Try This Easy and Unique Pinwheel Quilt Block Pattern

  • 01 of 05

    How to Sew This Easy Pinwheel Quilt Block Variation

    Quilt Block Patterns
    Can't Stop Spinnin' - pinwheel quilt block variation. © Janet Wickell

    12" Finished Pinwheel Quilt Block

    This easy pinwheel quilt block, called Can't Stop Spinnin', is assembled using one simple unit that's sewn in different color combinations. The block might appear to be complicated, but it's actually very easy to make.

    The color selections are included to help make piecing instructions clear, and to give you guidelines for color value placement, but choose fabrics and colors that appeal to your tastes.

    Be sure to refer to the illustrations as...MORE you sew. Sewing pieces in mirror image positions will change the block's layout.

    The instructions make one pinwheel quilt block. Repeat to make more.

    Yellow for Triangle at Pinwheel Block Centers

    • Cut four 3 1/2" x 3 1/2" squares

    Medium green for "leg"

    • Cut two, 3 1/2" x 6 1/2" rectangles

    Medium blue for "leg"

    • Cut two, 3 1/2" x 6 1/2" rectangles

    Light blue for "leg"

    • Cut four, 3 1/2" x 6 1/2" rectangles

    Black for center triangles

    • Cut four, 3-1/2" x 3 1/2" squares

    Use a 1/4" seam allowance for all seams. Cut all pieces with the fabric's straight grain parallel to outer edges.

    Continue to 2 of 5 below.
  • 02 of 05

    Start Sewing Your Pinwheel Quilt Blocks

    Quilt Block Patterns
    Assemble the pinwheel quilt block units. © Janet Wickell
    Assemble Patchwork for the Pinwheel Quilt Block
    1. Draw a diagonal line from corner to corner on the reverse side of each 3-1/2 inch square, yellow and black. Use chalk or a light colored pencil on the black squares (not shown).
    2. Place a yellow square at one end of a medium green rectangle, right sides together and edges matching exactly.
    3. Sew a seam from corner to corner as shown above, following the marked line on the square. Press to set the seam, then cut through both layers to remove excess fabric,...MORE leaving an approximate 1/4" seam allowance on the triangular shaped side of the unit.
    4. Carefully press the seam allowance towards the green rectangle.

      Some quilters prefer to press the seam allowance before trimming-back. Try both methods to see which works best for you. If your squares are not made from a very light, transparent fabric, it's fine to press towards the squares on these and all other units.

    5. Sew a yellow square to the end of each medium blue rectangle. Trim just as you did the previous units.

    6. Now sew a black square to the end of each light blue rectangle. Trim and press as before.
    Continue to 3 of 5 below.
  • 03 of 05

    Join the Pinwheel Quilt Block's Patchwork

    Quilt Block Patterns
    Sew the pinwheel quilt block units together. © Janet Wickell

    It's Time to Sew the Patchwork Together

    1. Sew a yellow/green unit to a light blue/black unit, arranging them as shown above. Press the seam allowance in either direction. Repeat to make a second identical unit.
    2. Sew a yellow/medium blue unit to a light blue/black unit, arranging them as shown. Press the seam allowance in either direction. Repeat to make a second identical unit.
    Continue to 4 of 5 below.
  • 04 of 05

    Finish Sewing the Spinning Pinwheel Quilt Block

    Quilt Block Patterns
    Sew pinwheel quilt block rows together, the join rows and press. © Janet Wickell
    1. Arrange the pinwheel quilt block components as shown above, turning the pieced units so that the yellow triangles form a pinwheel at the block's center.
    2. Sew the top two units together. Press seam allowance toward the green rectangle. Repeat, sewing the bottom components together, again pressing toward the green rectangle.
    3. Join the two halves to complete the pinwheel block. Press.
    Continue to 5 of 5 below.
  • 05 of 05

    Easy Layout for Pinwheel Quilt Blocks

    Quilt Block Patterns
    Example of a straight setting with this pinwheel quilt block variation. © Janet Wickell

    The layout above illustrates how sixteen identical pinwheel quilt blocks would look if sewn in a straight layout --- side by side.