How to Weave-In Beading Thread With Peyote Stitch

  • 01 of 03

    Pass Diagonally Through Several Beads

    Beading needle weaving through peyote stitch beadwork
    Beading needle weaving into the beadwork from the top corner. (Please click above for a larger view.). © Chris Franchetti Michaels

    When a peyote stitch beading pattern or tutorial calls for you to "weave-in" your thread, begin by passing the needle into an adjacent bead in your beadwork. Then pass diagonally into the beadwork, passing through one or two diagonally adjacent beads at a time.

    Stitch the free owl pattern shown in this tutorial.

    In the first photo above (the one on the far left), the needle is passing diagonally through two beads after completing the last (top) row of peyote stitch. In the center photo,...MORE the thread is being pulled gently taut. Always be careful not to pull the thread so tight that it curls or distorts your beadwork. 

    In the last photo above (the one on the far right), the needle is passing diagonally through two more beads in the beadwork. Afterward, the thread is pulled gently taut once again.  For each of these steps, it is important to follow the normal thread path to avoid the thread that is being woven in from showing between the stitches.

    Continue to 2 of 3 below.
  • 02 of 03

    Change Direction of the Thread

    Needle changing direction
    Changing direction while weaving-in. (Please click above for a larger view.). © Chris Franchetti Michaels

    After weaving diagonally through several more beads in the beadwork, make a U-turn and pass the needle through the bead directly below the one the needle exits. In the first photo above (the one on the far left), the thread is passing through this bead from right to left. In the center photo, the thread is being pulled gently taut.

    Pass diagonally through several more beads in this new direction. You can do this one, two, or three beads at a time, depending on the density of your beadwork. In the...MORE last photo above (the one on the far right), the needle is passing diagonally downward through the beadwork; but you could also pass upward diagonally.  By changing directions, the thread is more secure and less likely to become loose in the beadwork.

    If your beadwork is looser than the beadwork shown in the example, you should stop occasionally and tie a half-hitch knot over the existing thread running between two adjacent beads. This secures the thread within the beadwork so that it doesn't slip out. In most peyote stitch patterns that use cylinder beads (also called Delicas), half hitch knots are unnecessary -- and often difficult to make because the beadwork is very dense.

    Continue to 3 of 3 below.
  • 03 of 03

    Cut the Bead Thread

    Cutting beading thread in peyote stitch beadwork
    The thread being ended by cutting it close to the beadwork with the thread held taut. © Chris Franchetti Michaels

    Continue weaving through the beadwork until the thread feels secure, changing directions two or three times along the way. When you're ready to end the thread, pull it upward away from the beadwork, as shown above. Use sharp beading or embroidery scissors to trim the thread against the beadwork, while still holding the thread taut. When you release the thread after trimming, it should retract slightly into the beadwork and become invisible.  Another option is to use a thread burner to trim...MORE the thread and seal the end using heat.

    In the example above, there are a few more thread tails here and there to weave in. This will require threading the needle onto each one and weaving them in one at a time.

    Edited by Lisa Yang