Hubbing Process - What is a Coin Hub?

Original Hub for the 1964 Kennedy Half-Dollar
Original Hub for the 1964 Kennedy Half-Dollar. Image Courtesy of: The United States Mint, www.usmint.gov

Definition

A hub is a positive, or relief (raised) image of the coin's design that has been impressed into a steel die during the process of creating coin dies. The original coin image is actually a plaster sculpture about 8 to 12 inches in diameter, from which a Master Hub is created using a special process that reduces the image to the actual size of the coin. This Master Hub, which bears a relief image of the coin design, is then copied into a select number of Master Dies, (which bear the negative, or incuse image of the coin.)

The Master Dies are then copied, using a special extremely high-pressure "squeezing" process which employs tremendous hydraulic force, to create the numerous Working Hubs (commonly called simply hubs.) Then, from the hundreds of Working Hubs, the mint creates the Working Dies, (commonly just called dies.) It is from these working dies that our coins are actually struck.



The coin image on the hub is always a positive, or relief image, and the image on the die is always a negative, or incuse image. In this way, when our coins are struck, we get the raised detail we expect on our circulating coinage.

The coin hub itself looks just like a coin die, with the exception of the relief image. It is comprised of a steel shaft with the image of the coin impressed into one end of it.

The Modern Minting Process

Currently, The United States Mint uses computers and digital imaging to create our coins. Some of the artists at the mint use computer software to sculpt the coin images. Other artists sculpt directly into traditional plaster media.

If a coin design is created in plaster, it is then three-dimensionally scanned into the computer. The computer image is then manually touched up before the master hubs are created. Imperfections are removed, letters are aligned, and the design is  reviewed to make sure it can be physically produced on the coining presses that the mint uses.

The master hub's are created using a computer controlled CNC milling machine to sculpt the design directly onto a steel shank. The steel shank is now known as a master hub. The master hub is then put through a special process that hardens the steel so master dies can be made.

Gone are the days that manual processes that were once use to create master hubs from plaster models.

Computers and software now help The United States Mint to produce the highest quality coins that the world has ever seen.

Example Usage

It is during the process of making working dies from the working hubs that most of the doubled die errors occur.

 

Edited by: James Bucki