magic')

    Closeup of Red Magic phlox flowers.

    The Spruce / David Beaulieu

    You have to be careful with plant names (brand names and cultivar names as well as common names): They can be deceiving about features like color. 'Red Magic' is not really red. But it does provide you with vibrant color for your perennial flower bed. It has a little more purple in it than does 'Starfire.'

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 8
    • Color Varieties: Reddish-purple
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 2 to 4 feet
  • 15 of 15

    Jubilee Phlox (Phlox paniculata 'Jubilee')

    Jubilee garden phlox flower head closeup.

    The Spruce / David Beaulieu

    'Jubilee,' like 'Orange Perfection,' produces blooms with a mixture of pink and orange in them. But 'Jubilee' is susceptible to powdery mildew disease. Along with 'Red Magic' and the Volcano series, it can be one of the tallest phloxes under the right conditions. Its height is a good feature if you are looking for a plant that will not get lost in the back row of a flower border, but it will require staking.

    • USDA Zones: 4 to 9
    • Color Varieties: Blend of pink and orange
    • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial sun
    • Height: 2 to 4 feet

New cultivars are constantly being introduced. Check with a local garden center to find the latest available.

Watch Now: 7 Tips for Every Gardener